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A Long Night In Space: Exploring Jupiter And Mars | space and astronomy

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A Long Night In Space: Exploring Jupiter And Mars | space and astronomy

Welcome to Jupiter, a world so roomy that it could swallow every planet and moon in the solar system and still have room for more. Yet for all its bulk there is nowhere to land, just an infernal drop into a bottomless sky.

Mars is the ruby jewel in our night sky and arguably the hottest travel destination in the Solar System. Here, on the fourth rock from the Sun, is our best chance to step into the rest of the Universe and the most likely place we know to encounter the alien life-forms we might share it with.

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A Long Night In Space: Exploring Saturn And Venus | space and astronomy

Are there planets in our solar system on which life is possible when the resources of our home planet Earth are exhausted? In this multi-part documentary, we take a closer look at the characteristics of the various planets.

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Discovering Jupiter – A Planet worth living on? (1/8) | space and astronomy

Are there planets in our solar system on which life is possible when the resources of our home planet Earth are exhausted? In this multi-part documentary, we take a closer look at the characteristics of the various planets.

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#jupiter #discoveringspace #nasa
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JUPITER - A Travelers' Guide to the Planets | Full Documentary

Welcome to Jupiter, a world so roomy that it could swallow every planet and moon in the solar system and still have room for more. Yet for all its bulk there is nowhere to land, just an infernal drop into a bottomless sky.

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Exploring Jupiter Facts, Space, Science, Astronomy

Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun and the largest in the Solar System. It is a giant planet with a mass one-thousandth that of the Sun, but two-and-a-half times that of all the other planets in the Solar System combined. Jupiter and Saturn are gas giants; the other two giant planets, Uranus and Neptune, are ice giants. Jupiter has been known to astronomers since antiquity. It is named after the Roman god Jupiter. When viewed from Earth, Jupiter can reach an apparent magnitude of −2.94, bright enough for its reflected light to cast shadows, and making it on average the third-brightest natural object in the night sky after the Moon and Venus.

Jupiter is primarily composed of hydrogen with a quarter of its mass being helium, though helium comprises only about a tenth of the number of molecules. It may also have a rocky core of heavier elements, but like the other giant planets, Jupiter lacks a well-defined solid surface. Because of its rapid rotation, the planet's shape is that of an oblate spheroid (it has a slight but noticeable bulge around the equator). The outer atmosphere is visibly segregated into several bands at different latitudes, resulting in turbulence and storms along their interacting boundaries. A prominent result is the Great Red Spot, a giant storm that is known to have existed since at least the 17th century when it was first seen by telescope. Surrounding Jupiter is a faint planetary ring system and a powerful magnetosphere. Jupiter has 79 known moons, including the four large Galilean moons discovered by Galileo Galilei in 1610. Ganymede, the largest of these, has a diameter greater than that of the planet Mercury.

Jupiter has been explored on several occasions by robotic spacecraft, most notably during the early Pioneer and Voyager flyby missions and later by the Galileo orbiter. In late February 2007, Jupiter was visited by the New Horizons probe, which used Jupiter's gravity to increase its speed and bend its trajectory en route to Pluto. The latest probe to visit the planet. Future targets for exploration in the Jupiter system include the probable ice-covered liquid ocean of its moon Europa.

NASA’s Juno Mission: What’s New at Jupiter?

Planetary scientist Dr. Fran Bagenal of the University of Colorado – Boulder discusses how the Juno mission has changed our views of Jupiter. This was the second presentation in the Lunar and Planetary Institute’s 2018–2019 Cosmic Exploration Speaker Series, “The LPI at 50: A Half Century of Solar System Exploration.”

July Night Sky: See Planets & Constellations | Video

See when to see the Venus and Saturn, as well as constellations in the night sky, in July 2013 in this skywatching video guide.

Mars - Beautiful Places and Sceneries

This part of the documentary Mars - A Travelers Guide to the Planets shows the most beautiful places on Mars. Which sceneries would we see if we could travel to Mars in person?

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Jupiter and Earth are at Their Closest as Juno Closes In | Video

More space news and info at: - Jupiter will be at its closest to Earth on March 8, 2016.

