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Agincourt or Azincourt? Victory, Defeat and the War of 1415 - Dr Helen Castor

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Agincourt or Azincourt? Victory, Defeat and the War of 1415 - Dr Helen Castor

In the year of the battle's 600th anniversary, Agincourt remains one of the most resonant names in the roll-call of English military history:

Thanks to Shakespeare, the triumphant tale is embedded in our national psyche: the astonishing victory against overwhelming odds of Henry V's 'happy few' over the flower of French chivalry. But if we cry God for Harry, England and St George, we tell only half the story. What of those who cried God for Charles, France and St Denis?
The battle is set in its fifteenth-century context - when the outcome of military conflict was understood as the result of God's will - and unravels the implications of two contrasting narratives: English victory at Agincourt, and French defeat on the field they knew as Azincourt.

The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,800 lectures free to access or download from the website.
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The Consequences of France's Defeat at Agincourt - Dr Helen Castor

The consequences of France’s defeat rippled through the religious, political and military spheres. Dr Castor explains how the French rationalised the loss as a punishment from God.

You can enjoy the full lecture on our website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,800 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:
Instagram:
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The Battle of Agincourt - Dr Helen Castor

Preeminent Medieval historian, Dr Helen Castor takes us through the battle of Agincourt and discusses the conditions and manoeuvres that delivered this great English Victory

You can enjoy the full lecture on our website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,800 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:
Instagram:

An Axe to the Head: The Key to Henry V's Success - Dr Helen Castor

The British credit Henry V with tactical and strategic nous, but does his success owe more to a brutal political assassination that split the French nation? Dr Helen Castor examines this in this short clip.

You can enjoy the full lecture on our website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,800 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:
Instagram:
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The Hundred Years War: Historiography and Hindsight - Dr Helen Castor

Dr Helen Castor explains how our perception of the Hundred Years war has become bound up with centuries of history and national pride. In this short clip she explains the importance of shedding these preconceptions for a truer understanding of the past.

You can enjoy the full lecture on our website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,800 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:
Instagram:

The English Claim on the French Throne - Dr Helen Castor

The unifying theme of the 100 Years’ War was the claim on the throne of France. How did English kings come to have this claim, and how did they press it?

You can enjoy the full lecture on our website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,800 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:
Instagram:
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The Tactics and Strategy of the Hundred Years War - Dr Helen Castor

Dr Helen Castor explains how the tactic and strategy adopted by Henry V affected the course of the war and how this affected his success.


You can enjoy the full lecture on our website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,800 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:
Instagram:

Battles that Changed History: Agincourt

The 9th Grade Excel class elective studied the Battle of Agincourt. We discussed the knight, chivalry, the causes of the 100 Year's War and the impact of the longbow before we talked about this battle. Fun fact, I went home and found I had a temperature of 103. Thought I was a bit off--but we persevere. Any mistakes I made can now be blamed on illness. A random student even makes a Monty Python reference at the end. The students wanted to vote on the last battle but I say...I am not sure which one yet. Also, I apologize for referring to the English as British. That would not be the case until the 1700's. In my defense, I was teaching about 18th century Great Britain in another class at the time and it just happened.

Henry V (1989) - Kenneth Branagh - Battle of Agincourt

Teacher Resource-The Hundred Years War, Pt.1: The Road to Agincourt

An overview of the beginning of the Hundred Years War, culminating in the battle of Agincourt. This was edited together from a number of sources; I make no claim to any copyrighted material, and this video is intended strictly for classroom use.
Part 2 is here:
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Battle Stack: The Battle Of Agincourt tactics

The Battle of Agincourt took place in 1415 and was between England and France during the Hundred Years War. Find out what happened with this animated tactics video!

Please LIKE & SUBSCRIBE! Thanks for watching!

Other Battles -

The Spanish Armada -

Battle of Marathon -

Battle of Bunker Hill -

Battle of Isandlwana -

Battle of Cannae -

Battle of Bannockburn -

Agincourt 1415 Teaser Trailer



On the 25th October 1415 Henry Vs small and dispirited Anglo/Welsh Army destroyed a vast French Army at Azincourt. This programme looks at not just this iconic battle immortalised by Shakespeare and many other authors but the campaign that led up to this final great English victory of the 100 Years War when the Yeoman of England reigned supreme on the field of battle.

