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Beauty and Truth in Mathematics and Science

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Lecture I - Beauty and Truth in Mathematics and Science

Robert May, Baron May of Oxford; Professor, Zoology, Oxford University and Imperial College
October 2, 2012

2012 Stanislaw Ulam Memorial Lectures

May explores the extent to which beauty has guided, and still guides, humanity's quest to understand how the world works, with a brief look at the interactions among beliefs, values, beauty, truth, and our expectations for tomorrow's world.

Dirac Lecture 2011 - Beauty and truth:their intersection in mathematics and science

Please watch: UNSWTV: Entertaining your curiosity

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Lord Robert M. May Zoology Department, Oxford University, supported by the Royal Society of NSW & Australian Institute of Physics.

In the mists of prehistory, it seems clear that our ancestors sought to make sense of their world through myth and magic, memorably associated with evocative cave paintings, stone circles, and the like. The Greeks attempt to understand the motions of heavenly bodies were constrained by essentially aesthetic ideas about the perfection of circles. Did the advent of the experimental method overturn this conjunction of truth with beauty? Dirac's equation speaks eloquently and amazingly to a contrary view. My talk will cover this general ground in an opinionated way.
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Lecture I - Beauty and Truth in Mathematics and Science - YouTube

School of Theoretical Physics Statutory Public Lecture “Beauty and Truth in Mathematics and Physics”

Prof. Arthur Jaffe (Landon T. Clay Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Science at Harvard University) recently gave the Statutory Public Lecture of the School of Theoretical Physics, DIAS. The lecture was held on Wednesday 18th May in the Schrodinger Lecture Theatre at Trinity College Dublin. Professor Jaffe is also Chair of the Governing Board of the School of Theoretical Physics, DIAS.
Abstract:

Beauty, commonly accepted in the arts, is also central both in mathematics and in physics. In both disciplines one also strives to discover truth. But beauty and truth can have different meanings for a physicist and for a mathematician! We discuss how one might reconcile these contrasting views.

Bio:

Arthur M. Jaffe is the Landon T. Clay Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Science at Harvard University. His major research focuses on understanding quantum physics and the mathematics that it inspires. For his research in showing the mathematical compatibility of quantum theory with special relativity (by giving examples of non-linear fields in two and three dimensions), he received the Dannie Heineman Prize in Mathematical Physics, and the Physical Sciences Prize of the New York Academy of Science, jointly with James Glimm. In 1983 he authored the highly quoted essay “Ordering the Universe” for the US National Research Council, written to give intellectual justification for funding research in mathematics. In 1993 he wrote the essay “Theoretical Mathematics” with Frank Quinn, describing recent interactions between mathematics and theoretical physics. One year after its publication, the Bulletin of the AMS devoted an entire issue to discussion of that article.

Jaffe served as president of International Association of Mathematical Physics for two consecutive terms, and of the American Mathematical Society during 1997/1998. He conceived and guided the conception of the Clay Mathematics Institute, including serving as its first President 1998-2002, when he was responsible for the “Millennium Prize Problems in Mathematics.” Since 2005 he has chaired the Board of the DIAS School of Theoretical Physics. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and an Honorary Member of the RIA.
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Beauty and Truth in Mathematics; a Tribute to Albert Einstein and Hermann Weyl - Sir Michael Atiyah

Sir Michael Atiyah
Institute for Advanced Study
November 8, 2010

For more videos, visit

Lecture I Beauty and Truth in Mathematics and Science YouTube - The Best Documentary Ever

Robert , Baron of Oxford; Professor, Zoology, Oxford University and Imperial College 2, 2017 2017 Stanislaw Ulam Memorial Lectures .

Please watch: UNSWTV: Entertaining your curiosity -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Lord Robert M. Zoology .



Prof. Arthur Jaffe (Landon T. Clay Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Science at Harvard University) recently gave the Statutory Public Lecture of the .