The giant planet will be up all night, soaring almost overhead at midnight and not setting until the sky brightens with the twilight hues of sunrise on March 9th. In July, the Juno mission will give us an even closer look.

Please rate and comment, thanks!

Dr. David Williams - Exploring The Solar System - National Space Society (Phoenix)

21 June 2014: Exploring the Solar System
National Space Society - Phoenix
Presentation by Dr. David A. Williams of ASU School of Earth & Space Exploration
Roving the Solar System: Recent Results from NASA Missions

Dr. David A. Williams is a Faculty Research Associate in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State

University, Tempe, Arizona. Dr. Williams is the Director of the NASA Regional Planetary Image Facility at ASU and the NASA

Planetary Aeolian Laboratory at the Ames Research Center in California. David is currently performing research in

volcanology and planetary geology, with a focus on planetary mapping, geochemical, and remote sensing studies. His research

has included computer modeling of seismic wave propagation through planetary interiors, visible and near-infrared

spectroscopy of the lunar surface, planetary geologic mapping of the satellites of Jupiter and the planet Mars, computer

modeling of the physical and geochemical evolution of lava flows in a variety of planetary environments, and petrologic

study of lava samples from Mount St Helens. He was involved with NASA's Magellan Mission to Venus and Galileo Mission to

Jupiter. He is a Co-Investigator on the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter mission, and he is currently serving

as a Participating Scientist on NASA's Dawn Mission to asteroid 4 Vesta. David is the immediate Past Chair of the Planetary

Geology Division of the Geological Society of America, has served on several NASA committees including the 2007 Jovian

System Observer Science Definition Team, and is currently a steering committee member of the NASA Outer Planets Advisory

Group.

Videos:
New Heliospheric Research:
NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory
Coronal Rain falling along Magnetic Field Lines
(UV, 304 Angstroms, July 19, 2012)


MESSENGER: MErcury: Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging
False Color Global Imaging from Nominal Mission
February 25, 2013


Flying by a Venus Volcano
Topography and heat data suggesting signs of recent lava flows on the surface of Venus are revealed in this 360-degree view

of the planet's volcanic peak Idunn Mons.


LROC WAC Global Mosaic and DTM
The WAC 100 m/pixel global mosaic is comprised of over 15,000 images acquired between November 2009 and February 2011. The

WAC 100 m/pixel global DTM was derived from over 44,000 WAC stereo models from primary phase. The highest elevation (white)

is 10,760 meters, and the lowest elevation (purple) is -9150 meters. Visit our website for the full resolution video and

images.


Hubble ST Rotation Movie of Asteroid 4 Vesta


Dawn_Vesta_Asteroid_Full_Rotation_2011_NASA_JPL_22sec_720_HD



NASA_Sees_Curiosity_Rover_s_Parachute_Flapping_in_Martian_Wind



12 mile high dust devil in Amazonis Planitia


Recurring Slope Linea
December, 2013


Soaring Over Titan: Extraterrestrial Land of Lakes
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory


Volcanic Activity on Jupiter's moon Io


Animation: Asteroid Redirect Mission

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Jupiter's Moon Europa May Have a Deep Ocean | Space Video

More space news and info at: - if Jupiter's moon Europa has a subsurface ocean, it could have the right conditions for life.

Please rate and comment, thanks!

Mercury 101 | National Geographic

The planet Mercury is named after the messenger of the Roman gods because of its fleeting nature across the sky. Find out the reason behind its incredible speed, if it is indeed the hottest planet in the Solar System, and why the smallest planet in the solar system is slowly shrinking.
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Mercury 101 | National Geographic


National Geographic

Long Night in the Computer Lab

Nate's Vlog Part 3 #43, October 16 - 22.

Music: Jeff Kaale
Engelwood
Andrew Applepie

Shot On: iPhone 7

SATURN - A Traveler's Guide to the Planets | Full Documentary

Take a trip to the planetary pin-up boy Saturn, and get a ringside seat to the greatest spectacle in the solar system, and a close encounter with two extraordinary moons.