Unlike the Crecy campaign of his great grandfather Edward III this campaign nearly ended in disaster. England had been weakened by civil war and plague. Henry's English Army did not have the experience and leadership of that of his great grandfather however it despite its weaknesses it still was to prove superior to the over proud French Army riven with jealousy and pride. Although the initial landings and encirclement of Harfleur went well the siege dragged on and the “Bloody Flux” the scourge of many a medieval army struck the English. Although they successfully captured Harfleur the army that was left was a shadow of its former self. Henry's attempts to march to Calais were beset with problems as the French Army stalked him aiming to bring him to battle and destroy him and his socially inferior army.

Once again the English victory on the field of Agincourt was a demonstration of the French genetic ability to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. As at Crecy the courage, discipline and steadfastness of the mainly yeoman Anglo/Welsh aided by the use of the longbow turned the massive and magnificent French Army, into a bloody ruin.

This victory would allow him to achieve his political aim, however it was only Henry's early death in 1422 which stopped the English in uniting England and France under an English King.
In this programme, the BHTV team use their experience as soldiers and guides to bring this iconic campaign to life. The team examines the political, military and economic background to the campaign and brings the subject to life by visits to all the major locations, skilful use of maps and complimented by re-enactment footage and vignettes of life and combat in 1415
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Medieval Dead - Season 1, Episode 3: Agincourt's Lost Dead

It was one of English history’s most celebrated victories. In the year 1415, an English army, outnumbered and weakened by illness somehow defeated a much larger French army which had the flower of the country’s nobility at its head.

Perhaps 7000 French noblemen fell that day and were buried in mass graves. Bodies and graves mark the spot of almost every other battlefield of the period – so why have the dead of Agincourt never been found?

Tim Sutherland’s research and scientific study leads him to think he knows the answer and that he is able to identify where the hidden dead of Agincourt are buried. Now he’s going to try and confirm his theory.

This is a wonderful medieval tale of mystery that takes us from the North of France to the Midlands of England. Along with their ultra-modern forensic equipment, the team is armed with evidence provided by Colonel Woodford, a veteran of the battle of Waterloo and the man who Tim believes is the only other person in history to have known the truth about the dead of Agincourt.

Woodford had his evidence and his artifacts buried in a church….the perfect end destination for this episode featuring the Medieval Dead team.

Agincourt - TV Documentary

Television documentary about the famous Battle of Agincourt in 1415.

She Wolves, England's Early Queens: 02 Jane, Mary, & Elizabeth

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Helen Castor - Medieval Marriage

Agincourt: Myths and Misconceptions

In October 2015 we marked the 600th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt, a pivotal moment in English history. Yet for such a key moment, the popular understanding of the battle is heavily distorted. In this film, Tobias Capwell, our Curator of Arms and ‪Armour‬, explores the myths around Agincourt, and reveals the real story of this fascinating but sobering moment in history.

Film by Ben Harvey, music by Alex Painter.

25th October 1415: The Battle of Agincourt is fought

On the 25th October 1415, the English king Henry V celebrated a major victory in the Hundred Years War when he defeated the numerically superior French army at the Battle of Agincourt. Famous for its use of English and Welsh longbowmen, the battle is also falsely claimed to provide the origin for the so-called ‘two finger salute’, the V sign that is used as an offensive gesture in England.

Having landed in northern France on the 13th August, Henry sought to regain control of lands that had once come under the rule of the English kings. However, the time taken to capture the town of Harfleur meant that Henry was not able to mount an effective attack on the French. Instead the English marched to Calais as a ‘show of force’, but were shadowed by the French who continued to raise an army en-route. By the 24th October both armies had gathered at Agincourt, and in the morning of the 25th Henry began the battle.

Henry’s archers launched an initial volley that incapacitated many of the French army’s horses and forward troops. As well as struggling to find a way through this mass and across the muddy field that separated them from the English, the French cavalry was unable to advance efficiently due to stakes driven into the ground to protect the English archers. The French advance became more and more densely packed, making the forward French knights less and less able to fight efficiently. Over 8,000 French troops are estimated to have been killed in the battle. The English army’s losses were less than 500.

Battle of Agincourt 1415

This project was created with Explain Everything™ Interactive Whiteboard for iPad.

The Battle of Agincourt 1415 - The Triumph of the Longbow

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