Sir Michael Atiyah Institute for Advanced Study 8, 2017 For more videos, visit .
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Lecture I Beauty and Truth in Mathematics and Science

Robert May, Baron May of Oxford; Professor, Zoology, Oxford University and Imperial College October 2, 2017 2017 Stanislaw Ulam Memorial Lectures May explores the extent to which beauty has.

Please watch: UNSWTV: Entertaining your curiosity -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Lord Robert M. May Zoology Department, Oxford University, supported by the.



Prof. Arthur Jaffe (Landon T. Clay Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Science at Harvard University) recently gave the Statutory Public Lecture of the School of Theoretical Physics, DIAS..

Beauty and Truth in Mathematics

Relationship between beauty and truth in mathematics and science

Lecture I Beauty and Truth in Mathematics and Science YouTube

Robert , Baron of Oxford; Professor, Zoology, Oxford University and Imperial College 2, 2017 2017 Stanislaw Ulam Memorial Lectures explores the extent to which beauty has.

Please watch: UNSWTV: Entertaining your curiosity -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Lord Robert M. Zoology Department, Oxford University, supported by the.



Prof. Arthur Jaffe (Landon T. Clay Professor of Mathematics and Theoretical Science at Harvard University) recently gave the Statutory Public Lecture of the School of Theoretical Physics, DIAS..

Murray Gell-Mann: Beauty and truth in physics

Armed with a sense of humor and laypeople's terms, Nobel winner Murray Gell-Mann drops some knowledge on TEDsters about particle physics, asking questions like, Are elegant equations more likely to be right than inelegant ones?

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers are invited to give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes -- including speakers such as Jill Bolte Taylor, Sir Ken Robinson, Hans Rosling, Al Gore and Arthur Benjamin. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, and Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, politics and the arts. Watch the Top 10 TEDTalks on TED.com, at
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Can Math Be Beautiful?

What is it about Euclid's infinite primes that rocks Simon Singh's world? What makes math different from the rest of the sciences? Listen as he and mathematician Marcus du Sautoy explain why, to them, math is a language of beauty, creativity, and immortality—for its unshakable proofs allow you to truly stand solidly on the shoulders of giants.

Watch the Full Program Here:
Original Program Date: June 3, 2011

The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Our mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future.

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Mathematician Shares 'Secret Universe' of Patterns, Beauty, Interconnectedness

Cornell professors are often sought after by the media for their expertise and passion. Steven Strogatz communicates the beauty of math not only to students but also to the public via books, TED Talks and publications like the New York Times. Watch the video...
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Proof That 1+1=3 fool Your Friends with Beauty Of Mathematics | Part-2

Proof That 1+1=3 fool Your Friends with Beauty Of Mathematics | Part-2

This is second video of Beauty Of Mathematics
In this video we proof 1+1=3, Which is not correct but we can fool our friends with this method of maths.

Katie Mack on the Beauty of Math Representing Reality

On Doubt in Creative Processes: Become a Patron now:

This project publishes long-form interviews with creative minds of all fields. Here's a trailer of Katie Mack ( - a theoretical astrophysicist whom I met in London in September 2017.

In the complete interview (to be published soon), Katie starts off about how she imagined being an astrophysicist when still a child, and spans an arc to her current situation - where she's about to start tenure. The discussion is filled with opinions and anecdotes about failure and success , about the human element pervading scientific approaches, the challenges of academic career structures and structural problems in sciences.

Michael Atiyah Beauty in Mathematics

Michael Atiyah, one of the worlds foremost mathematicians, talks about beauty in mathematics, which he defines as simplicity, elegance and truth per word, and explains why it is such an important criterion. Peoples Archive is dedicated to collecting for posterity the life stories of the great thinkers, creators and achievers of our time. The people whose stories we present are leaders of their field, whose work has influenced and changed our world. Look out for more of our stories on Google Video or visit our site to explore the wealth of our content through our Science, Film, Masters, Literature and Medicine sections with new speakers added regularly.

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The Science of Beauty - Sir Michael Atiyah

A talk on The Role of Beauty in Mathematics as part of Science of Beauty Conference.

