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3 Books To Widen Your View of U.S. History

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Books on Race and Culture | BHM Vlog #23

It's Black History Month!!

I will be vlogging on all things BLACK from Black artists, authors, content creators, and black businesses!

Today I am sharing my book wish list for 2018! These are all related to race amd culture in the US.

1. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration
In the Age of Colorblindness by : Michelle Alexander

2. Why are all the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations About Race
By: Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum

3. Between the World and Me By: Ta-Nahesi Coates

4. Citizen: An American Lyric By: Claudia Rankine

5. They Can't Kill Us All: Ferguson, Baltimore, and a New Era in America's Racial Justice Movement
By: Wesely Lowery

Please let me know if there is a topic you want me to cover this month and i will include it in my schedule.

28 days of ALL BLACK EVERYTHING!

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The Market Revolution: Crash Course US History #12

In which John Green teaches you about the Market Revolution. In the first half of the 19th century, the way people lived and worked in the United States changed drastically. At play was the classic (if anything in a 30 year old nation can be called classic) American struggle between the Jeffersonian ideal of individuals sustaining themselves on small farms vs. the Hamiltonian vision of an economy based on manufacturing and trade. I'll give you one guess who won. Too late! It was Hamilton, which is why if you live in the United States, you probably live in a city, and are unlikely to be a farmer. Please resist the urge to comment about this if you live in the country and/or are a farmer. Your anecdotal experience doesn't change the fact that most people live in cities. In the early 19th century, new technologies in transportation and communication helped remake the economic system of the country. Railroads and telegraphs changed the way people moved goods and information around. The long and short of it is, the Market Revolution meant that people now went somewhere to work rather than working at home. Often, that somewhere was a factory where they worked for an hourly wage rather than getting paid for the volume of goods they manufactured. This shift in the way people work has repercussions in our daily lives right down to today. Watch as John teaches you how the Market Revolution sowed the seeds of change in the way Americans thought about the roles of women, slavery, and labor rights. Also, check out high school John wearing his Academic Decathalon medals. Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. As America invested in its market economy, certain transcendentalists resisted the rise of production and consumerism over individual freedoms, including Henry David Thoreau in his book Walden:
Ralph Waldo Emerson promoted transcendental values as well in his essay “Self-Reliance”:
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Women's Suffrage: Crash Course US History #31

You can directly support Crash Course at Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content.

In which John Green teaches you about American women in the Progressive Era and, well, the progress they made. So the big deal is, of course, the right to vote women gained when the 19th amendment was passed and ratified. But women made a lot of other gains in the 30 years between 1890 and 1920. More women joined the workforce, they acquired lots of other legal rights related to property, and they also became key consumers in the industrial economy. Women also continued to play a vital role in reform movements. Sadly, they got Prohibition enacted in the US, but they did a lot of good stuff, too. The field of social work emerged as women like Jane Addams created settlement houses to assist immigrants in their integration into the United States. Women also began to work to make birth control widely available. You'll learn about famous reformers and activists like Alice Paul, Margaret Sanger, and Emma Goldman, among others.

Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Suffragists faced a decades-long debate on women’s right to vote:
While it was a hard fight to get the vote, women eventually received suffrage in 1920:

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What Makes Christianity Different from Other Religions? | Illuminate Ep 3

Is Christianity the same as other religions? Not quite.

Find out what makes Christianity unique in this insightful video.

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1929 Vs Now: Are We Headed For The Greatest Depression? Mike Maloney

Download Mike's best-selling book for free here: “What’s coming will be the weirdest, most twisted thing you’ve ever seen, something that will be very hard to predict—so the more educated you are on history the better chance you have at surviving it.”
This sobering quote from Mike Maloney highlights why he devotes his new video to the Great Depression… because it can offer valuable insights into what could be ahead for us today.
When Mike wrote his bestselling book Guide to Investing in Gold & Silver, he studied many sources about the Great Depression, but he relied mostly on three books to get a broad view of what happened. Mike will share those books with you… but as he says, he ended up doing so much research that two-thirds of what he’d written about the Great Depression had to be cut!
Sit back and enjoy Mike reading some excerpts of what was cut from his book, along with some photos and other quotes from that painful era. Listen to how they sound oh-so-familiar to what is happening today.
The future may be unknown, but the more you study history the more you can be prepared for whatever may come. Tune in to watch Mike talk about the lessons he learned from studying one of the most painful economic periods in US history.
Thanks for sharing and clicking that 'Like' button. For those wondering why our videos don't appear in their subscription feed immediately - we release our clips to our free weekly email readers first, then later we publish to YouTube. Sometimes it's just hours, sometimes it's a couple of days later. This is to encourage people to join our free newsletter - because one day, we may not have YouTube to rely on. Join our free newsletter list by going to and entering your email address in the 'Get Market Alerts' box at the bottom of the page. As always, thank you for your support. M.