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Introduction to the Solar System: Crash Course Astronomy #9

In today's Crash Course Astronomy, Phil takes a look at the explosive history of our cosmic backyard. We explore how we went from a giant ball of gas to the system of planets and other celestial objects we have today.

This episode is sponsored by Squarespace:
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Makeup of a Solar System 2:38
From Gas to a Disc 5:36
Planet Formation Depends on Distance to Sun 7:14
Motion of a System 8:21

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PHOTO/VIDEO CREDITS
Sun: [credit: NASA/ESA]
Jupiter: [credit: NASA/ESA]
Geocentric celestial spheres; Peter Apian's Cosmographia (Antwerp, 1539):
Ganymede:
Mercury: [credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington]
Understanding Solar System Dynamics: Orbits and Kepler's Laws (2008):
Mercury:
Venus:
Earth:
Mars:
Jupiter:
Saturn: [credit: Photo by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute/Gordan Ugarkovic]
Uranus:
Neptune:
[credit: JHUAPL/SwRI/Dan Durda]
Bennu’s Journey:

Artist's impression of a protoplanetary disk:
Rocky Ring of Debris Around Vega: [image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech]
Proplyds in the Orion Nebula:
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Scott Bolton | The Juno Mission to Jupiter | NEAF Talks

Filmed April 2017
Juno is one of NASA's three New Frontiers probes. Juno's mission is to measure Jupiter's composition, gravity field, magnetic field, and polar magnetosphere. It will also search for clues about how the planet formed, including whether it has a rocky core, the amount of water present within the deep atmosphere, mass distribution, and its deep winds, which can reach speeds up to 618 kilometers per hour (384 mph). Juno was built by Lockheed Martin and is operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on August 5, 2011 and entered a polar orbit of Jupiter on July 5, 2016.

Who is Scott Bolton?
SCOTT BOLTON Bolton is the principal investigator for Juno, a mission launched in 2011 to study Jupiter’s origin, atmosphere, magnetosphere and interior structure, part of NASA’s New Frontiers program to explore the outer planets of the solar system. Bolton previously served on the Galileo mission as a member of the plasma spectrometer team and plasma wave instrument team. Dr. Bolton chaired the Titan science group for the Cassini-Huygens mission and was responsible for the formulation of the scientific investigation of Saturn’s moon Titan. Dr. Bolton has been a Principal Investigator with NASA on various research programs since 1988. His research includes the modeling of the Jovian and Saturnian radiation belts, atmospheric dynamics and composition, and the formation and evolution of the solar system. He has authored over 250 scientific papers, five book chapters, and consulted/appeared in five space science documentaries. He also received JPL Individual Awards for Exceptional Excellence in Leadership in 2002, 2001, and 1996, and Excellence in Management in 2000; and has received over twenty NASA Group Achievement Awards.

NEAF Talks brings you the best from the annual NEAF Astronomy & Space conference which is held just outside of New York City at the RCC campus of the State University of New York. The Northeast Astronomy Forum is in its 26th year and is a world-renowned symposium which annually searches the globe for the most relevant personalities who are making space, science and astronomy history today. Now through NEAF Talks online, these outstanding lectures are available to classrooms, universities,
professionals and the world- free of charge. Visit RocklandAstronomy.com/NEAF for more information
or to learn how to see NEAF live.
NEAF Talks- supporting science and astronomy education for a quarter-century, now free to the world
via the web.

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Jupiter's Moons

... Jupiter's Moons with Jane Houston Jones at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California.

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Jupiter has 63 confirmed moons, giving it the largest retinue of moons with reasonably secure orbits of any planet in the Solar System.

The most massive of them, the four Galilean moons, were discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei and were the first objects found to orbit a body that was neither Earth nor the Sun.

From the end of the 19th century, dozens of much smaller Jovian moons have been discovered and have received the names of lovers, conquests, or daughters of the Roman god Jupiter, or his Greek equivalent, Zeus.

The Galileans are far and away the largest objects in orbit around Jupiter, with the remaining 59 moons and the rings together comprising just 0.003 percent of the total orbiting mass.



