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3 years of Computer Science in 8 minutes

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3 years of Computer Science in 8 minutes

This is the most asked question on my channel by far so I thought I'd explain how I learned programming. In the process I got a little distracted and accidentally explained all of computer science in 8 minutes (kind of).

The goal of this video was to show you the connections between modern day (high-level) programming and how it was implemented at the low level. I show you the basics in Java and convert it to C code, then into Assembly, which leads me to talk about how computers perform addition/subtraction, and the logic design behind that is all implemented with transistors. In case you couldn't tell, I love low level programming. Just a disclaimer that I'm not saying this is the best way to learn programming I am simply sharing what I feel was the most valuable in my learning so far. I know many people start with web technologies which can be a great introduction as well! I am currently teaching myself a lot of server networking & all that stuff. I just believe if you really want to understand how to design algorithms and solve problems in creative ways then the most valuable things you can learn are at the low level. Even though C is 40 years old it is still regarded as producing the most efficient code since you have full control over pointers and memory management with minimal overhead. (the only thing faster is assembly.. an even lower level)

Technical Resources!!
C Programming Language, 2nd Edition (Awesome Book):
Easy68K (Assembly Simulator):
Hexadecimal to Binary Conversions:
Two's Complement (Binary Addition/Subtraction):

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My 4 Years of Computer Science Education in 15 Minutes

Get FREE Guide:

My video, Learn Computer Science in 8 Hours:

In this video I'm going to share my entire 4 years of computer science education in 15 minutes!

This video was inspired by these YouTubers:

3 years of Computer Science in 8 minutes, by Devon Crawford:

My Whole Computer Science Degree in 12 Minutes, by Jarvis Johnson:

Read my full story here:

Recommended Resources:

Pluralsight:

In addition to many free resources, this is the online developer training I used to learn software development. Read my review here:

Programming textbook that I started out with:
This book played a part in inspiring me to become a programmer. This author does a great job of teaching the basics.

These books will help you achieve success beyond software development:
The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Power Lessons in Personal Change:
Linchpin: Are you Indispensable:
QBQ! The Question Behind the Question: Practicing Personal Accountability at Work and in Life:
How Successful People Think: Change Your Thinking, Change Your Life:
How Successful People Grow: 15 Ways to Get Ahead In Life:
How Successful People Win: Turn Every Setback into a Step Forward:
Soft Skills: The Software Developer’s Life Manual:

Connect:






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Disclaimer: This description contains affiliate links. This means that if you click on the links and purchase a product, I do receive a small commission. This helps support the work I do and allows me to continue bringing you guys valuable life changing content.
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Hardest Computer Science Course Explained | Angel of Death UoG

Since you guys really liked the last computer science video I decided to talk about my hardest CS course, nicknamed the angel of death at my school. It has a notoriously high fail rate for its assignments. You can expect to write a few thousand lines of C code in the first two assignments. This year we made a GEDCOM parser (which is actually what ancestry.com uses) to store information about family histories, allowing us to perform operations on family connections. In the second assignment we wrote a GEDCOM file writer, to create a GEDCOM file out of the memory objects. In the third assignment we used Node js and express to create a RESTful web server and UI for interacting with our parser. I tried to explain the file structure as best I could in a few minutes, so it will probably be very confusing to watch at first. The goal is to show you the complexities of the file structure, and how we built this web application to interface with our C API. This is basically how large scale cloud computing applications are made such as YouTube and Facebook.

GEDCOM Standard:

The point I want to make is that this course is not as hard as everybody makes it out to be. Just dedicate at least two weeks to the assignment and you will be fine. None of the algorithms or data structures were difficult, rather it was the massive amount of errors possible when writing such a parser from scratch. There are thousands of tags and conditions if you want to create a full parser and identify everything listed in the standard. Thankfully we only implemented about half of the full parser seen on the standard (link above).

|| Technologies used ||

GEDCOM Parser API:
- C

Web server:
- Node js with express framework
- RESTful server, ajax, JSON
- JavaScript

Client:
- HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Bootstrap

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Breaking Down My Computer Science Degree in 23 minutes

Learn what it takes to get a Computer Science degree and become a software developer. Understand the programming, data structures, and algorithms courses involved in a typical computer science college curriculum. In this video, I walk through my college educational experience, the technical class I took, and how I learned how to code.

