This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

A Mass Timber Case Study: The Earth Systems Science Building, UBC -- (Part 4 of 5)

x

Back to UBC during COVID-19 | Master of International Forestry | Faculty of Forestry

Today is my first time returning back to school ever since the COVID-19 campus shutdown. Same place, things are different. I miss my master's program and love the people so much! Couldn't have a better time...
x

Brock Commons Time Lapse - UBC Tall Wood Building



Brock Commons Phase 1 is an 18-storey hybrid mass timber residence at the University of British Columbia (UBC). The building is comprised of 17 storeys of mass timber construction above a concrete podium and two concrete stair cores. The floor structure consists of 5-ply cross laminated timber (CLT) panels supported on glue laminated timber (glulam) columns. The roof is made of prefabricated sections of steel beams and metal decking.

Brock Commons will have capacity for just over 400 students with floorplans ranging from single bed studios to 4-bed accommodations. Study and social spaces will be located on the ground floor with a student lounge on the 18th floor, where the wood structure will be left exposed for demonstration and educational purposes.

Wood, a renewable material, was chosen in part to reflect the university’s commitment to sustainability. The building was also designed to meet LEED Gold certification.

The estimated avoided and sequestered greenhouse gases from the wood used in the building is equivalent to removing 511 cars off the road for a year. The total carbon dioxide equivalent avoided by using wood products over other materials in the building is more than 2,432 metric tonnes. Learn more about tall wood buildings at

**Estimated by the Wood Carbon Calculator for Buildings, based on research by Sathre, R. and J. O’Connor, 2010, A Synthesis of Research on Wood Products and Greenhouse Gas Impacts, FPInnovations (this relates to carbon stored and avoided GHG).
**CO2 refers to CO2 equivalent.

Footage in this video is based on the documentation of the UBC CIRS research team:
Erik A Poirer, PhD
Thomas Tannert, PhD
Azadeh Fallahi, BSc
Manu Moudgil, BSc
Shery Staub-French, PhD
Thomas Froese, PhD
x

Innovation in Mass Timber Construction

Adera has always pushed the boundaries of innovation to deliver the best value to its homeowners. With multiple award-winning projects in Wesbrook Village and achieving the first-ever REAP Platinum home certification at UBC, Adera continues to lead the industry with sustainable construction methods and technologies.

Watch this video to learn how Adera is designing North America’s first multi-family mass timber development at Virtuoso with Structurlam CLT, setting new standards in intelligent wood design to bring more safe and sustainable benefits to their homes.

Visit us at
x

Advancing the Architecture of Mass Timber

In face of climate change, building with wood is the architecture and construction industries' chance to challenge norms and drive the world's aspirations towards zero carbon emissions. This presentation will demonstrate the potentials of advanced wood design and construction at scales from x-small to x-large. We will present two Vancouver projects designed by Perkins and Will with world class innovation in-mind, and with aspirations to be a catalyst for change and connection with the city: The red Pavilion at Emily Carr University, and the Canada Earth Tower.

The Pavilion is both a landmark sculpture and a small coffee house building that anchors the regeneration of the False Creek Flats area. The structure takes inspiration from flowers - and is a layered composition of mass timber shell petals, digitally manufactured and assembled on site. The design process of the pavilion connects the dots between design, technological innovation, and hands-on physical construction.

Canada Earth Tower on the other hand, will become the world's tallest hybrid wood tower once approved in Vancouver. At 40 stories, the building will illustrate the advancements in tall wood engineering and construction. Beyond timber, the project will be a zero emissions development that will take energy standards to an unprecedented level with rigorous high passive house standards and dramatic reduction of the project's greenhouse gas emissions through carbon sequestration.

Learning Objectives:

Architecture design opportunities and building tall with mass timber in face of climate changes. Benefits of building with wood as carbon sink, engineering challenges and opportunities as scales.
Direct Design to Manufacturing processes, collaboration techniques, CAD to CAM and BIM workflows enabled by advanced design and fabrication techniques.
Building double curvature with wood, the use of technology in design process to develop a curved Nail Laminated Timber (NLT) prototype, challenges and optimization.
The process of using VR and gaming engines in the design process to evaluate design ideas, and the associated technology platforms.
x

What is Mass Timber?

George Berghorn explains the materials and processes of the new cutting edge building material

A Mass Timber Case Study: The Earth Systems Science Building, UBC -- (Part 4 of 5)



The University of British Columbia's Earth Sciences Building has an extensive and innovative use of cross laminated timber. The facility has two five-storey wings connected by an atrium, and provides modern learning spaces for earth sciences students and leading-edge laboratories for researchers.

A five-storey cantilevered staircase in the atrium built entirely of solid timber is the first of its kind in the world. Being column free, the staircase is a captivating work of art. The building has a hybrid floor system of wood and concrete that is lighter than solid concrete and provides excellent sound absorption.

To learn more, visit

Engineered Timber

Engineered Glulam Trusses services provided by Western Wood Structures.

