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13. The Origins of World War I

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13. The Origins of World War I

France Since 1871 (HIST 276)

The traditional, diplomatic history of World War I is helpful in understanding how a series of hitherto improbable alliances come to be formed in the early years of the twentieth century. In the case of France and Russia, this involves a significant ideological compromise. Along with the history of imperial machinations, however, World War I should be understood in the context of the popular imagination and the growth of nationalist sentiment in Europe.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Tangled Maps of Empire: Diplomatic Origins of the First World War
07:24 - Chapter 2. A Delicate Balances: The Shifting Alliances of the Great Powers
19:26 - Chapter 3. The British Empire on the World Stage: Capabilities on the Continent
32:29 - Chapter 4. Mounting Tensions in Alsace-Lorraine: The Saverne Crisis
40:14 - Chapter 5. War Expectations and Enthusiasm

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

The Beginnings Of World War 1 Explained | First World War EP1 | Timeline

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The complex origins of the Great War, and how seemingly insignificant local tensions in the Balkans exploded into World War.

Content licensed from DRG. Any queries, please contact us at: realstories@littledotstudios.com
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New Thinking on the Origins of World War I

This summer marks the centennial of the outbreak of World War I, perhaps the most transformative war in history. While the wars of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic wars harnessed national populations to the war effort in a way not previously seen since the emergence of the modern states system, WWI combined the mobilization of both populations and industrial power, enhanced by technology, to produce a most lethal form of warfare. WWI also redrew the map of Europe and created the modern Middle East, as it led to the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Russian Empire, and the Ottoman Empire, thereby unleashing nationalism the disruptive characteristics of which still plague us today. It also paved the way for the great ideological conflicts of the 20th century by unleashing the forces of state-based communism and fascism. To commemorate the outbreak of The Great War, FPRI and ROA will present a workshop offering presentations by three eminent scholars of the war. Michael Neiberg of the US Army War College will discuss the factors that led to the outbreak of the war. John Schindler of the US Naval War College will discuss the often overlooked role of Austria-Hungary in the war and the Eastern and Italian fronts. Kate Epstein of Rutgers University-Camden will discuss the role of pre-war British defense policy in the outbreak of the conflict. Mac Owens, editor of Orbis and professor at the Naval War College, will moderate the panel.

HOW World War I Started: Crash Course World History 209

In which John Green teaches you about World War I and how it got started. Crash Course doesn't usually talk much about dates, but the way that things unfolded in July and August of 1914 are kind of important to understanding the Great War. You'll learn about Franz Ferdinand, Gavrilo Pincep, the Black Hand, and why the Serbian nationalists wanted to kill the poor Archduke. You'll also learn who mobilized first and who exactly started the war. Sort of. Actually there's no good answer to who started the war, but we give it a shot anyway.

You can directly support Crash Course at Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content.
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A War To End All Wars - Home Front Propaganda I THE GREAT WAR - Week 13

The first weeks of war already took hundreds of thousands of lives and the daily struggle to survive in the trenches on the Western Front has nothing to do with the promised glory. Back home, propaganda is already working and grotesquely distorting the public's opinion about the war. While the British civilians feared a German invasion, some of the leading German scientists and intellectuals published the Manifesto Of The 93 in which they rallied for solidarity with the Germans. You can read the whole manifesto right here:

If you have questions about our show or about the team behind THE GREAT WAR, you should check out our new format OUT OF THE TRENCHES where Indy answers your questions:

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You can support us by sharing our videos with your friends and spreading the word about our work.You can also support us financially on Patreon:

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» MORE HISTORY?
Check out our sister channel IT’S HISTORY:

» WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION ABOUT WORLD WAR I AND WHERE ELSE CAN I FIND YOU?
We’re offering background knowledge, news, a glimpse behind the scenes and much more on:
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» CAN I EMBED YOUR VIDEOS ON MY WEBSITE?
Of course, you can embed our videos on your website. We are happy if you show our channel to your friends, fellow students, classmates, professors, teachers or neighbours. Or just share our videos on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit etc.

We are also happy to get your feedback, criticism or ideas in the comments. If you have interesting historical questions, just post them and we will answer in our OUT OF THE TRENCHES videos. You can find a selection of answers to the most frequently asked questions here:

» CAN I SHOW YOUR VIDEOS IN CLASS?
Of course! Tell your teachers or professors about our channel and our videos. We’re happy if we can contribute with our videos. If you are a teacher and have questions about our show, you can get in contact with us on one of our social media presences.