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Your brain hallucinates your conscious reality | Anil Seth

Right now, billions of neurons in your brain are working together to generate a conscious experience -- and not just any conscious experience, your experience of the world around you and of yourself within it. How does this happen? According to neuroscientist Anil Seth, we're all hallucinating all the time; when we agree about our hallucinations, we call it reality. Join Seth for a delightfully disorienting talk that may leave you questioning the very nature of your existence.

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The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

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5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

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Every day, a sea of decisions stretches before us, and it’s impossible to make a perfect choice every time. But there are many ways to improve our chances — and one particularly effective technique is critical thinking. Samantha Agoos describes a 5-step process that may help you with any number of problems.

Lesson by Samantha Agoos, animation by Nick Hilditch.

Slavery - Crash Course US History #13

In which John Green teaches you about America's peculiar institution, slavery. I wouldn't really call it peculiar. I'd lean more toward horrifying and depressing institution, but nobody asked me. John will talk about what life was like for a slave in the 19th century United States, and how slaves resisted oppression, to the degree that was possible. We'll hear about cotton plantations, violent punishment of slaves, day to day slave life, and slave rebellions. Nat Turner, Harriet Tubman, and Whipped Peter all make an appearance. Slavery as an institution is arguably the darkest part of America's history, and we're still dealing with its aftermath 150 years after it ended. Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Memoirs from former slaves like abolitionist Frederick Douglass provide insightful context on the harsh realities of slavery:
Others resisted the violence of slavery through open rebellion, like Nat Turner:
Abolitionists and free slaves alike had to fight against unfair laws such as the Fugitive Slave Act:

Age of Jackson: Crash Course US History #14

In which John Green teaches you about the presidency of Andrew Jackson So how did a president with astoundingly bad fiscal policies end up on the $20 bill? That's a question we can't answer, but we can tell you how Jackson got to be president, and how he changed the country when he got the job. Jackson's election was more democratic than any previous presidential election. More people were able to vote, and they picked a doozie. Jackson was a well-known war hero, and he was elected over his longtime political enemy, John Quincy Adams. Once Jackson was in office, he did more to expand executive power than any of the previous occupants of the White House. He used armed troops to collect taxes, refused to enforce legislation and supreme court legislation, and hired and fired his staff based on support in elections. He was also the first president to regularly wield the presidential veto as a political tool. Was he a good president? Watch this video and draw your own conclusions. Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. On of Andrew Jackson's most lasting and memorable policies was that of Indian removal:
Jackson’s promotion of this cause led to the infamous Trail of Tears:

Reconstruction and 1876: Crash Course US History #22

In which John Green teaches you about Reconstruction. After the divisive, destructive Civil War, Abraham Lincoln had a plan to reconcile the country and make it whole again. Then he got shot, Andrew Johnson took over, and the disagreements between Johnson and Congress ensured that Reconstruction would fail. The election of 1876 made the whole thing even more of a mess, and the country called it off, leaving the nation still very divided. John will talk about the gains made by African-Americans in the years after the Civil War, and how they lost those gains almost immediately when Reconstruction stopped. You'll learn about the Freedman's Bureau, the 14th and 15th amendments, and the disastrous election of 1876. John will explore the goals of Reconstruction, the successes and ultimate failure, and why his alma mater Kenyon College is better than Raoul's alma mater NYU. Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode.The period of Reconstruction that followed the Civil War was imperfect, and failed to create lasting change after 1876:
Following the end of the Civil War, many African Americans found themselves turning from slavery to sharecropping, an unfair system that would last until World War II and the Civil Rights Movement:
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Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?

