Education For Whom and For What

Education For Whom and For What?

Noam Chomsky, a world-renowned linguist, intellectual and political activist, spoke at the University of Arizona on Feb. 8, 2012. His lecture, Education: For Whom and For What? featured a talk on the state of higher education, followed by a question-and-answer session.

Chomsky, an Institute Professor and a Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he worked for more than 50 years, has been concerned with a range of education-related issues in recent years. Among them: How do we characterize the contemporary state of the American education system? What happens to the quality of education when public universities become more privatized? Are public universities in danger of being converted into facilities that produce graduates-as-commodities for the job market? What is the role of activism in education? With unprecedented tuition increases and budget struggles occurring across American campuses, these are questions that are more relevant than ever.

Noam Chomsky - The Purpose of Education

Noam Chomsky discusses the purpose of education, impact of technology, whether education should be perceived as a cost or an investment and the value of standardised assessment.

Presented at the Learning Without Frontiers Conference - Jan 25th 2012- London (LWF 12)



credits:
Interviewed & directed by Graham Brown-Martin
Filmed & edited by Kevin Grant at wildtraxtv (

Noam Chomsky: Education For Whom and For What

Noam Chomsky: Education For Whom and For What

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Noam Chomsky: Education For Whom and For What

Noam Chomsky, a world-renowned linguist, intellectual and political activist, spoke at the University of Arizona on Feb. 8, 2012. His lecture, Education: For Whom and For What? featured a talk on the state of higher education, followed by a question-and-answer session.

Chomsky, an Institute Professor and a Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he worked for more than 50 years, has been concerned with a range of education-related issues in recent years. Among them: How do we characterize the contemporary state of the American education system? What happens to the quality of education when public universities become more privatized? Are public universities in danger of being converted into facilities that produce graduates-as-commodities for the job market? What is the role of activism in education? With unprecedented tuition increases and budget struggles occurring across American campuses, these are questions that are more relevant than ever.

Video by Arizona Public Media.

Education Is a System of Indoctrination of the Young - Noam Chomsky

Chomsky has been known to vigorously defend and debate his views and opinions, in philosophy, linguistics, and politics. More Chomsky:

He has had notable debates with Jean Piaget, Michel Foucault, William F. Buckley, Jr., Christopher Hitchens, George Lakoff, Richard Perle, Hilary Putnam, Willard Quine, and Alan Dershowitz, to name a few. In response to his speaking style being criticized as boring, Chomsky said that I'm a boring speaker and I like it that way.... I doubt that people are attracted to whatever the persona is.... People are interested in the issues, and they're interested in the issues because they are important. We don't want to be swayed by superficial eloquence, by emotion and so on.

In early 1969, he delivered the John Locke Lectures at Oxford University; in January 1970, the Bertrand Russell Memorial Lecture at University of Cambridge; in 1972, the Nehru Memorial Lecture in New Delhi; in 1977, the Huizinga Lecture in Leiden; in 1988 the Massey Lectures at the University of Toronto, titled Necessary Illusions: Thought Control in Democratic Societies; in 1997, The Davie Memorial Lecture on Academic Freedom in Cape Town, and many others.

He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. In addition, he is a member of other professional and learned societies in the United States and abroad, and is a recipient of the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, the Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences, the Helmholtz Medal, the Dorothy Eldridge Peacemaker Award, the 1999 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science, and others. He is twice winner of The Orwell Award, granted by The National Council of Teachers of English for Distinguished Contributions to Honesty and Clarity in Public Language (in 1987 and 1989).

He is a member of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Department of Social Sciences.

In 2005, Chomsky received an honorary fellowship from the Literary and Historical Society. In 2007, Chomsky received The Uppsala University (Sweden) Honorary Doctor's degree in commemoration of Carolus Linnaeus. In February 2008, he received the President's Medal from the Literary and Debating Society of the National University of Ireland, Galway. Since 2009 he is an honorary member of IAPTI.

In 2010, Chomsky received the Erich Fromm Prize in Stuttgart, Germany. In April 2010, Chomsky became the third scholar to receive the University of Wisconsin's A.E. Havens Center's Award for Lifetime Contribution to Critical Scholarship.

Chomsky has an Erdős number of four.

Chomsky was voted the leading living public intellectual in The 2005 Global Intellectuals Poll conducted by the British magazine Prospect. He reacted, saying I don't pay a lot of attention to polls. In a list compiled by the magazine New Statesman in 2006, he was voted seventh in the list of Heroes of our time.

Actor Viggo Mortensen with avant-garde guitarist Buckethead dedicated their 2006 album, called Pandemoniumfromamerica, to Chomsky.

On January 22, 2010, a special honorary concert for Chomsky was given at Kresge Auditorium at MIT. The concert, attended by Chomsky and dozens of his family and friends, featured music composed by Edward Manukyan and speeches by Chomsky's colleagues, including David Pesetsky of MIT and Gennaro Chierchia, head of the linguistics department at Harvard University.

In June 2011, Chomsky was awarded the Sydney Peace Prize, which cited his unfailing courage, critical analysis of power and promotion of human rights.

In 2011, Chomsky was inducted into IEEE Intelligent Systems' AI's Hall of Fame for the significant contributions to the field of AI and intelligent systems.

