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A Mass Timber Case Study: The Earth Systems Science Building, UBC -- (Part 4 of 5)

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A Mass Timber Case Study: The Earth Systems Science Building, UBC -- (Part 4 of 5)



The University of British Columbia's Earth Sciences Building has an extensive and innovative use of cross laminated timber. The facility has two five-storey wings connected by an atrium, and provides modern learning spaces for earth sciences students and leading-edge laboratories for researchers.

A five-storey cantilevered staircase in the atrium built entirely of solid timber is the first of its kind in the world. Being column free, the staircase is a captivating work of art. The building has a hybrid floor system of wood and concrete that is lighter than solid concrete and provides excellent sound absorption.

To learn more, visit

Future of Mid-Rise and Mass Timber Wood Construction in B.C. (Part 5 of 5)



Advancements in wood technology, systems and products, together with performance-based building codes have fueled interest in building with mass timber in mid-rise construction and even taller buildings.

Developments in both wood frame and mass timber are bringing mid-rise wood buildings to a new level of affordability and transforming our understanding of what is possible with wood construction.

Wood also plays a key role in reducing a project's environmental footprint. Wood products have less embodied energy, are responsible for lower air and water pollution, and have a lighter carbon footprint than other commonly used building materials.

To learn more, visit
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Brock Commons Time Lapse - UBC Tall Wood Building



Brock Commons Phase 1 is an 18-storey hybrid mass timber residence at the University of British Columbia (UBC). The building is comprised of 17 storeys of mass timber construction above a concrete podium and two concrete stair cores. The floor structure consists of 5-ply cross laminated timber (CLT) panels supported on glue laminated timber (glulam) columns. The roof is made of prefabricated sections of steel beams and metal decking.

Brock Commons will have capacity for just over 400 students with floorplans ranging from single bed studios to 4-bed accommodations. Study and social spaces will be located on the ground floor with a student lounge on the 18th floor, where the wood structure will be left exposed for demonstration and educational purposes.

Wood, a renewable material, was chosen in part to reflect the university’s commitment to sustainability. The building was also designed to meet LEED Gold certification.

The estimated avoided and sequestered greenhouse gases from the wood used in the building is equivalent to removing 511 cars off the road for a year. The total carbon dioxide equivalent avoided by using wood products over other materials in the building is more than 2,432 metric tonnes. Learn more about tall wood buildings at

**Estimated by the Wood Carbon Calculator for Buildings, based on research by Sathre, R. and J. O’Connor, 2010, A Synthesis of Research on Wood Products and Greenhouse Gas Impacts, FPInnovations (this relates to carbon stored and avoided GHG).
**CO2 refers to CO2 equivalent.

Footage in this video is based on the documentation of the UBC CIRS research team:
Erik A Poirer, PhD
Thomas Tannert, PhD
Azadeh Fallahi, BSc
Manu Moudgil, BSc
Shery Staub-French, PhD
Thomas Froese, PhD

Introduction to Brock Commons - UBC Tall Wood Building



Brock Commons Tallwood House is an 18-storey mass timber hybrid residence at the University of British Columbia (UBC). The building is comprised of 17 storeys of mass timber construction above a concrete podium and two concrete stair cores. The floor structure will consist of 5-ply cross laminated timber (CLT) panels supported on glue laminated timber (glulam) columns. The roof will be made of prefabricated sections of steel beams and metal decking.

Brock Commons will have capacity for just over 400 students with floorplans ranging from single bed studios to 4-bed accommodations. Study and social spaces will be located on the ground floor with a student lounge on the 18th floor, where the wood structure will be left exposed for demonstration and educational purposes.

Wood, a renewable material, was chosen in part to reflect the university’s commitment to sustainability. The building was also designed to meet LEED Gold certification.