Need some new tech gadgets or a new charger? Buy from my Amazon Storefront

Check out my podcast The Programmer Toolbox. If you leave us a written review on Apple Podcasts, we'll send you a free The Programmer Sticker. Just send us your mailing address at theprogrammertoolbox@gmail.com and we'll send it right out.



Also check out...
Make a Google Action
What is a Framework?
What is a JSON Object?
What is an API?
What are API Keys?
Using APIs with Postman

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My Computer Science Degree in 10 Minutes

A video for everyone who's thinking about doing a degree in Computer Science and wondering what type of courses and content a typical CS degree contains.

I did a BSc degree in CS at KTH in Stockholm, Sweden.

This video was inspired by Devon Crawford's video 3 years of computer science in 8 minutes:


Another similar video is Jarvis Johnson's My Whole Computer Science Degree in 12 Minutes:

Quantum Computing Expert Explains One Concept in 5 Levels of Difficulty | WIRED

WIRED has challenged IBM's Dr. Talia Gershon (Senior Manager, Quantum Research) to explain quantum computing to 5 different people; a child, teen, a college student, a grad student and a professional.

Still haven’t subscribed to WIRED on YouTube? ►►


ABOUT WIRED
WIRED is where tomorrow is realized. Through thought-provoking stories and videos, WIRED explores the future of business, innovation, and culture.

Quantum Computing Expert Explains One Concept in 5 Levels of Difficulty | WIRED
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Map of Computer Science

The field of computer science summarised. Learn more at this video's sponsor

Computer science is the subject that studies what computers can do and investigates the best ways you can solve the problems of the world with them. It is a huge field overlapping pure mathematics, engineering and many other scientific disciplines. In this video I summarise as much of the subject as I can and show how the areas are related to each other.

You can buy this poster here:
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Get all my other posters here:

A couple of notes on this video:
1. Some people have commented that I should have included computer security alongside hacking, and I completely agree, that was an oversight on my part. Apologies to all the computer security professionals, and thanks for all the hard work!
2. I also failed to mention interpreters alongside compilers in the complier section. Again, I’m kicking myself because of course this is an important concept for people to hear about. Also the layers of languages being compiled to other languages is overly convoluted, in practice it is more simple than this. I guess I should have picked one simple example.
3. NP-complete problems are possible to solve, they just become very difficult to solve very quickly as they get bigger. When I said NP-complete and then impossible to solve, I meant that the large NP-complete problems that industry is interested in solving were thought to be practically impossible to solve.

And free downloadable versions of this and the other posters here. If you want to print them out for educational purposes please do!

Thanks so much to my supporters on Patreon. If you enjoy my videos and would like to help me make more this is the best way and I appreciate it very much.

I also write a series of children’s science books call Professor Astro Cat, these links are to the publisher, but they are available in all good bookshops around the world in 18 languages and counting:
Frontiers of Space (age 7+):
Atomic Adventure (age 7+):
Intergalactic Activity Book (age 7+):
Solar System Book (age 3+, available in UK now, and rest of world in spring 2018):
Solar System App:
And the new Professor Astro Cat App:

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10 Years of Coding in 10 Minutes

Growth books:
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Links to all projects + more below ⬇️

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Daily Carry:

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good morning by Amine Maxwell
Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0
Music promoted by Audio Library

Hi, I'm John Fish, and I'm a Harvard Computer Science student. In this video, I talk about all of the various projects which I have completed in my ten year journey of coding. I started out learning basic HTML and CSS and making HTML tutorials and CSS tutorials. I then began learning Javascript and creating webpages with Javascript. Then, I began to learn Python and started contest programming. I then continued with Python, web programming, and picked up some other languages along the way. In this video I talk about my national-medal science fair project, Harvard Computer Science curriculum, Harvard Computer Science classes, Harvard Computer science projects, and so on. In this video I give examples of artificial intelligence programs which I have written and I explain basic artificial intelligence for games.