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Jupiters largest moons were first seen 400 years ago in early 1610. On the seventh of January, 1610 in Padua, Italy, Galileo looked up above the constellation Orion. He aimed his telescope at the well-known starry wanderer, the planet Jupiter, which was near Orion that night.

What he saw through his telescope startled him and marked the beginning of modern astronomy.Jupiter was not just one object, as he wrote and drew in his journal. There are three stars in the heavens moving about Jupiter, as Venus and Mercury around the sun, he wrote.

Galileos January 7 observation showed three stars. The one star to the west was Ganymede. And to the east there were two objects.One was the moon Callisto. And the other was a tight pairing of Io and Europa. Io and Europa appeared so close together they looked like one object in Galileos modest telescopic view.

On January 8 he saw a different lineup altogether. There were three stars on one side of the planet. Io was the moon closest to the planet, followed by Europa and Ganymede. Two cloudy nights and two additional observations later, on January 13 Galileo identified a fourth object orbiting Jupiter.

The arrangement this night turned out to be Europa on the east and Ganymede, Io and Callisto on the west. On January 15 all four stars were seen on one side of the planet. Everyone who aims a modest telescope, or even binoculars, at Jupiter will see the same view that Galileo did.

The views of tiny moons orbiting the king of the planets will surprise and delight all who look up. [ Jupiter is hard to see in the evening sky this month. But northern hemisphere observers may see Jupiter and Venus close together, low on the southwestern horizon, on Valentines Day.

Then it will be a few months wait until Jupiter becomes visible in the morning sky. By August you can once again view Jupiter and the four Galilean moons after dinner or as soon as the sun sets and the stars come out. NASAs Galileo Mission, which ended in 2003, changed the way we look at our solar system.

It found evidence of subsurface saltwater on Europa, Ganymede and Callisto and intense volcanic activity on Io. NASAs JUNO Mission will launch in 2011 on a mission to study Jupiter. And the Europa-Jupiter System Mission, a joint mission of the European Space Agency and NASA, is slated to launch in 2020.It will primarily study Jupiters moons Europa and Ganymede and Jupiters magnetosphere.


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All About Jupiter for Children: Astronomy and Space for Kids - FreeSchool

- Help support more content like this!
Jupiter is the largest planet in the solar system, more than twice as massive as all of the other planets put together! The third-brightest object in the night sky, it's made of gasses, it has more than 60 moons, and it's the stormiest planet in the solar system. Jupiter is amazing!

Like this video if you want more videos about SPACE!

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Music: Jaunty Gumption, The Other Side of the Door - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)

Some footage provided courtesy of NASA.

Solar System Explained in Telugu | The Journey of the Universe Episode - 4 | Telugu Badi

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Solar System Explained in Telugu:
Our solar system consists of our star, the Sun, and everything bound to it by gravity — the planets Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, dwarf planets such as Pluto, dozens of moons and millions of asteroids, comets and meteoroids.
Watch full video to know How solar system works? Why pluto is not a planet?
Is it safe to live on Mars? and more...


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Space Compilation: Crash Course Kids

Maybe you'd like to just hear about one topic for a while. We understand. Thus, we've created our Compilation Series. In this video, we look at some of our videos about Space. Sabrina talks to us about the Sun, stars, the universe, and how constellations work. Enjoy, Like, Share, and Subscribe! :)

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Credits...
Producer & Editor: Nicholas Jenkins
Cinematographer & Director: Michael Aranda
Host: Sabrina Cruz
Script Supervisor: Mickie Halpern
Writer: Allyson Shaw and Kay Boatner
Executive Producers: John & Hank Green
Consultant: Shelby Alinsky
Script Editor: Blake de Pastino

Thought Cafe Team:
Stephanie Bailis
Cody Brown
Suzanna Brusikiewicz
Jonathan Corbiere
Nick Counter
Kelsey Heinrichs
Jack Kenedy
Corey MacDonald
Tyler Sammy
Nikkie Stinchcombe
James Tuer
Adam Winnik

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