» WHAT ARE YOUR SOURCES?
Videos: British Pathé
Pictures: Mostly Picture Alliance
Background Map:
Literature (excerpt):
Gilbert, Martin. The First World War. A Complete History, Holt Paperbacks, 2004.
Hart, Peter. The Great War. A Combat History of the First World War, Oxford University Press, 2013.
Hart, Peter. The Great War. 1914-1918, Profile Books, 2013.
Stone, Norman. World War One. A Short History, Penguin, 2008.
Keegan, John. The First World War, Vintage, 2000.
Hastings, Max. Catastrophe 1914. Europe Goes To War, Knopf, 2013.
Hirschfeld, Gerhard. Enzyklopädie Erster Weltkrieg, Schöningh Paderborn, 2004
Michalka, Wolfgang. Der Erste Weltkrieg. Wirkung, Wahrnehmung, Analyse, Seehamer Verlag GmbH, 2000
Leonhard, Jörn. Die Büchse der Pandora: Geschichte des Ersten Weltkrieges, C.H. Beck, 2014

If you want to buy some of the books we use or recommend during our show, check out our Amazon Store:
NOTE: This store uses affiliate links which grant us a commission if you buy a product there.

» WHAT IS “THE GREAT WAR” PROJECT?
THE GREAT WAR covers the events exactly 100 years ago: The story of World War I in realtime. Featuring: The unique archive material of British Pathé. Indy Neidell takes you on a journey into the past to show you what really happened and how it all could spiral into more than four years of dire war. Subscribe to our channel and don’t miss our new episodes every Thursday.

» WHO IS REPLYING TO MY COMMENTS? AND WHO IS BEHIND THIS PROJECT?
Most of the comments are written by our social media manager Florian. He is posting links, facts and backstage material on our social media channels. But from time to time, Indy reads and answers comments with his personal account, too.

The Team responsible for THE GREAT WAR is even bigger:

- CREDITS -
Presented by : Indiana Neidell
Written by: Indiana Neidell
Director: David Voss
Director of Photography: Toni Steller
Sound: Toni Steller
Sound Design: Marc Glücks
Editing: Toni Steller & Ole-Sten Haufe
Research by: Indiana Neidell
Fact checking: Latoya Wild, Johanna Müssiger, Florian Wittig, David Voss

A Mediakraft Networks Original Channel
Based on a concept by Spartacus Olsson
Author: Indiana Neidell
Visual Concept: Astrid Deinhard-Olsson
Executive Producer: Astrid Deinhard-Olsson and Spartacus Olsson
Head of Production: Carolin Hengholt
Producer: David Voss
Social Media Manager: Florian Wittig

Contains licenced Material by British Pathé
All rights reserved - © Mediakraft Networks GmbH, 2014

WORLD WAR I - A Kid Explains History, Episode 17

Mr. Q returns to the subject of World Wars to take a look at what caused the first one (you can see what he learned about WWII in episode 1). Who is Franz Ferdinand and why was this war worse that all the others that came before it? Find out here.
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Archdukes, Cynicism, and World War I: Crash Course World History #36

In which John Green teaches you about the war that was supposed to end all wars. Instead, it solved nothing and set the stage for the world to be back at war just a couple of decades later. As an added bonus, World War I changed the way people look at the world, and normalized cynicism and irony. John will teach you how the assassination of an Austrian Archduke kicked off a new kind of war that involved more nations and more people than any war that came before. New technology like machine guns, airplanes, tanks, and poison gas made the killing more efficient than ever. Trench warfare and modern weapons led to battles in which tens of thousands of soldiers were killed in a day, with no ground gained for either side. World War I washed away the last vestiges of 19th century Romanticism and paved the way for the 20th century modernism that we all know and find to be cold and off-putting. While there may not be much upside to WWI, at least it inspired George M. Cohan to write the awesome song, Over There.

Crash Course World History is now available on DVD!

Resources:

Over There by George M. Cohan performed by Bill Murray:

The Guns of August by Barbara Tuchman:

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2015 Ross Horning Lecture "Was World War One Inevitable?"

Margaret MacMillan was this year's keynote speaker for the Creighton University Department of History Ross Horning Lecture.
Margaret MacMillan is the Warden of St Antony’s College and a Professor of International History at the University of Oxford.
Her books include Women of the Raj; Paris 1919: Six Months that Changed the World, among others. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a Senior Fellow of Massey College, University of Toronto, Honorary Fellow of Trinity College, University of Toronto and of St Hilda’s College, University of Oxford, and sits on the boards of the Mosaic Institute and the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, and the editorial boards of International History and First World War Studies.
In 2006 Professor MacMillan was invested as an Officer of the Order of Canada.

