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10 Things About the Universe That we may Never Understand

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10 Things About the Universe That we may Never Understand

An exploration of 10 aspects of the universe that we may never understand, no matter how long we study science.

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10 Things You Never Knew About The Earth

The third rock from the sun, our home, planet Earth is full of mysteries.

From the secret ocean flowing beneath the Earth's crust, to the science of how life on Earth began, AllTime10s brings you, the 10 things you didn't know about Earth.

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10 Ways We May Have Already Detected Alien Life

An exploration into ten potential ways that we may have already detected alien life in the universe.

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10 Mind-Blowing Things You Didn't Know About The Universe

Top 10 Amazing facts about the universe

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The universe is full of infinite wonders, strange sights, and unexplained mysteries. Whether or not they understand the science behind it, humankind has always looked to the shifting constellations and falling stars for guidance, searching for a deeper purpose in the natural order of the heavens. As NASA explores the unknown and new technologies take us to uncharted territory, the wide expanse of space promises exciting discoveries.

Stars live and die and live again as nebulae or white dwarfs or pulsars. Black holes suck all the light in their vicinities and yet we’ve never actually photographed one head on. Inexplicable combinations of elements create beautiful possibilities in deep space while chemicals that could easily be found in your medicine closet float inconsequentially through the cosmos.

While there’s still much to learn about Earth as it hurtles through the vacuum, we here at the Hub have managed to curate 10 mind blowing facts about the big ole universe you probably didn’t know. If you don’t have a telescope at your disposal, gaze through your web browser to take in the interstellar bodies and cosmic anomalies that are reinforcing and, often, defying our perceptions of time and space.
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10 SETI Messages That We May Not Want to Receive

An exploration of alternative SETI messages that may not say hello.



Papers:


Searching for Interstellar Communications Cocconi and Morrison, 1959



Intelligent life in the Universe By Carl Sagan and Iosef Shklovski, 1962

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What we know for certain about the universe—and what we don't | Michelle Thaller

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If we ever discover the true size of the universe—is it infinite or just too big to measure?—we'll likely have galaxies to thank. The trillions of massive star clusters we've observed are sending light from the early universe back to us. But our measuring instruments—the strongest of which is NASA's Hubble Space Telescope—aren't powerful enough to detect light from furthest points of the universe. But in 2020, the James Webb Telescope should be able to, revealing a truer number of galaxies and perhaps the boundaries of the universe itself.

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Michelle Thaller: Evie, you ask a wonderful question: how many galaxies are there?

And this is something that we actually don’t know the answer to, but I can tell you a wonderful story about what we do know.

So let me first talk about what a galaxy is. And a galaxy is a family of stars, but usually in the hundreds of billions of stars. We live in a galaxy called the Milky Way and there are about 500 billion stars, we think, in the Milky Way Galaxy. Galaxies are absolutely huge.

The Milky Way Galaxy is about 100,000 light-years across, and that’s not really a number I can get my mind around, seeing as one light-year is about six trillion miles, so our single galaxy is 100,000-times-six-trillion miles across. It’s absolutely huge.

The best analogy I know is that if you think about the sun—the sun is a giant thing, the sun is so big you can fit a million Earths inside it. It’s really, really big. And if we made the sun the size of a dot of an “i”, so pretend that the sun is only the size of—like take a regular page of a book, look at the dot of an “i”, if the sun were that big, how big would our one Milky Way Galaxy be? It would be about the size of the earth. So that’s how big a single galaxy is.

If the sun were the dot of an “i”, the Milky Way galaxy would be roughly the size of our planet.

Now how many galaxies do we know of?

And this is a wonderful result from the Hubble Space Telescope. The Hubble Space Telescope decided to try to answer that question, and what it did is it looked at an area of the sky that, as far as we knew, was blank, it was just black; we couldn’t see many stars there, we didn’t see any galaxies there, and it decided to take a very, very deep distant look at the universe.

Now, the way the Hubble Space Telescope (and any camera) works is it works kind of like a “light bucket.” You can actually open up the eyes of the telescope and tell it to just keep staring, and the longer it stares the fainter and more distant objects you can see.

For those of you that like photography, it’s called doing a time exposure. You leave your camera open for a certain amount of time and you can see fainter and fainter things.