#humans #population #humanevolution #overpopulation

Download the video in HD:



Related content:

Population Connection


UN World Population Prospects


Real-time population counter


NASA EarthData


NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center


Video credits:

Writer/Producer
AMNH/L. Moustakerski

Animator
AMNH/S. Krasinski

Sound Design
AMNH/J. Morfoot

Scientific Advisors
AMNH/S. Macey
AMNH/J. Zichello
Center for Biodiversity and Conservation

Images
PhyloPic
David Hillis, Derrick Zwickl, and Robin Gutell, University of Texas

World Population used courtesy of Population Connection, ©2015

Other Population Data Sources
Population Connection
United Nations, “World Population Prospects: 2015 Revision”
US Census Bureau

Maps and Event Sources
Encyclopedia Britannica
Inner Asian & Uralic National Resource Center
NASA
NOAA
Needham, J. Science and Civilisation in China
TimeMaps
Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database

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This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

© American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

How America became a superpower

America grew from a colony to a superpower in 200 years.

Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at

2:07 Correction: Cuba seceded from the US in 1902.

With over 800 military bases around the globe, the US is easily the most powerful nation on earth. But it wasn't always this way. The US once played an insignificant role in global affairs. In this 8-minute video, you can see the transformation.

Military budget data:

US foreign bases based on David Vine's book, Base Nation

Troop numbers: Total Military Personnel and Dependent End Strength By Service, Regional Area, and Country. Defense Manpower Data Center. November 7, 2016.

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out

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Animated map shows how religion spread around the world

Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam are five of the biggest religions in the world. Over the last few thousand years, these religious groups have shaped the course of history and had a profound influence on the trajectory of the human race. Through countless conflicts, conquests, missions abroad, and simple word of mouth, these religions spread around the globe and forever molded the huge geographic regions in their paths.

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Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

The Progressive Era: Crash Course US History #27

You can directly support Crash Course at Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps keep the channel producing great content.

In which John Green teaches you about the Progressive Era in the United States. In the late 19th and early 20th century in America, there was a sense that things could be improved upon. A sense that reforms should be enacted. A sense that progress should be made. As a result, we got the Progressive Era, which has very little to do with automobile insurance, but a little to do with automobiles. All this overlapped with the Gilded Age, and is a little confusing, but here we have it. Basically, people were trying to solve some of the social problems that came with the benefits of industrial capitalism. To oversimplify, there was a competition between the corporations' desire to keep wages low and workers' desire to have a decent life. Improving food safety, reducing child labor, and unions were all on the agenda in the Progressive Era. While progress was being made, and people were becoming more free, these gains were not equally distributed. Jim Crow laws were put in place in the south, and immigrant rights were restricted as well. So once again on Crash Course, things aren't so simple.

Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. The Progressive Era was marked by rapid reactions to the Gilded Age:
Literature such as The Jungle revealed the horrifying conditions of factory industries, one of several which were overhauled with new progressive regulations:

Great Books about Science, Atheism, Bible Falsities, and Secularism in U.S. History

Three book recommendations.
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3 Different Views on the Slavery Narrative

Rincey recommends 3 books that are not only great reads, but also provide three different angles on slavery in the United States.

Books Mentioned
Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi
The Good Lord Bird by James McBride
The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

Join us for Book Riot Live 2016! Tickets are now on sale at

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How Bill Gates reads books

Bill Gates reads about 50 books a year, which breaks down to about one a week. Gates told us the four habits and hacks he does to get the most out of his reading. Yes, knowing the habits of successful people can help you improve and Gate's tips on how to read are no exception.

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American History Books | All Grades | Homeschool

Looking for a complete history of the US? I have five American History series that would be suitable for all elementary and high school. The History of US by Joy Hakim would work for students as young as 5th grade through high school. The books are sold separately or as a set and you can also purchase student workbooks and teaching guides to accompany each volume.

Keep reading and get more info on all our American History units for this year by visiting my website:


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Student guides:


Teacher's guide:


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Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24

In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool, American pioneers.

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Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. America’s Westward expansion was fueled by both Manifest Destiny and a desire to grow the nation and its resources — though at a cost:
As Americans continued to stream West on the name of Manifest Destiny, American Indians saw their lives changed forever as they moved from practising resistance to lives on reservations:

3 Books To Widen Your View of U.S. History

Rincey has three non-fiction books that provide some insight to neglected areas of U.S. History.

Books Mentioned
The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America by Andrés Reséndez
White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America by Nancy Isenberg
Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

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