Designing a Mass Timber Building

Scott Barton-Smith of HACKER Architects explains the process of designing and building a large commercial st

Why I Chose Earth and Environmental Sciences

Welcome!
The Faculty of Science Representatives made a short video on why our students chose Earth and Environmental Sciences at McMaster. Our hope is to give prospective first years some insight into this program. Enjoy!

What You Need to Know Now About Mass Timber Design

Mass timber design is growing as a safe and an environmentally responsible design solution. Here are 10 things you need to know about this building process, and 10 resources to help you learn more.

Here is a list of all references, in order of appearance:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
x

Future of Mid-Rise and Mass Timber Wood Construction in B.C. (Part 5 of 5)



Advancements in wood technology, systems and products, together with performance-based building codes have fueled interest in building with mass timber in mid-rise construction and even taller buildings.

Developments in both wood frame and mass timber are bringing mid-rise wood buildings to a new level of affordability and transforming our understanding of what is possible with wood construction.

Wood also plays a key role in reducing a project's environmental footprint. Wood products have less embodied energy, are responsible for lower air and water pollution, and have a lighter carbon footprint than other commonly used building materials.

To learn more, visit

Welcome to the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Welcome to the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Versatility of Mass Timber in Higher Education for Learning and Living

The 2018 International Mass Timber Conference was produced by Forest Business Network and WoodWorks.



Video Sponsors Include: Forest Business Network, Katerra, Think Wood, and Oregon Forest Resources Institute

Versatility of Mass Timber in Higher Education for Learning and Living — Tom Chung, Principal, Leers Weinzapfel Associates

Education is a fundamental cornerstone of our society. As our higher education has evolved in the 20th century, buildings that form our universities have taken shape with advancements in architecture and engineering in steel, concrete, and glass structures. But 21st century advancements in timber engineering provide great potential for higher education to be shaped by mass timber buildings in this century. New trends in education emphasizing collaborative and active learning are shaping the inter-disciplinary mode of learning that blur the traditional departmental boundaries. Furthermore, learning and living on universities are being integrated, as academic buildings take on social aspects associated with living, and student residences take on academic elements associated with learning. Leers Weinzapfel Associates have designed the first of these two fundamental university building types — academic classroom building and the student housing residence — in the USA using mass timber. The University of Massachusetts Amherst design building, a 4-story, 87,000 square-foot academic classroom building in Amherst, Mass. completed in early 2017, and stadium drive housing complex at the University of Arkansas, a 700-bed, 200,000 square-feet student residence under construction, are presented in a case-study that examines the unique aspects of designing these two fundamental higher education building types with extensive amounts of exposed mass timber structure. The versatility, aesthetic appeal, code and cost, and design benefits of mass timber construction will be discussed, as will reasons that the use of mass timber is gaining momentum on university campuses across the U.S.

Bachelor of Science in Wood Products Processing at UBC Faculty of Forestry

If you are innovative, like engineering and problem solving, the Bachelor of Science in Wood Products Processing is ideal for you. This award-winning program is a fusion of science, engineering and business. Students gain a comprehensive understanding of wood science, business and advanced manufacturing operations. They also develop essential transferable skills such as problem solving, communication, leadership and teamwork. Students can choose to complement their science degree with a Minor in Commerce.

Co-op is another exciting option that integrates career-related experience into their academic studies. The program was developed in direct response to the demand for university graduates qualified to become the leaders of tomorrow in the wood products sector. The extensive facilities of the Centre for Advanced Wood Processing—Canada’s national centre of excellence for wood products—support the delivery of this unique program by UBC’s Department of Wood Science. Proud Winner of the Yves Landry Foundation Award for the Most Innovative Manufacturing Technology Program at the University Level and the Alfred Scow Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Student Experience and Learning Environment at the University of British Columbia.

Learn more:

Complex Structures: Solutions in Wood



Innovative new technologies and building systems have enabled longer wood spans, taller walls and higher buildings, contributing to a wider range of wood construction system solutions and building opportunities.

Martin Antemann reviews the technical elements of how a 7-storey timber building in downtown Zurich was constructed with glulam and provides project details. The benefits of pre-fabrication is showcased through this building as the speed of erection was timely and cost-effective.

To see details on this topic presented at the 2013 Large Wood Structures Symposium in Vancouver, B.C., visit Wood WORKS! British Columbia --
x

Brock Commons Tallwood House - Chapter 3: Construction Process

Construction of the mass timber structure at the University of British Columbia’s Brock Commons Tallwood House took about nine weeks —two month ahead of schedule.

The average speed of the mass timber erection and envelope installation was two floors per week. This included the columns and CLT panels, encapsulation of the wood components with gypsum board, the pouring of a concrete topping, and installation of the envelope panels.

Having an integrated design team at the beginning of the project, as well as maximizing prefabricated wood components led to less traffic, reduced waste and a quieter, smaller site.

Learn more about the design process in Chapter 2:

For more information on Brock Commons Tallwood House visit

Wood Construction: Educational Institutions

naturallywood.com

People spend as much as 90 per cent of their time inside buildings, and for children, adolescents and an increasing number of young adults, most of this time is spent either at home or in school.