Well, incredibly, the Hubble Space Telescope kept its eyes open on this one little part in the sky for more than a month, and it just let any light come and build up this beautiful image, and what we discovered is that in this empty part of the sky—empty we say!—we counted over 5000 galaxies. Five thousand galaxies we didn’t even know were there. They were just so faint we’d never seen them before.

When we finally had a sensitive enough telescope up in space and we were able to keep it staring at a tiny little part of the sky for a month 5000 galaxies turned out to be hiding there that we’d never seen.

So, how much of the sky was this tiny little part that the Hubble Space Telescope looked at?

So let’s go back to the dot of an “i”. So think about the dot of an “i” in a book, and now hold of that book at arm’s length. It’s a tiny little point, you can almost barely see the dot of an “i” held at arm’s length. That’s how much of the sky the Hubble Space Telescope counted 5000 galaxies in.

And if you do the statistics, if you take that little dot in the sky, and by the way we’ve done this, we’ve taken other deep images in different regions of the sky, and we get about the same count of galaxies anywhere we look.

If you do the math, tiny little dot all over the sky, 5000 galaxies in each dot, there are actually several trillion galaxies that we can see with the Hubble Space Telescope if we had the time to observe the entire sky.

So we know that there are several trillion galaxies that the Hubble Space Telescope can see, but is that really the number? Is that how many galaxies there really are?

The universe we think is far larger than we’re able to see right now.
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10 Scary Yet Beautiful Facts About Space & Us

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FOOTAGE SOURCES:

Star Patterns ►

HD Earth Spinning ►

Planet/Universe Size Comparisons ►

Rogue Planet Collisions ►

How Dinosaurs Went Extinct ►

Sounds of Planets ►

Betelgeuse Explosion ►

Big Bang Theory Documentary ►

Killer Asteroids Documentary ►

Do We Live In A Multiverse ►

Black Hole Documentary ►

GoPro Filming In Stratosphere ►

Space Debris Animation ►

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All content used in the making of this video belong to their content creators respectively. Anything else used within the presentation were works that reside within the public domain category - content in which exclusive intellectual property rights have expired, have been forfeited, or are inapplicable.

The Universe As We Know It Shouldn't Exist | The Matter-Antimatter Problem

The universe is a pretty grand place to live, but scientists have one issue with it, it's an anomaly that should be scientifically impossible.

Hosted by: Hank Green

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How Far Can We Go? Limits of Humanity.

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Is there a border we will never cross? Are there places we will never be able to reach, no matter what? It turns out there are. Far, far more than you might have thought…

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How Far Can We Go? Limits of Humanity.

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The True Size Of The Universe As We Know It

Every time you get upset about something small, just remember this.

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Pleiades (Seven Sisters) in the Taurus Constellation
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Pleiades Star Cluster
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Milky Way Bar
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Andromeda Galaxy
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Blue Moon
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ISS006-E-40544 / NASA.gov


Moon / NASA.gov


Neptune / NASA.gov


Uranus / NASA.gov


Saturn / NASA.gov


Jupiter / NASA.gov


Mars / NASA.gov


Venus / NASA.gov


Mercury Globe / NASA.gov


Mercury as Never Seen Before / NASA.gov


THE BLUE MARBLE / NASA.gov


North America satellite orthographic / Wikimedia Commons


Earthrise / NASA.gov


TWINKLE, TWINKLE LITTLE EARTH / NASA.gov


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7 Things We Don't Know About the Ocean

The ocean covers 70% of the planet, but humans still don’t know very much about it. In this episode, Hank discusses seven mysterious ocean topics.

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Three ways the universe could end - Venus Keus

Our universe started with the Big Bang, but how will it end? Explore cosmologists’ three possible scenarios: the Big Crunch, the Big Freeze and the Big Rip.

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We know about our universe’s past: the Big Bang theory predicts that all matter, time and space began about 14 billion years ago. And we know about the present: scientists’ observations of galaxies tell us that the universe is expanding at an accelerated rate. But what about the future? Do we know how our universe is going to end? Venus Keus explores cosmologists’ three possible scenarios.

Lesson by Venus Keus, directed by Antimatter Studio.

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10 Unsettling Solutions to the Fermi Paradox

An exploration of ten of the most unsettling solutions to the Fermi Paradox, or the question of are we alone and if not, where are they?



Papers:

The Sustainability Solution to the Fermi Paradox, Haqq-Misra and Baum, 2009



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Why Physics Can't Totally Explain the Universe's Expansion | SciShow News

Astronomers have gotten pretty good at calculating how fast the universe is expanding, but new measurements don’t line up with the predictions of well-tested laws of physics. Now scientists have a new question to ponder: Why are these numbers so different?

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Why we might be alone in the Universe

There are trillions upon trillions of stars and worlds in our Universe. Faced with such large numbers, it's tempting to conclude that there must surely be other life out there, somewhere. But is this right? Could the probability of life beginning be a number so small that we are alone? A video essay by Professor David Kipping.

Further reading and resources:
► Chen, Jingjing & Kipping, David (2018), On the Rate of Abiogenesis from a Bayesian Informatics Perspective, Astrobiology, 18, 12:
► Hanson, Robin (1998), Must Early Life Be Easy? The Rhythm of Major Evolutionary Transitions:
► Benzene in space materials and story:
► Columbia University Department of Astronomy:
► Cool Worlds Lab website:

Music is largely by Chris Zabriskie ( and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license ( in order of appearance;
► The Sun is Scheduled to Come Out Tomorrow (
► Music from Neptune Flux, We Were Never Meant to Live Here (
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► Music from Neptune Flux, Stories About the World That Once Was (
► Waking Up by Atlas, licensed through SoundStripe.com:
► Cylinder Two (
► Piano cover of S.T.A.Y. (Hans Zimmer) byt Jordie Eskes:

Video materials used:

► Intro/outro video by Miguel Aragon of Johns Hopkins University with Mark Subbarao of the Adler Planetarium and Alex Szalay of Johns Hopkins using Sloan Digitial Sky Survey data:
► Bacteria videos from Nikon Small World competition: and
► Tour of the J. Craig Venter Institute by Hedrich Blessing Motion and Sound:
► Tardigrade footage:
► Yellowstone park footage:
► Bill Nye interview with Rita Braver aired on CBS Sunday Morning July 10 2016:
► Neil deGrasse Tyson interview with Charlie Rose aired on PBS May 26 2015:
► Carl Sagan interview with Charlie Rose aired on PBS May 27 1996:
► Brian Cox interview on This Morning, ITV aired December 2 2014:
► Milky Way animation by Stefan Payne-Wardenaar:

Films clips used:
► Star Trek: The Next Generation
► Them! (1953)

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Why We Might Be Alone in the Universe

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Why does it appear, that humanity is the lone intelligence in the universe? The answer might be that planet Earth is more unique than we've previously assumed. The rare earth hypothesis posits exactly this - that a range of factors made Earth exceptionally unusual and uniquely able to produce intelligent life.

In upcoming episodes we’ll be exploring the anthropic principle and its two main versions - the strong and the weak anthropic principles. The strong anthropic principle tells us that the observed universe must be able to produce observers - including the contentious idea that this predicts the existence of universes beyond our own. But in today's episode we’re going to focus on the weak anthropic principle. It says that we must find ourselves in a part of the universe capable of supporting us. For example, in a planetary biosphere rather than floating in the void between the galaxies. This may seems tautological, but accounting for this observer selection bias is important to understanding why the universe looks the way it does from our perspective. And the weak anthropic principle is much more useful than that. When combined with the apparent absence of alien civilizations, it may tell us why intelligent life is incredibly rare in our universe.

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10 Ways SETI Might Detect Alien Civilizations And What They Might Be Like

An exploration of 10 Ways SETI Might Detect Alien Civilizations and further speculation of what they might be like, and what we might infer about them.

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10 Reasons Aliens Won't Invade Earth

An exploration into the concept of alien invasion and reasons why aliens would not attempt to invade earth.



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10 Unsettling Ways Humans Could Go Extinct

An exploration of ten ways humans could go extinct other than the usual concepts of nuclear war, anthropogenic climate change, and asteroid impacts.

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ANNA voiced by the wonderful Eryn Knight:



Papers:

Discovery of a Meteor of Interstellar Origin, Siraj and Loeb, 2019.



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10 Unusual Aspects of Planet Jupiter

An exploration of ten of the most unusual aspects of the planet Jupiter.

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