Great War – World War One – Sabaton History 019 [Official]

The title track of the upcoming Sabaton Album 'The Great War' is about the conflict in general. The horrors, modern techniques and tactics and the differences with other conflicts.

Support Sabaton History on Patreon (and possibly get a History Channel special edition):

Pre-order The Great War here:

Check out the trailer for Sabaton’s new album ‘The Great War’ right here:

Watch more videos on the Sabaton YouTube channel:
Listen to Sabaton on Spotify:
Official Sabaton Merchandise Shop:

Check out Indy Neidells channels:
World War Two:
TimeGhost History:

Hosted by: Indy Neidell
Written by: Markus Linke and Indy Neidell
Directed by: Astrid Deinhard and Wieke Kapteijns
Produced by: Pär Sundström, Astrid Deinhard and Spartacus Olsson
Creative Producer: Joram Appel
Executive Producers: Pär Sundström, Joakim Broden, Tomas Sunmo, Indy Neidell, Astrid Deinhard, and Spartacus Olsson
Maps by: Eastory
Edited by: Iryna Dulka
Sound Editing by: Marek Kaminski

Eastory YouTube Channel:
Archive by: Reuters/Screenocean
Music by Sabaton.

Sources:
- IWM: Q 57096, Q 24285, IWM 1053, Art.IWM ART 1921, Art.IWM ART 4028, Art.IWM ART 876, Art.IWM ART 2660, IWM 1062-02a, Q 23760, IWM 59, IWM 1043a, Q 2891, Q 5733, Q 2902, CO 2246, Q 2712, Q 5937, Q 2735, Q 5714, Q 3117, Q 3002
- National Library of Scotland
-Colorization: Klimbim

An OnLion Entertainment GmbH and Raging Beaver Publishing AB co-Production.

© Raging Beaver Publishing AB, 2019 - all rights reserved.

America in World War I: Crash Course US History #30

You can directly support Crash Course at Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content.

In which John Green teaches you about American involvement in World War I, which at the time was called the Great War. They didn't know there was going to be a second one, though they probably should have guessed, 'cause this one didn't wrap up very neatly. So, the United States stayed out of World War I at first, because Americans were in an isolationist mood in the early 20th century. That didn't last though, as the affronts piled up and drew the US into the war. Spoiler alert: the Lusitania was sunk two years before we joined the war, so that wasn't the sole cause for our jumping in. It was part of it though, as was the Zimmerman telegram, unrestricted submarine warfare, and our affinity for the Brits. You'll learn the war's effects on the home front, some of Woodrow Wilson's XIV Points, and just how the war ended up expanding the power of the government in Americans' lives.

Subbable message!!!: Jared Richardson says, All true love is beautiful. Support your LGBT community.

Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. The complex secret alliances of Europe led to World War I:
It took several years before Americans joined the war:
After the war, President Woodrow Wilson wanted to prevent a future World War, and promoted creating a League of Nations, established following the Treaty of Versailles:

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Ten Minute English and British History #13 - The First Scottish War of Independence.

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This episode covers the wake of Alexander III's death and Scotland's search for an heir. This led to Edward I of England's intervention and after his dominance was rejected by the Scottish, Edward sought to conquer instead. William Wallace and later King Robert the Bruce were the leaders of the Scottish resistance which eventually saw England defeated and Scotland remain independent.

Recommended books:

A. Barrell, Medieval Scotland (2000). A great overview of the period but its scope is much broader than this episode.

G. Barrow, Kingship and Unity: Scotland, 1100-1306 (2003). Much greater focus than the above.

M. Morris, A Great and Terrible King: Edward I and the forging of Britain (2008). For an overview of England and its aims during the Scottish Wars of Independence.

Ten Minute English and British History is a series of short, ten minute animated narrative documentaries that are designed as revision refreshers or simple introductions to a topic. Please note that these are not meant to be comprehensive and there's a lot of stuff I couldn't fit into the episodes that I would have liked to. Thank you for watching, though, it's always appreciated.

World War 1 VS World War 2 - How Do They Compare?

HOW DO THE TWO WARS COMPARE?

People have been fighting wars since the first wooden spears were carved thousands of years ago. Estimates for the total number killed in war throughout all of human history ranges from 150 million to 1 billion people, and according to the New York Times, at least 108 million have been killed in wars in the twentieth century alone. With the continuing advances we see in technology, the way we fight wars is constantly changing. Today we’ll be looking at how two of the biggest wars in history compare, in this episode of The Infographics Show: World War 1 vs World War 2.


World War 1 vs World War 2. How do the two wars compare?

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Some Images used under license from Shutterstock.com
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History of Movie Stars and World War I

The History Guy remembers movie stars, the Great War and the forgotten history of the London Scottish Regiment.

