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The Road to Hell? Intentions, Uncertainty and the Origins of World War I, Dr. Sebastian Rosato

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The Great WWI Controversy: Who Was to Blame? A Panel Discussion on the Centennial

The origins of the First World War have aroused deep controversy for decades. On the centennial of the war, there is renewed interest in revisiting its origins. Was Germany to blame? Did Europe’s statesmen sleepwalk to war? In this panel discussion, leading historians and IR experts will weigh in on the debate and offer lessons for avoiding another great power conflict.

Graham Allison: Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Peter Gourevitch: Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego
Charles S. Maier: Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History, Harvard University
Thomas Weber: Professor of History and International Affairs, University of Aberdeen; Visiting Scholar, CES
Chaired by: Alison Frank Johnson: Professor of History, Harvard University

Monday, Nov 24th, 2014
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D-Day: The Greatest Generation Remembers WWII - Dr. Mark DePue

6/27/19

Dr. Mark DePue discusses D-day, at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum's Union Theater.

Oral History Website:


D-Day Video From 2019 WWII exhibit at ALPLM:


ALPLM Website:


Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation:


Twitter @ALPLM
Facebook: /Lincoln.Museum
Instagram: LincolnMuseum
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Dr. Mark DePue Discusses America's Involvement in World War I (June 21, 2018)

Dr. Mark DePue discussed the events of 1918 on the Western Front, with emphasis on the German Spring Offensive and America’s new and relatively untrained Army.
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Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of War, 1914 - Michael Neiberg

Michael Neiberg, US Army War College

The common explanation for the outbreak of World War I depicts Europe as a minefield of nationalism, needing only the slightest pressure to set off an explosion of passion that would rip the continent apart. This talk will present a crucial reexamination of the outbreak of violence in 1914. It will show that ordinary Europeans, unlike their political and military leaders, neither wanted nor expected war during that fateful summer. By training our eyes on the ways that people outside the halls of power reacted to the rapid onset and escalation of the fighting, this talk dispels the notion that Europeans were rabid nationalists intent on mass slaughter. It reveals instead a complex set of allegiances that cut across national boundaries.

Lecture presented during the 15th Annual Truman Library Teachers' Conference at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
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The Forgotten Realm on the Eve of the Great War: Austria-Hungary in July 1914 - John Deak

Dr. John Deak, University of Notre Dame, discusses the Austro-Hungarian Empire during July of 1914, challenging traditional concepts of Austria-Hungary's doomed existence and the conglomerate state's complex position in Eastern Europe.

The lecture is part of the Hesburgh Lecture Series and is presented in partnership with the Notre Dame Club of Kansas City.

Recorded April 13, 2014 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum and Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Hard Knocks, Hard Luck, and Hardscrabble: The U.S. Army Enters World War I - Richard Faulkner

Richard S. Faulkner, U.S. Command and General Staff College

When the United States entered World War I in April 1917 the total strength of the Regular Army and National Guard was just over 300,000 men. It was an army with the doctrine, technology, and mindset of a pre-1914 constabulary force. By the time the war ended in November 1918, the U.S. Army had grown to over four million soldiers, had endured the growing pains of a prodigious mobilization, and had been schooled in the hard lessons of modern total war. This presentation will examine the challenges that the U.S. Army faced in raising, training, equipping, and employing the American Expeditionary Forces in the Great War.

Lecture presented during the 15th Annual Truman Library Teachers' Conference at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Pershing Lecture Series: The AEF in Battle: September to November 1918 - Richard S. Faulkner

Join award-winning historian Richard S. Faulkner for a discussion of how pivotal engagements, including the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, shaped the outcome of the war. Take an in-depth look at the actions of this crucial time and explore the enduring impact of the year of the Armistice.

This lecture is part of the John J. Pershing Great War Centennial Series presented in partnership with the Command and General Staff College Foundation.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

The Outbreak of War in 1914: A New Look at an Old Problem - Michael Neiberg

Michael Neiberg was a featured speaker at A Century in the Shadow of the Great War, an International Centennial Planning Conference held at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial in Kansas City in March 2013.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Sean McMeekin | July 1914: Countdown to War - January 29, 2014

In a discussion of his new book, historian Sean McMeekin reveals how a small cabal of European statesmen used the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand to initiate a long-awaited showdown among the Continent's powers, ultimately leading to the start of World War I.

The Path to War: How the First World War Created Modern America - Michael Neiberg

Michael Neiberg, US Army War College

The First World War transformed the United States into a financial powerhouse and global player, despite the reassertion of isolationism in the years that followed. Examining the social, political, and financial forces at work as well as the role of public opinion and popular culture, The Path to War offers both a compelling narrative and the inescapable conclusion that World War One was no parenthetical exception in the American story but a moment of national self-determination.

Lecture presented during the 15th Annual Truman Library Teachers' Conference at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

For more information visit
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Industrial Behemoth, Cultural Icon, Corrupted Arbiter: Press of the Gilded Age - Ross Collins

Dr. Ross Collins, historian and author of Children, War, and Propaganda, discusses the power and venality of the Gilded Age industrial journalism in three of the most powerful allied nations: France, Britain, and the United States.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

The Road to Hell? Intentions, Uncertainty and the Origins of World War I - Sebastian Rosato

A century after the outbreak of World War I, there is still little consensus on its causes. The lessons learned are of particular importance for the United States and the world today. University of Notre Dame Professor Sebastian Rosato specializes in the theory and history of great power politics and will question established explanations and develop new arguments about the causes of the Great War.