Cedric Villani: The Hidden Beauty of Mathematics | Spring 2017 Wall Exchange

It has been said that mathematics is the poetry of science. Professor Cédric Villani discusses the interface between mathematics and art, showing how both these disciplines seek to illuminate hidden beauty in the world.

Cédric Villani visited Vancouver to deliver the spring 2017 Wall Exchange lecture. Prof. Villani is a specialist of mathematical analysis applied to problems of statistical physics, geometry and probability. His books on gas theory and optimal transport theory have become classics. Prof. Villani has received many mathematical awards, including the Fields Medal in 2010, often considered the most prestigious in mathematics.

The Wall Exchange lecture was co-sponsored by the Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences.

Beauty of mathematics and mathematical tricks and mathematical equation in our life

Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music.

Robbert Dijkgraaf Module 1: Truth and Beauty

Module 1: Robbert Dijkgraaf -- Truth and Beauty

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Module 1: Truth and Beauty —Review

The theme of unification is an ever-present one in science.

- We see the incredible power of ideas to unify many physical phenomena.

- Scientists throughout history have often remarked on the tension that exists between beautiful ideas and the reality of nature.

Attempts at devising a “theory of everything” date back to the ancient Greeks.

- They developed the platonic solids, five geometrical objects representing the elements that made up everything.

- In the late 16th century, astronomer Johannes Kepler took the five platonic solids and fit them together in a specific way. He was able to find (within 5% accuracy) the ratio of the orbits of the planets in our solar system.

- The theory wouldn’t have held up for many reasons; for instance, there were only six known planets at the time. However, Kepler himself disproved his own theory by careful observations, when he discovered that planetary orbits were in fact ellipses.

- Though Kepler thought his theory of elliptical orbits was an ugly one, there is a beautiful mathematical formalism for ellipses as conic sections.

Scientists continued to unify the complex into simple, elegant concepts.

- Newton was truly a unifier of concepts—he unified the everyday physics (the falling apple) with the movement of the planets.

- Another example was Herschel’s discovery of infrared light in 1800, akin to discovering a new particle today. This led to unification of radiation, the realization that all kinds of radiation, including visible light, were different manifestations of the same physical phenomena.

- Maxwell and Faraday were largely responsible for unifying the concepts of electricity and magnetism.

- Einstein’s contributions to physics were also a unification—namely that of space and time.

Einstein’s unifications are crucial in understanding modern theories of particle physics.

- Time is the fourth dimension we perceive. Objects moving in both space and time create a world line as they travel.

- Physicists look at the world lines as physical reality—the history of a particle’s space and time represented all at once.

- This becomes challenging in modern particle physics. The mathematics underpinning particle behavior was once thought of as a “black box.”

- Beautiful and elegant, this formula represents the entirety of the physical implications we observe.

Mathematics as Hidden Reality - Edward Frenkel, Ph.D.

There's a secret world out there. A hidden parallel universe of beauty and elegance, intricately intertwined with ours. And it's invisible to most of us.

Imagine that you had to take an art class in which they taught you only how to paint a fence or a wall, but never showed you the paintings of the great masters. Alas, this is how math is taught, and so for most of us it becomes the intellectual equivalent of watching paint dry. Edward Frenkel wants to open this secret world to all of us because it can teach us so much about the mysteries of the Universe. In this talk, he weaves the discovery of math with his personal journey, addressing the existential questions of finding out who we are; of truth, courage, and passion.

Edward Frenkel is a professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley, which he joined in 1997 after being on the faculty at Harvard University. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society, and the winner of the Hermann Weyl Prize in mathematical physics. Frenkel has authored three books and over eighty scholarly articles in academic journals, and he has lectured on his work around the world. His YouTube videos have garnered over 3 million views combined.

Frenkel’s latest book Love and Math was a New York Times bestseller and has been named one of the Best Books of 2013 by both Amazon and iBooks. It is being translated into 14 languages. Frenkel has also co-produced, co-directed and played the lead in the film Rites of Love and Math (2010).

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