The History Guy uses images that are in the Public Domain. As photographs of actual events are often not available, I will sometimes use photographs of similar events or objects for illustration.

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The History Guy: Five Minutes of History is the place to find short snippets of forgotten history from five to fifteen minutes long. If you like history too, this is the channel for you.

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The episode is intended for educational purposes. All events are presented in historical context.

#history #thehistoryguy #worldwari

Germany's Attack On The Western Front | First World War EP9 | Timeline

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In March 1918, Germany launched a massive offensive on the Western Front - her bid to win the war before the Americans arrived. The master was General Erich Ludendorff - a genius, but unstable. Within days the British Fifth Army was in retreat, Paris was under shell-fire and some Allies feared defeat. But Germany's allies, Ottoman Turkey and Austria-Hungary, were starving and demoralised and the war-weary German Home Front was infected with dangerous socialist ideas. Then Ludendorff's great offensive ran out of steam, having stormed ahead without strategic aims or supplies. German soldiers slowed, exhausted and hungry. And then the Americans started pouring in.

Content licensed from DRG. Any queries, please contact us at: realstories@littledotstudios.com

Epic History: World War One - 1914

Everything you need to know about the first year of World War One in a 12 minute video.
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Recommended books on 1914 & WW1 (use affiliate link to buy on Amazon & support the channel):
Margaret MacMillan, The War that Ended Peace
Max Hastings, Catastrophe: Europe Goes to War 1914
Christopher Clark, The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914
Lyn MacDonald, 1914 : The Days of Hope
Peter Hart, The Great War: 1914-1918
A J P Taylor, The First World War: An Illustrated History
Hew Strachan, The First World War: A New History

'World War One - 1914' is the first in a five-part series covering the Great War. This episode covers the rival alliances that dominated Europe in the build-up to war, the Triple Alliance and the Triple Entente, and the fatal gunshots by Gavrilo Princip at Sarajevo that resulted in the death of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Imperial rivalries, the system of alliances and deep-seated animosities helped propel Europe into a general war. However Woodrow Wilson, the US President, ensured America stood apart from Europe's conflict. In August 1914, Germany invaded France and Belgium as part of the Schlieffen Plan. The tiny British Expeditionary Force could only hold up the German army for a few hours at the Battle of Mons, but later joined the French in saving Paris at the Battle of the Marne. The 'Race to the Sea' followed, leading to the First Battle of Ypres, as both sides tried to outflank each other to the north. Their failure led to a stalemate, in which the devastating power of machineguns and artillery forced infantry of both sides to take cover in deep trenches.

At sea, Britain's Royal Navy won the war's first naval battle at Heligoland Bight, and imposed a naval blockade on Germany, preventing war supplies (including, controversially, food) from reaching the country by sea. HMS Pathfinder was soon sunk by a German U-boat, revealing the potential of Germany's submarines to overturn Britain's long-held naval dominance.

On the Eastern Front, a Russian invasion of East Prussia ended in disaster at the Battle of Tannenberg, masterminded by German generals Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff. A second victory at the Battle of Masurian Lakes sent the Russian army into retreat. Austria-Hungary's invasion of Serbia began badly, with defeat at the Battle of Cer. Things went even worse on the Russian front, as Austria's offensive against the Russians leads to heavy losses, and forced Germany to come to the rescue, by launching the Battle of Łódź.

In Africa, British, French and German colonial forces clashed in British East Africa (Kenya), Togoland (Togo), German South-West Africa (Namibia), and German Kamerun (Cameroon). German Colonel Paul von Lettow-Vorbek had notable success repelling the British at the Battle of Tanga.

In the Pacific, Japan honoured its alliance with Britain and seized the German naval base at Tsingtao in China. Task forces from Australia and New Zealand secured the German colonies of Samoa and New Guinea. German Admiral von Spee's East Asia Squadron won victory at the Battle of Coronel, off Chile, before sailing into catastrophe at the Battle of the Falkland Islands. In the Middle East, British troops occupied Basra, securing access to Persian oil for their fleet.

Winter 1914 saw the French launch their first major offensive to break the trench stalemate of the Western Front. But the First Battle of Champagne led to heavy losses for no real gains. Ottoman operations in the Caucasus Mountains also ended in disaster at the Battle of Sarikamish. The war's first Christmas was marked by games of football in No Man's Land on the Western Front, but early hopes of a short war had now been entirely quashed.

CORRECTION: 7.55 - the map shows Cyprus as part of the Ottoman Empire. Cyprus was part of the Ottoman Empire from 1570 to 1914, but when the Ottoman Empire joined the Central Powers in November 1914, Cyprus was annexed by Britain.