The estimated avoided and sequestered greenhouse gases from the wood used in the building is equivalent to removing 511 cars off the road for a year. The total carbon dioxide equivalent avoided by using wood products over other materials in the building is more than 2,432 metric tonnes. Learn more about tall wood buildings at

***Estimated by the Wood Carbon Calculator for Buildings, based on research by Sathre, R. and J. O’Connor, 2010, A Synthesis of Research on Wood Products and Greenhouse Gas Impacts, FPInnovations (this relates to carbon stored and avoided GHG).
***CO2 refers to CO2 equivalent.
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Engineered Timber

Engineered Glulam Trusses services provided by Western Wood Structures.

Brock Commons Tallwood House - Chapter 3: Construction Process

Construction of the mass timber structure at the University of British Columbia’s Brock Commons Tallwood House took about nine weeks —two month ahead of schedule.

The average speed of the mass timber erection and envelope installation was two floors per week. This included the columns and CLT panels, encapsulation of the wood components with gypsum board, the pouring of a concrete topping, and installation of the envelope panels.

Having an integrated design team at the beginning of the project, as well as maximizing prefabricated wood components led to less traffic, reduced waste and a quieter, smaller site.

Learn more about the design process in Chapter 2:

For more information on Brock Commons Tallwood House visit
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Mass Timber in Vermont and Beyond: Products, Projects and the Case for Local Timber

Brock Commons Tallwood House - Chapter 2: Design Process

The integrated design process for Brock Commons Tallwood House, an 18 storey mass timber hybrid student resident at the University of British Columbia, emphasized the project as a whole. The design and construction teams were engaged at the very beginning of design, which led to efficiencies throughout the project.

A physical mock-up and 3D modelling software were used during the design phase. The mock-up allowed the team to test different types of connections, while the 3D modelling allowed the team to test different design solutions and sequence construction. This pre-planning ultimately cut down on construction time.

Learn more about the construction process in Chapter 3:

For more information on Brock Commons Tallwood House visit

History of Wood Construction and Forest Management in B.C. (Part 1 of 5)



British Columbia (B.C.), Canada has a long history of using wood in construction. From the timber products used in the heritage buildings located in Gastown, to six-storey multi-family residential homes throughout the Province.

Even in the 1800's, B.C. was showcasing its expertise and building up to nine storey with wood. The historical buildings of Gastown showcase innovative connections and systems using timber products. The flexible floor plans and structural integrity of the buildings are a true testament to the craftsmanship of the time period.

The forestry industry in B.C. has long since been a strong contributor to the economy and the province continues be an international leader in sustainable forest management. B.C.'s forestlands are unique among worldwide producers in that 95% are publicly owned and subject to strict forest-management laws. This is backed by a comprehensive compliance and enforcement process that involves various provincial and federal agencies.

To learn more, visit

Innovation in Mass Timber Construction

Adera has always pushed the boundaries of innovation to deliver the best value to its homeowners. With multiple award-winning projects in Wesbrook Village and achieving the first-ever REAP Platinum home certification at UBC, Adera continues to lead the industry with sustainable construction methods and technologies.

Watch this video to learn how Adera is designing North America’s first multi-family mass timber development at Virtuoso with Structurlam CLT, setting new standards in intelligent wood design to bring more safe and sustainable benefits to their homes.

Visit us at
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Mass Timber for Mass Market

The 2016 Mass Timber Conference was produced by Forest Business Network and WoodWorks.



Mass Timber’s window of opportunity to conquer the mid-rise market is now wide open. With the introduction of mass timber to the building codes in the U.S. and Canada, these buildings are quickly moving beyond pilot projects. Densification of North American cities resulting in many 6-8 story buildings (the sweet spot for Tall Wood) presents an unprecedented opportunity for mass timber. These mid-rise buildings can easily be more energy efficient, built faster, and more economical.

The seminar will present Equilibrium’s journey from being early mass timber adopters, through pilot projects, to typical city mid-rise developments both in Canada and the U.S.

KIELY Case Study: Design-Build

When a publicly-traded utility company in Southern New Jersey began planning their largest-ever Design-Build project, they called on the Kiely Family of Companies: sharing their vision, and partnering with KIELY to make it happen.
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Wood Design and Construction in Mid-Rise Buildings (Part 3 of 5)



When it comes to mid-rise development, architects have a code-compliant, cost-effective resource in wood. Over the years, wood frame construction has shown strength, longevity and stability, and is widely considered economical.

