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1. Introduction to Human Behavioral Biology

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1. Introduction to Human Behavioral Biology

(March 29, 2010) Stanford professor Robert Sapolsky gave the opening lecture of the course entitled Human Behavioral Biology and explains the basic premise of the course and how he aims to avoid categorical thinking.

Stanford University


Stanford Department of Biology


Stanford University Channel on YouTube

2. Behavioral Evolution

(March 31, 2010) Stanford professor Robert Sapolsky lectures on the biology of behavioral evolution and thoroughly discusses examples such as The Prisoner's Dilemma.

Stanford University


Stanford Department of Biology


Stanford University Channel on YouTube
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3. Behavioral Evolution II

(April 2, 2010) Robert Sapolsky continues his two-part series on evolution focusing on individual and kin selection, behavioral logic, competitive infanticide, male/female animal hierarchies, sex-ratio fluctuation, intersexual competition, imprinted genes, sperm competition, inbred-founder populations, group and multi-level selection, and punctuated equilibrium.


Stanford University


Stanford Department of Biology


Stanford University Channel on YouTube

4. Molecular Genetics I

(April 5, 2010) Robert Sapolsky makes interdisciplinary connections between behavioral biology and molecular genetic influences. He relates protein synthesis and point mutations to microevolutionary change, and discusses conflicting theories of gradualism and punctuated equilibrium and the influence of epigenetics on development theories.

Stanford University


Stanford Department of Biology


Stanford University Channel on YouTube
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Robert Sapolsky on science, morality, religion and human behavioral biology [Vert Dider] 2017

In February 2017, Professor in Stanford University and author of Human Behavioral Biology lectures Robert Sapolsky gave an interview to Vert Dider, where he answered questions from subscribers on science, religion, morality and the most interesting aspects of human behavior.

1 Introduction to Human Behavioral Biology

Excerpt For Cultural Linguistics project
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01 - Introduction to Human Behavioral Biology 2012 by Robert Sapolsky at Stanford University

Other course materials including a reading list and lecture summaries can be found on my website at .

15. Human Sexual Behavior I

May 5, 2010) Robert Sapolsky explores behavioral patterns of human reproduction. He focuses on proximal and distal motivations, orgasm and fertility facilitation, non-reproductive sex, hormonal and cerebral sexual functions, and the differences and similarities between humans and animals in various physiological realms.

Stanford University:


Stanford Department of Biology:


Stanford University Channel on YouTube:

The biology of our best and worst selves | Robert Sapolsky

How can humans be so compassionate and altruistic -- and also so brutal and violent? To understand why we do what we do, neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky looks at extreme context, examining actions on timescales from seconds to millions of years before they occurred. In this fascinating talk, he shares his cutting edge research into the biology that drives our worst and best behaviors.

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[PSYC 200] 3. Introduction to Human Behavior

Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 200), Dr. Chris Grace.

Lecture #3: Introduction to Human Behavior.

February 7, 2011.
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1. The Nature of Evolution: Selection, Inheritance, and History

Principles of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior (EEB 122)

The lecture presents an overview of evolutionary biology and its two major components, microevolution and macroevolution. The idea of evolution goes back before Darwin, although Darwin thought of natural selection. Evolution is driven by natural selection, the correlation between organism traits and reproductive success, as well as random drift. The history of life goes back approximately 3.7 billion years to a common ancestor, and is marked with key events that affect all life.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction
03:22 - Chapter 2. History of Evolutionary Studies
15:59 - Chapter 3. Conditions for Natural Selection
21:25 - Chapter 4. The Power of Selection and Adaptation
27:09 - Chapter 5. Drift
31:10 - Chapter 6. History of Life
39:33 - Chapter 7. Conclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

6. Behavioral Genetics I

(April 12, 2010) Robert Sapolsky introduces a two-part series exploring the controversial scientific practice of inferring behavior to genetics. He covers classical techniques in behavior genetics and flaws, the significance of environmental factors, non genetic inheritance of traits, and multigenerational effects and relationship to epigenetic differences.

Stanford University


Stanford Department of Biology


Stanford University Channel on YouTube
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Robert Sapolsky

What drives human behavior? Why do we do what we do? Is free will an illusion? Has civilization made us better? Can we escape our tribal past? These questions are the subject of Stanford biology professor Robert Sapolsky’s new book Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst. Watch him as he explores why we are the way we are and explains why we ultimately do the things we do…for good and for ill.

Robert Sapolsky is a Professor of Biological Sciences and Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University, and a research associate with the Institute of Primate Research at the National Museum of Kenya. As a neuroendocrinologist, he has focused his research on issues of stress and neuron degeneration, as well as gene therapy strategies to help protect susceptible neurons from disease. A MacArthur Fellow, Sapolsky has been called “one of the best scientist-writers of our time” by Oliver Sacks and “one of the finest natural history writers around” by the New York Times. His books include A Primate’s Memoir, The Trouble with Testosterone, Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers, and Monkeyluv: And Other Essays on Our Lives as Animals.


Join the conversation on Twitter: @ArtsJCCSF
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21. Chaos and Reductionism

(May 19, 2010) Professor Robert Sapolsky gives what he calls one of the most difficult lectures of the course about chaos and reductionism. He references a book that he assigned to his students. This lecture focuses on reduction science and breaking things down to their component parts in order to understand them best.

Stanford University:


Stanford Department of Biology:


Stanford University Channel on YouTube:

Lec 1: Introduction to the Science of Human Behavior - I

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11. Introduction to Neuroscience II

(April 23, 2010) Patrick House discusses memories and how they are formed. Dana Turker then lectures about the autonomic nervous system and its functions.

Stanford University


Stanford Department of Biology


Stanford University Channel on YouTube

Stanford CS234: Reinforcement Learning | Winter 2019 | Lecture 1 - Introduction

Professor Emma Brunskill, Stanford University


Professor Emma Brunskill
Assistant Professor, Computer Science
Stanford AI for Human Impact Lab
Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab
Statistical Machine Learning Group

To follow along with the course schedule and syllabus, visit:

To get the latest news on Stanford’s upcoming professional programs in Artificial Intelligence, visit:

To view all online courses and programs offered by Stanford, visit:

Robert Sapolsky: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst

Part of the Science and Society Initiative: A joint project with the Laboratory for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology at Stanford University Medical School. Learn more:

Robert Sapolsky spoke at Stanford on October 24, 2017. He is an extremely talented speaker and teacher whose course at Stanford University is one of the most popular classes on campus. He is the author of several works of nonfiction, including A Primate's Memoir, The Trouble with Testosterone, Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers, and his most recent book Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst. He is a professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University and the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation genius award.

03.5 - Evolution Catch-up I from Human Behavioral Biology 2012 by Robert Sapolsky

Other course materials including a reading list and lecture summaries can be found on my website at .

5. Molecular Genetics II

(April 7, 2010) Robert Sapolsky continues his series on molecular genetics in which he discusses domains of mutation and various components of natural selection on a molecular level. He also further assesses gradualism and punctuated equilibrium models of evolution, integrating these theories into an interrelated model of development.


Stanford University


Stanford Department of Biology


Stanford University Channel on YouTube

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