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#EpicHistoryTV #WorldWarOne #WW1
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The history of the Cuban Missile Crisis - Matthew A. Jordan

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Imagine going about your life knowing that, at any given moment, you and everyone you know could be wiped out without warning at the push of a button. This was the reality for millions of people during the forty-five year period after World War II now known as the Cold War. Matthew A. Jordan explains the history behind the peak of all this panic — the thirteen days of the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Lesson by Mathew A. Jordan, animation by Patrick Smith.

Six-Day War (1967) - Third Arab–Israeli War DOCUMENTARY

We are continuing our series of animated historical videos on the modern wars with the Six-Day War of 1967, also known as the Third Arab–Israeli War during which Israel fought the alliance of Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Iraq. This conflict entered history as short, but decisive, as it took less than a week for hostilities to start and end, and was mostly decided in the air.
Previously we have covered the battles of Stalingrad ( and Kursk ( within the II World War.

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This video was narrated by Officially Devin (

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World War II: Crash Course World History #38

Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! Visit to buy a set for your home or classroom.

In which John Green teaches you about World War II, aka The Great Patriotic War, aka The Big One. So how did this war happen? And what does it mean? We've all learned the facts about World War II many times over, thanks to repeated classroom coverage, the History channel, and your grandfather (or maybe great-grandfather) showing you that Nazi bayonet he used to keep in his sock drawer and telling you a bunch of age-inappropriate stories about his harrowing war experiences. So, why did the Axis powers think forceful expansion was a good idea? (they were hungry). So why did this thing shake out in favor of the Allies? HInt: it has to do with the fact that it was a world war. Germany and Japan made some pretty serious strategic errors, such as invading Russia and attacking the United States, and those errors meant that pretty much the whole world was against them. So, find out how this worldwide alliance came together to stop the Axis expansion. All this, plus Canada finally gets the respectful treatment it deserves. Oh, and a warning: there are a few graphic images in this episode. Sensitive viewers may want to use caution, especially around the 9:15 mark.

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Egyptian Gods Explained In 13 Minutes

Egyptian Mythology has the most interesting Gods of the ancient world, including Ra, Amun, Osiris, Isis, Horus, Seth, Anubis, Thoth, Ptah, Sekhmet, Bastet, Hathor and Neith. Try two months of Skillshare for free: | Starting with the creation of the world, we will witness the birth of the Gods and their epic power struggle to become the Pharaoh of Egypt.

At the beginning of time, there was only Nu, the primeval waters of chaos. Then, in a great flood, the sun god Atum rose from the water and willed himself into creation. Atum then created Air, a son he named Shu, and moisture, a daughter he named Tefnut. They were the first divine pair and soon had children of their own, the Earth named Geb, and the Sky called Nut. This second divine pair then had four children of their own, Osiris, Isis, Seth and Nephthys, completing the group of nine primeval gods known as the Ennead, consisting of Atum and his eight descendants.

Egyptian Mythology Explained In 13 Minutes

Timestamps:

Creation of the World 0:16
The Battle for Kingship 0:51
Amun 2:07
Osiris 3:03
Isis 4:21
Horus 5:05
Seth 5:39
Ra 6:42
'Eyes' of Ra 8:03
Sekhmet 8:25
Bastet 8:51
Hathor 9:14
Neith 9:48
Ptah 10:22
Anubis 10:55
Thoth 11:54

The Information in this video came from The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt by Richard H. Wilkinson



Music:

Intro and Outro Music by:


Video music by:
Derek and Brandon Fiechter




Artlist


Other Videos:

Norse Mythology Explained In 15 Minutes


Greek Gods Explained In 12 Minutes


World War 2 Explained | Best WW2 Documentary | Part 1


The Fall of Rome Explained In 13 Minutes


Left vs Right: Political Spectrum - Explained In 4 Minutes

Sun Tzu - The Art of War Explained In 5 Minutes


Genghis Khan and The Mongol Empire Explained In 8 Minutes:

Fall of The Soviet Union Explained In 5 Minutes



The Life Guide is a channel dedicated to providing interesting and educational content about a range of political, philosophical, economic and historical topics. Whether you are interested in a simplified explanation of complicated modern ideas or detailed information on ancient civilizations and philosophical schools of thought, The Life Guide is the channel for you.

#EgyptianGods #EgyptianMythology #GodsOfEgypt

Prof. Robert Weiner: The Origins of World War II

Robert Weiner, Jones Professor of History, lectures on The Origins of World War II as part of Lafayette College's Alumni Summer College. See alumnicollege.lafayette.edu for details.

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