Links to all available projects in this video (some source code is private due to class policies--can't have people cheating🤥):
- Python coin flip script:
- jQuery dice rolling page:
- jQuery point plotting page:
- Python static site generator:
- Python OCR:
- Python Othello with minimax AI and alpha-beta pruning:
- Muse meditation project:
- Muse robotic hand:
- Social network for trees:
- Code learning platform:
- Clicky Kitty android game in Java:
- Science fair project measuring the growth rate of trees over time using google streetview images:
- Java reaction diffusion simulator:
- Java convex hull finder:
- Instagram bot thing:
- Eleven android game (Java):
- Shopify app I worked on for two years:
- Python sentiment analysis on comments:

Computer Science In 8 Minutes

Let's talk about all of the BASIC building blocks on Computer Science in 8 minutes.

Coding can seem scary and confusing at first, but if you take a step back and really break it down into smaller pieces, it doesn't seem so scary.

Here are basically all of the pieces of coding in 8 minutes!

**If you liked this video please smash that like button and subscribe to my channel so you don't miss out on more content like this!**

Representing Numbers and Letters with Binary: Crash Course Computer Science #4

Please take our PBS Digital Studios Survey!

Today, we’re going to take a look at how computers use a stream of 1s and 0s to represent all of our data - from our text messages and photos to music and webpages. We’re going to focus on how these binary values are used to represent numbers and letters, and discuss how our need to perform operations on larger and more complex values brought us from our 8-bit video games to beautiful Instagram photos, and from unreadable garbled text in our emails to a universal language encoding scheme.


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Early Computing: Crash Course Computer Science #1

Hello, world! Welcome to Crash Course Computer Science! So today, we’re going to take a look at computing’s origins, because even though our digital computers are relatively new, the need for computation is not. Since the start of civilization itself, humans have had an increasing need for special devices to help manage laborious tasks, and as the scale of society continued to grow, these computational devices began to play a crucial role in amplifying our mental abilities. From the abacus and astrolabe to the difference engine and tabulating machine, we’ve come a long way to satisfying this increasing need, and in the process completely transformed commerce, government, and daily life.

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A delightful way to teach kids about computers | Linda Liukas

Computer code is the next universal language, and its syntax will be limited only by the imaginations of the next generation of programmers. Linda Liukas is helping to educate problem-solving kids, encouraging them to see computers not as mechanical, boring and complicated but as colorful, expressive machines meant to be tinkered with. In this talk, she invites us to imagine a world where the Ada Lovelaces of tomorrow grow up to be optimistic and brave about technology and use it to create a new world that is wonderful, whimsical and a tiny bit weird.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
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Object-oriented Programming in 7 minutes | Mosh

Get the COMPLETE COURSE:

4 pillars of object-oriented programming: encapsulation, abstraction, inheritance and polymorphism.

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14-Year-Old Prodigy Programmer Dreams In Code

Fourteen-year-old programmer and software developer Santiago Gonzalez might just be the next Steve Jobs. He already has 15 iOS apps to his name and dreams of designing for Apple. At age 12, Santiago became a full-time college student and is on track to earn his bachelor's degree in computer science and electrical engineering by age 16. By 17, when most teenagers are excited to just have their driver's license, Santiago will have his masters degree.

A self-professed computer nerd, Santiago is fluent in a dozen different programming languages and thousands of people have downloaded his apps for the Mac, iPhone and iPad.

Learn how Santiago's parents overcame a rigid school system that left their son intellectually stifled and depressed and instead followed an unconventional pathway to nurture his incredible gifts. Santiago's story is truly inspiring and his family's experience provides a powerful model for parents of exceptionally gifted children.

PRODIGIES is a bi-weekly series showcasing the youngest and brightest as they challenge themselves to reach new heights and the stories behind them.

Created and produced by @radical.media, THNKR gives you extraordinary access to the people, stories, places and thinking that will change your mind.

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Day in the Life of a Computer Science Student | UoG

This is what I'm doing when I'm not posting YouTube videos. For a change I decided to film what I do at school, and show you guys some actual problems that software developers have to solve.