The event is part of the Hesburgh Lecture Series and is presented in partnership with the Notre Dame Club of Kansas City.

Recorded April 19, 2015 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Germany and the Outbreak of WWI Reconsidered - Michael Epkenhans

Dr. Michael Epkenhans, professor and Director of Historical Research at the Centre for Military History and Social Sciences of the German Armed Forces at Potsdam, presents, Germany and the Outbreak of WWI Reconsidered.

Presented July 27, 2014 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Dr. Mark DePue Discusses Films on the Civil War - October 8, 2015

The Civil War has inspired more movies than any other event in America's history, except for WWII. But like so much about the Civil War, the frictions between North and South​ linger on in our most popular cultural art form. Dr. Mark DePue examines how Hollywood's portrayal of the Civil War has evolved over the last 100 years.

Who's Trying To Destroy The Presidency And Start A World War With Russia

On September 9, 2017 at 1 pm Eastern in NYC, EIR Magazine hosted an event featuring two members of the VIPS (Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity). Forensic studies of “Russian hacking” into Democratic National Committee computers last year reveal that on July 5, 2016, data was leaked (not hacked) by a person with physical access to DNC computers, and then doctored to incriminate Russia. After examining meta data from the “Guccifer 2.0” July 5, 2016 intrusion into the DNC server, independent cyber investigators have concluded that an insider copied DNC data onto an external storage device, and that “telltale signs” implicating Russia were then inserted. [i]-Excerpted from Memorandum to the President, From: Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS), July 24, 2017
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Poilu: The Notebooks of Corporal Louis Barthas - Edward Strauss

“If we suffered so stoically, without raising useless complaints, don’t let anyone tell you that it was because of patriotism, or to defend the rights of peoples to live their own lives, or to end all wars…”

Along with millions of other Frenchmen, Louis Barthas, was conscripted to fight the Germans in the opening days of World War I. Ed Strauss, former publisher of MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History, vividly brings Barthas’ frontline experiences to life through the first English translation of his notebooks, which describe riveting wartime experiences of near-ceaseless combat in some of the fiercest French battles: Artois, Flanders, Champagne, Verdun, the Somme and the Argonne. This quintessential memoir of a “poilu,” is a journey directly into the heart of the Great War.

Recorded March 4, 2015 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Domination and Betrayal - WWI and the Modern World

The Great War signaled the terminal crisis of the European old regime–a crisis more than a century in the making. Pursuing the story of this crisis across themes of domination, integration and betrayal, UW History Professor Raymond Jonas considers the rivalries that underpinned the war and the bleak geopolitical thinking that informed them. Professor Jonas explores the political culture that obliterated tolerance for difference, finding the foundations of power in nation and race. Finally, he asks us to ponder the responsibilities of the powerful, viewed with the eyes of the young men they had persuaded to fight.

Raymond Jonas
UW Professor of History
11/5/14

Ever Present Danger: Churchill, the Rise of German Power & the Outbreak of the First World War

Dr. John Maurer, United States Naval War College, presents, Ever Present Danger: Winston Churchill, the Rise of German Power, and the Outbreak of the First World War. Presented at the National World War I Museum, in cooperation with The Churchill Centre.

Recorded October 9, 2014 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

The Evolution of Warfare to 1914 - Nicholas Murray

Dr. Nicholas Murray, historian and author of The Rocky Road to the Great War: The Evolution of Trench Warfare to 1914, discusses the evolution of defensive and offensive tactics and armaments in the lead up to the Great War, including the experience of armies in wars during the decades leading up to World War I and how this experience shaped tactical thinking at the start of the war.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Ottoman Entry into WWI: Politics, Nationalism and Diplomacy - Lisa Adeli

Lisa Adeli, the National Council for Social Studies 2012 Global Education award recipient, develops programs for the University of Arizona Center for Middle Eastern Studies, primarily for K-12 students and for educators. Adeli specializes in Ottoman and Balkan history with a special interest in World War I, with academic degrees from Georgetown, Indiana University and the University of Arizona.

When the Great War erupted, the Ottoman Empire was already depleted from years of conflict in the Balkans and elsewhere. Why, then, were the Ottomans so quick to join the Central Powers in early November 1914? The immediate answers involve internal Ottoman politics and a struggle for dominance within the Young Turk ruling elite. This presentation examines the Ottoman decision within the broader context of European relations and the challenges caused by the rise of competing forms of nationalism within the Empire, issues which shape the history of the Middle East throughout the war and the century that followed.

Presented November 7, 2014 as part of the National World War I Museum and United States World War I Centennial Commission 2014 Symposium, 1914: Global War & American Neutrality.

The Symposium was held in association with The Western Front Association East Coast Branch and the World War I Historical Association. Sponsored by Colonel J's, the Neighborhood Tourist Development Fund and Verlag Militaria.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

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