Most Schooling Is Training for Stupidity and Conformity - Noam Chomsky on Education

Avram Noam Chomsky (born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist, historian, and activist. More Chomsky:

He is an Institute Professor and Professor (Emeritus) in the Department of Linguistics & Philosophy at MIT, where he has worked for over 50 years. Chomsky has been described as the father of modern linguistics and a major figure of analytic philosophy. His work has influenced fields such as computer science, mathematics, and psychology.

Ideologically identifying with anarcho-syndicalism and libertarian socialism, Chomsky is known for his critiques of U.S. foreign policy and contemporary capitalism, and he has been described as a prominent cultural figure. His media criticism has included Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988), co-written with Edward S. Herman, an analysis articulating the propaganda model theory for examining the media.

According to the Arts and Humanities Citation Index in 1992, Chomsky was cited as a source more often than any other living scholar from 1980 to 1992, and was the eighth most cited source overall. Chomsky is the author of over 100 books. He is credited as the creator or co-creator of the Chomsky hierarchy, the universal grammar theory, and the Chomsky--Schützenberger theorem.

Chomsky sees science as a straightforward search for explanation, and rejects the views of it as a catalog of facts or mechanical explanations. In this light, the majority of his contributions to science have been frameworks and hypotheses, rather than discoveries.

As such, he considers certain so-called post-structuralist or postmodern critiques of logic and reason to be nonsensical:

I have spent a lot of my life working on questions such as these, using the only methods I know of; those condemned here as science, rationality, logic, and so on. I therefore read the papers with some hope that they would help me transcend these limitations, or perhaps suggest an entirely different course. I'm afraid I was disappointed. Admittedly, that may be my own limitation. Quite regularly, my eyes glaze over when I read polysyllabic discourse on the themes of poststructuralism and postmodernism; what I understand is largely truism or error, but that is only a fraction of the total word count. True, there are lots of other things I don't understand: the articles in the current issues of math and physics journals, for example. But there is a difference. In the latter case, I know how to get to understand them, and have done so, in cases of particular interest to me; and I also know that people in these fields can explain the contents to me at my level, so that I can gain what (partial) understanding I may want. In contrast, no one seems to be able to explain to me why the latest post-this-and-that is (for the most part) other than truism, error, or gibberish, and I do not know how to proceed.

Although Chomsky believes that a scientific background is important to teach proper reasoning, he holds that science in general is inadequate to understand complicated problems like human affairs:

Science talks about very simple things, and asks hard questions about them. As soon as things become too complex, science can't deal with them... But it's a complicated matter: Science studies what's at the edge of understanding, and what's at the edge of understanding is usually fairly simple. And it rarely reaches human affairs. Human affairs are way too complicated.

use of Who whom whose of which which that by Sumit Sir (Nik Education)

use of Who whom whose of which which that by Sumit Sir (Nik Education)

TED Talks Education

Found on:

Hear inspiring leaders on the topic of learning in this TED project hosted by John Legend.

Hear inspiring and forward-looking leaders and thinkers on the topic of learning, including Dr. Angela Lee Duckworth, Bill Gates, Rita F. Pierson, Sir Ken Robinson and Geoffrey Canada, among others. Hosted by John Legend, this special focused solely on education marks the first TED project produced specifically for television.

Education For Whom and For What? #209

Discussion Video Series: Philosophy of Education

What is your Philosophy of Education? What is the Role of the Instructor and Student? Three University of Lethbridge Faculty members discuss their views and passion for teaching and learning. Featuring: Robin Bright (Education), Ute Kothe (Chemistry & Biochemistry), and Hillary Rodrigues (Religious Studies).

Noam Chomsky on the Purpose of Education

original:

music by Jacekdupa

David Hansen's Lecture: Is Education Possible Today?

David Hansen's Weinberg lecture poses the question whether education is possible today. He addresses three prevalent responses to the question: (1) that it is obviously possible since we can see all around us teachers and students working in classrooms, (2) that it is obviously not possible because the educational system has been subverted to serve the ends of a global economic order, and (3) that education remains possible because of the inextinguishable human quest for meaning even in the face of unjust societal conditions. Hansen also argues that while there is evidence to support the three responses, they all in eff ect dismiss the question of education's possibility and thus undermine its authentic enactment. Hansen suggests that the question of education is the one question we need to keep open in order to ensure the continuation of education itself. David Hansen was recently named the John L. and Sue Ann Weinberg Professor in the Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education at Teachers College. His books include the widely cited The Call to Teach (1995), Exploring the Moral Heart of Teaching (2001), Ethical Visions of Education (2007), and most recently The Teacher and the World (2011).

David Hansen is a Past-President of the John Dewey Society and of the Philosophy of Education Society, and is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. He is currently leading a funded three-year-long inquiry, alongside sixteen teachers from New York City schools, that is entitled What does it mean to be a person in the world today?

Education for Whom? Trailer

Education For Whom and For What - Noam Chomsky Quotes

John Dewey Experience and Education: a brief summary

John Dewey. Looking over 1938 work, Experience and Education. This video is a quick summary of Dewey's views on education and experiential learning. This book looks at the arguments between traditional and progressive extremes of education and offer a solution for what schools should be.

Corporate Attack on Education, Chomsky

Noam Chomsky talks of the longstanding hostility of the rich to truly educating the public so they don't realize they are victims of an economic system they need to replace with one that truly serves the public. March 16, 2012 Special thanks to Rev. Rhonda Rubinson of St. Philip's Church of Harlem for facilitating this production. Camera, Joe Friendly.

Education For Whom and For What - Noam Chomsky Quotes

Racing To The Precipice.

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