There's not much content on YouTube which actually shows real software dev, usually people just talk and don't really explain what they're doing. I want to take it upon myself to show what actually happens when writing software and if there's enough interest I can make videos as I am programming some new personal projects. On those I can actually show you guys code, and do whatever I want.

FAQ
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What year / major / school?
- Second year computer science at university of guelph

What language?
- Almost everything for my assignments is written in C, I've had one Java course. Personally I know Java the most, then C, some web stuff for my website (HTML, CSS, Javascript, Bootstrap), as well as R for stats courses. Oh and assembly haha that was fun.

How old is u?
- 19

Where u at?
- Canada

Why did u quit ur gaming channel?
- I want to be productive and create cool shit. Been working on many interesting side projects that I usually keep separate from YouTube but thinking about making videos about them. Gaming videos feel like a dead end for me creatively.

When can you post another video?
- When I'm not a slave to the education system (if everyone sent me a nice sum of money I could start my own company and be set, in the meantime subscribe and follow all my social medias will help)

Can I see some code / what's next??
- ye look at my github (link under socials)

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- Desk Microphone (Blue Yeti):
- DSLR (Canon T7i):
- Wide Lens (Tokina 11-16mm F2.8):
- Full list of gear:

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a l e x - Growing Up, Vol. 1 [preview]
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a l e x - double scoop [forthcoming]
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Computer Networks: Crash Course Computer Science #28

Today we start a three episode arc on the rise of a global telecommunications network that changed the world forever. We’re going to begin with computer networks, and how they grew from small groups of connected computers on LAN networks to eventually larger worldwide networks like the ARPANET and even the Internet we know today. We'll also discuss how many technologies like Ethernet, MAC addresses, IP Addresses, packet switching, network switches, and TCP/IP were implemented to new problems as our computers became ever-increasingly connected. Next week we’ll talk about the Internet, and the week after the World Wide Web!

Pre-order our limited edition Crash Course: Computer Science Floppy Disk Coasters here!


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7 Years of Coding Startups in 7 Minutes

I started programming 7 years ago because I wanted to be an entrepreneur. It took a lot of failures to get to where I am now with a startup and a couple of side income streams.

In this video I share the experiences which have been most crucial to my career development, as a game developer/designer, software engineer, and startup founder!

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Music from MusicBed
Dexter Britain - The Time To Run (Finale):
Flyers - Won't Come Down (Instrumental):

Intro to Algorithms: Crash Course Computer Science #13

Algorithms are the sets of steps necessary to complete computation - they are at the heart of what our devices actually do. And this isn’t a new concept. Since the development of math itself algorithms have been needed to help us complete tasks more efficiently, but today we’re going to take a look a couple modern computing problems like sorting and graph search, and show how we’ve made them more efficient so you can more easily find cheap airfare or map directions to Winterfell... or like a restaurant or something.

Ps. Have you had the chance to play the Grace Hopper game we made in episode 12. Check it out here!

CORRECTION:
In the pseudocode for selection sort at 3:09, this line:
swap array items at index and smallest
should be:
swap array items at i and smallest

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5 Year Degree in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering in 9 minutes

A day in the life of a software engineer. I am trying with the best possible way to show you how is my day as a software engineer and at the same time as a University student in Electrical and Computer Engineering.
A typical and not at all fictional day in my life as a software engineer.
Get an inside look at a typical day in the life of me, a software engineer.
Today's episode: 5 Year Degree in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering in 9 minutes

In case you want to take the Vlog programming stories from the beginning and you don't know where to start, here they are in chronological order:



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Data Structures: Crash Course Computer Science #14

Today we’re going to talk about on how we organize the data we use on our devices. You might remember last episode we walked through some sorting algorithms, but skipped over how the information actually got there in the first place! And it is this ability to store and access information in a structured and meaningful way that is crucial to programming. From strings, pointers, and nodes, to heaps, trees, and stacks get ready for an ARRAY of new terminology and concepts.

Ps. Have you had the chance to play the Grace Hopper game we made in episode 12. Check it out here!

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