Mid-rise wood frame buildings are designed and built with innovative products and state-of-the-art engineering techniques. Fire risks are analyzed and assessed by experts and safety performance that meets the building code is commonly demonstrated through alternative solutions.

To learn more, visit

The Design, Fabrication and Wood Construction of the Richmond Olympic Oval

naturallywood.com

This video outlines the design, fabrication and construction of the composite glulam beam arches and WoodWave structural panels. The WoodWave panels are designed to span between the primary wood-steel arches.

Interviews with the City of Richmond, Cannon Design (lead architect) and Fast + Epp (engineer) helps tell the story of the design and process of building the one-of-a-kind Richmond Olympic Oval for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics.

Video developed by Canadian Wood Council ( and Wood WORKS! BC (

Visit naturallywood.com/design-environment for more info on green building tools and guidelines.

BuildingShopCLTFinal

South Dakota State University collaborative project. These are the processes and efforts put in by everyone in the class.
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DES603 - Fire Tests in Support of Tall Mass Timber Buildings

For more information and education credit:
awc.org/education/main/lists/des-design-considerations/des603-fire-tests-in-support-of-tall-mass-timber-buildings

Timber Skyscrapers: Innovations in Wood Architecture & Design

As part of the Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry's Art of Wood event series made possible by funding from the Ball Foundation, visiting architects Michael Green and Andrew Waugh presented the latest in timber-based architecture and design. Andrew Waugh presents Waugh Thistleton's 9 storey building made from cross-laminated timber (CLT). Waugh and Green also talk about their new project: Finding the Forest Through the Trees (FFTT). The FFTT project is an innovative, open source plan for building tall wood buildings through a strong column-weak beam balloon-frame approach that uses large format mass timber panels for vertical structure.

Mid-Rise Construction in B.C. (Part 2 of 5)



Mid-rise construction (four to six storeys) is becoming increasingly popular as a means of boosting densification, containing urban sprawl, and respecting infrastructure limits while maintaining neighbourhood charm and community appeal. Mid-rise wood frame construction is often faster, material costs can be lower, and construction is simpler.

In British Columbia, mid-rise wood frame construction of five and six storey buildings has proven popular with developers, architects and contractors. These projects vary in size, scope and style with new and creative ways of applying traditional wood products are continually being developed. In Kamloops, B.C., Library Square is one of the first mid-rise wood frame construction in the province.

To learn more, visit

#TradeShowTV | Tallest Wood Building, LEED v4 @Naturally Wood | BUILDEX 2019 feat. Chandel Diebold

For more information, please visit
To contact Chandel Diebold from Naturally Wood / FII:
chandel.diebold@bcfii.ca

Ever hear about the tallest wood buildings in the world? This is not your Jenga structure you built over some red wine.

This is the BROCK COMMONS TALLWOOD HOUSE, a hybrid mass timber structure, 18 storeys high. For a moment in time, this was one of the tallest wood buildings in the world. And we haven't even started talking about its LEED v4 GOLD certification...

Learn more about impressive sustainable innovations here:


Want to meet the top players in the building industry?
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Tune in for live trade show coverage, and hilariously exclusive interviews...

Your hosts, Keith & Adel from AL13 will be interviewing the people making waves in the building materials space.

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ACM Panels cut to fit on-site without any off-site fabrication.
V-Line Planks to achieve a woodgrain look, without moisture or cracking.

Founded by installers for installers.

Lessons Learned Installing Mass Timber

The 2016 Mass Timber Conference was produced by Forest Business Network and WoodWorks.



Bensonwood has built a few mass timber projects recently and learned some things along the way. CLT, glulam, and heavy decking all have issues to think about, but the process from design through engineering and detailing is critical too. MEP coordination is often incomplete, and BIM coordination is difficult to do correctly even if all the information is available due to software interoperability limitations.

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