Wood construction can be used in many types of buildings, from single-family homes to multi-story and mid-rise condominiums and offices, schools, health facilities, recreational centers and public gathering areas. This video features three educational facilities that have chosen to incorporate wood into the structure:

Samuel Brighouse Elementary School
King David High School
The University of British Columbia's Sauder School of Business

To learn more about wood innovation and educational facilities, visit

Introduction to Brock Commons - UBC Tall Wood Building



Brock Commons Tallwood House is an 18-storey mass timber hybrid residence at the University of British Columbia (UBC). The building is comprised of 17 storeys of mass timber construction above a concrete podium and two concrete stair cores. The floor structure will consist of 5-ply cross laminated timber (CLT) panels supported on glue laminated timber (glulam) columns. The roof will be made of prefabricated sections of steel beams and metal decking.

Brock Commons will have capacity for just over 400 students with floorplans ranging from single bed studios to 4-bed accommodations. Study and social spaces will be located on the ground floor with a student lounge on the 18th floor, where the wood structure will be left exposed for demonstration and educational purposes.

Wood, a renewable material, was chosen in part to reflect the university’s commitment to sustainability. The building was also designed to meet LEED Gold certification.

The estimated avoided and sequestered greenhouse gases from the wood used in the building is equivalent to removing 511 cars off the road for a year. The total carbon dioxide equivalent avoided by using wood products over other materials in the building is more than 2,432 metric tonnes. Learn more about tall wood buildings at

***Estimated by the Wood Carbon Calculator for Buildings, based on research by Sathre, R. and J. O’Connor, 2010, A Synthesis of Research on Wood Products and Greenhouse Gas Impacts, FPInnovations (this relates to carbon stored and avoided GHG).
***CO2 refers to CO2 equivalent.

Expanding an existing building with mass timber – The Green House, London

How to turn a derelict 1960s concrete office block into a CO² storing green building and extend it by 50,000 ft² in Central London in just 8 weeks? With the sustainable material CLT, Cross Laminated Timber, this is possible. As a leading expert on wooden solutions for innovative construction, Stora Enso delivered the material, and B&K structures were responsible for efficient delivery and logistics. Especially in densely populated areas, with massive wood solutions a number of new storeys can be added to existing buildings.

Hybrid wooden skyscraper planned for Canada

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact tips@nextanimation.com.tw. Visit to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.


RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
Architecture firm Perkins and Will announced plans in May 2019 to build the tallest hybrid wooden skyscraper in the world in Vancouver.


The building will be called Canada Earth Tower and is expected to be built in the city's Central Broadway Corridor in collaboration with private developer Delta Land Development, which has yet to submit a formal rezoning application.


Bruce Langereis, president of Delta Land Development, told online newspaper the Daily Hive that the building's exterior, structural columns and floor plates would be made out of cross-laminated timber, a material that can be manufactured with a fire-resistance of 30, 60 and 90 minutes, according to industry site GreenSpec.


The building would also include a concrete core with an elevator and an emergency staircase.


The skyscraper could rise up to 40 stories high and include approximately 200 residential apartments in a 339,300 square feet space, according to ArchDaily. Sections of the tower would also include an outdoor garden for residents.


A horse-shaped complex would lie at the bottom of the building. Developers plan to transform the space into a place for retail stores, restaurants and offices.


The building would include other green designs such as energy-efficient air and water pumps, natural ventilation and insulated roofs, the Daily Hive reports.


RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Canada Earth Tower
2. Skyscraper's exterior, elevator and emergency staircase
3. Building's height and footprint
4. Horse-shaped complex at the bottom of the tower


VOICEOVER (in English):
Architecture firm Perkins and Will announced plans in May 2019 to build the tallest hybrid wooden skyscraper in the world in Vancouver.


Called Canada Earth Tower, the building is expected to be built in the city's Central Broadway Corridor in collaboration with private developer Delta Land Development, which has yet to submit a formal rezoning application.


Bruce Langereis, president of Delta Land Development, told online newspaper the Daily Hive that the building's exterior, structural columns and floor plates would be made out of cross-laminated timber, a material that can be manufactured with a fire-resistance of 30, 60 and 90 minutes, according to industry site GreenSpec.


The building would also include a concrete core with an elevator and an emergency staircase.


According to ArchDaily, the skyscraper could rise up to 40 stories high and include approximately 200 residential apartments in a 339,300 square feet space.


Sections of the tower would also include an outdoor garden for residents.


A horse-shaped complex would lie at the bottom of the building. Developers plan to transform the space into a place for retail stores, restaurants and offices.


SOURCES: ArchDaily, Archinect, Daily Hive, DesignBoom, GreenSpec








***
----------------------------------------­­---------------------------------------­-­----------------

Next Animation Studio’s News Direct service provides daily, high-quality, informative 3D news animations that fill in for missing footage and help viewers understand breaking news stories or in-depth features on science, technology, and health.

Sign up for a free trial of News Direct's news animations at

To subscribe to News Direct or for more info, please visit:

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu