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AFTER THE DEVASTATING WORLD WAR II, 1945-1947

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50 RARE Historical Photos YOU HAVE TO SEE (VOL. 59)

50 Best of Old Pics Archive (Vol. 59):

1. Bobbi Gibb, first woman to run the Boston Marathon in 1966, women were not allowed into the race.

2. Actress Lauren Bacall at the Gotham Hotel, New York, May 1945.

3. Three kittens in nightclothes, gathered around candlestick, 1914.

4. A 5MB hard drive being loaded onto a PanAm plane, 1956.

5. Natalie Wood At A Dance Rehearsal For “West Side Story”, 1960.

6. Pablo Escobar serving the Colombian Liberal Party, at Colombia’s House of Representatives, 1982.

7. Elton John dressed as Donald Duck, Central Park, 1980.

8. A girl naps on top of her car, while trying to reach the music festival at Woodstock, N.Y., Aug. 16, 1969.

9. Bob Dylan, producer Bob Johnston & Johnny Cash, Nashville, 1969.

10. Bill Clinton and Hillary Rodham playing volleyball in 1971.

11. Carnaby Street, London, 1966.

12. Iggy Pop & The Stooges, London, 1972.

13. Ursula Andress with Sean Connery: Dr. No is a 1962 British spy film, starring Sean Connery, with Ursula Andress and Joseph Wiseman, filmed in Jamaica and England.

14. Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany's, 1961.

15. Al Pacino, Marlon Brando, The Godfather: Part II, 1974.

16. Japanese accept unconditional surrender, August 14, 1945.

17. Brigitte Bardot, Paris, 1958.

18. Diana Ross: Leading Lady Medley from “G.I.T. on Broadway”, 1969.

19. First hair dryer, 1920.

20. Ella Fitzgerald after being arrested for shooting dice 1955.

21. German children play with stacks of worthless paper money, 1923.

22. Tina Turner onstage, 1969.

23. James Dean and his “Little Bastard” Silver Porsche 550 Spyder. just hours before the fatal crash in 1955.

24. Michael Jackson and Freddie Mercury backstage at The Los Angeles Forum, 1980.

25. Johnny Cash and Johnny Horton fishing in Louisiana, 1959.

26. Fifth Avenue After a Snow Storm, New York City, 1905.

27. American film actress Veronica Lake illustrates what can happen to women war workers when they don’t wear their hair back while working at factories, 1943.

28. Jessie Tarbox Beals, pioneer photographer working at the 1904 Worlds Fair.

29. Mermaid on display, 1950’s.

30. A woman inside an “electric bath” at the Light Care Institute, London, 1900.

31. Hanging a Confederate war criminal in front of the US Capitol Building in 1865.

32. In 1906, the Ringling Brothers bought the Barnum & Bailey Circus, merged it with their own popular circus, and ran the business successfully into the 1920's.

33. The first rocket launch from Cape Canaveral in 1950.

34. A teenage girl poses for a photograph in her Elvis Presley themed bedroom, 1950's.

35. Capturing the atomic blast of wasp prime test, Nevada , 18 February 1955.

36. Garden of the Gods, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1950's.

37. Notre-Dame, Paris, 1952.

38. USA, Coloreddrinking fountain from mid-20th century with african-american drinking.

39. Palette de Frida Kahlo, Mexique, 1952.

40. Matisse created The Snail, he was 83 years old and confined to his bed (1952-1953).

41. The scene at a Ku Klux Klan initiation ritual in Georgia, May 1946.

42. Zippo car, Chrysler, 1947.

43. In Britain, Vegatables were grown in every available piece of ground during WW2 including the moat at the Tower of London.

44. A view of Liberty Island in the early 1930s, when it was called Bedloe's Island.

45. House built into a large Redwood tree, California, 1930's.

46. View of the Golden Gate Bridge under construction, 1937.

47. Working girl outside of a traveling Peepshow, 1924.

48. Rio De Janeiro in the 1960's.

49. The staff of the Heilongjiang Daily, a Chinese Newspaper, accuse an official of ‘following the capitalist line’ during the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976).

50. Woodstock, 1969.
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42 STUNNING RESTORED AND COLORIZED HISTORICAL IMAGES BRING THE PAST TO LIFE!

Relating to the past can be difficult when all you have to look at are faded black and white photos that feel like they are from another planet. The mind thinks and remembers in color, meaning a color photograph is much easier to connect with than a black and white photo.

Thanks to film colorization historic photos restored to full color bring new life to history. Film colorization is a process that can be conducted digitally or by hand. Prior to the 1970s basic colorization was possible but required carefully painting color onto film stock.

The invention of the computer has completely altered the way we restore historic photos thanks to digital colorization. While the process is still time-consuming it is very much worth the hard work.

Research is conducted to match colors as closely to how they really looked as possible, but in some cases artists must guess which colors to use.


colorized, event & history, life & culture, people, photography
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Final Victory In The Pacific (WW2HRT_34-01)

Authors D.M. Giangreco (Hell To Pay), and David Dean Barrett (140 Days To Hiroshima) discuss the ultimate defeat of The Japanese Empire at The Minnesota World War 2 Roundtable.
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British spies: Eileen Burgoyne dies at 99, may have been Cold War spy, firearms discovered-TomoNews

TWICKENHAM, SURREY, UNITED KINGDOM — A shy old woman, who passed away in the suburbs, is now believed to be have been hiding an amazing secret, her life as a Cold War spy.

Reclusive, shy Eileen Burgoyne passed away last year without much notice by neighbors, but a team of builders discovered several firearms in her home after her death. One of the firearms was a working Sten sub-machine gun, an austere British 9mm weapon used throughout the Second World War.

Eileen had studied French and Spanish at college in Manchester and may have worked as a typist or translator for intelligence services.

Much of her personal file was destroyed, but what was left revealed she had two periods of service from 1945-1947 and 1950-1953. Eileen was posted overseas for the Combined Services Detailed Interrogation Centre, which operated interrogation centers around the world.

Her cousin Georgina Wood has shared some of the belongings she was sent following Eileen’s death. Some of the items hint at Eileen having been a spy for the United Kingdom.

Among the belongings were letters and telegrams from the War Office, photos of Hamburg devastated by Allied bombs, an invitation to a German hotel from a lieutenant colonel from 1945, and freedom passes from the Danish Allied Committee.

The discovery of the firearms in Eileen’s home sparked a brief bomb scare which definitely attracted the attention of neighbors as well as the media.

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Expulsion of Germans from Poland after World War II | Wikipedia audio article

This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:



00:05:11 1 Background
00:05:20 1.1 Historical background
00:07:41 1.2 Allied decisions: Tehran, Yalta and Potsdam conferences
00:11:18 1.3 Polish attitudes
00:14:48 2 Flight and evacuation following the Red Army's advance
00:19:47 3 Behind the frontline
00:20:35 3.1 Deportation to the Soviet Union
00:22:42 3.2 Internment and forced labor in Poland
00:26:23 3.3 Pre-Potsdam wild expulsions (May – July 1945)
00:28:58 4 Expulsions following the Potsdam Conference
00:33:16 5 Autochthons
00:35:42 5.1 Origin of the post-war population according to 1950 census
00:37:20 6 Rehabilitation of Volksdeutsche
00:38:35 7 Indispensable Germans
00:40:00 8 Repopulation
00:42:30 9 Formal end of the expulsions
00:43:53 10 Demographic estimates
00:47:06 11 Legacy
00:47:15 11.1 Post-war
00:48:33 11.2 Post-communist (1989–present)
00:51:14 12 See also
00:51:51 13 Notes
00:51:59 14 Sources



Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago.

Learning by listening is a great way to:
- increases imagination and understanding
- improves your listening skills
- improves your own spoken accent
- learn while on the move
- reduce eye strain

Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone.

Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio:

Other Wikipedia audio articles at:

Upload your own Wikipedia articles through:

Speaking Rate: 0.8156029009477301
Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B


I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.
- Socrates


SUMMARY
=======
The flight and expulsion of Germans from Poland was the largest of a series of flights and expulsions of Germans in Europe during and after World War II. The German population fled or was expelled from all regions which are currently within the territorial boundaries of Poland, including the former eastern territories of Germany and parts of pre-war Poland.
During World War II, expulsions were initiated by Nazi Germany in occupied Poland. The Germans deported 2.478 million Polish citizens from the Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany, murdered another 5.38–5.58 million Poles and Polish Jews and resettled 1.3 million ethnic Germans in their place.
Around 500,000 Germans were stationed in Poland as part of its occupation force; these consisted of people such as clerks, technicians and support staff.The German population east of Oder-Neisse was estimated at over 11 million in early 1945. The first mass flight of Germans followed the Red Army's advance and was composed of both spontaneous flight driven by rumours of Soviet atrocities, and organised evacuation starting in the summer of 1944 and continuing through to the spring of 1945. Overall about 1% (100,000) of the German civilian population east of the Oder–Neisse line perished in the fighting prior to the surrender in May 1945. In 1945, the eastern territories of Germany as well as Polish areas annexed by Germany were occupied by the Soviet Red Army and Polish Communist military forces. German civilians were also sent as reparations labor to the USSR. The Soviet Union transferred former German territories in the east of the Oder–Neisse line to Poland in July 1945. In mid-1945, 4.5 to 4.6 million Germans remained on the territories under Polish control. Early expulsions in Poland were undertaken by the Polish Communist military authorities even before the Potsdam Conference (wild expulsions), to ensure the later integration into an ethnically homogeneous Poland as envisioned by the Polish Communists. Between seven hundred and eight hundred thousand Germans were affected. By early 1946, 932,000 had been verified as having Polish nationality. In the February 1946 census, 2,288,000 persons were listed as Germans and 417,400 became subject to verification aiming at the establishment of nationality. From the spring of 1946 the expulsions gradually became better organised, affecting the remaining German population. By 1950, 3,155,000 German civilians had been expelled and 1,043,550 were naturalised as Polish citizens. Germans considered indispensable for the Polish economy were retained; virtually all had left by 1960. Some 500,000 Germans in Poland, East Prussia, and Silesia were employed as forced labor in communist-administered camps prior to being expelled from Poland. Besides large ca ...

Flight and expulsion of Germans from Poland during and after World War II | Wikipedia audio article

This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:



00:05:24 1 Background
00:05:34 1.1 Historical background
00:08:01 1.2 Allied decisions: Tehran, Yalta and Potsdam conferences
00:11:47 1.3 Polish attitudes
00:15:27 2 Flight and evacuation following the Red Army's advance
00:20:42 3 Behind the frontline
00:21:33 3.1 Deportation to the Soviet Union
00:23:43 3.2 Internment and forced labor in Poland
00:27:36 3.3 Pre-Potsdam wild expulsions (May – July 1945)
00:30:19 4 Expulsions following the Potsdam Conference
00:34:48 5 Autochthons
00:37:23 6 Rehabilitation of Volksdeutsche
00:38:43 7 Indispensable Germans
00:40:12 8 Repopulation
00:42:50 9 Formal end of the expulsions
00:44:16 10 Demographic estimates
00:47:40 11 Legacy
00:47:49 11.1 Post-war
00:49:11 11.2 Post-communist (1989–present)
00:52:01 12 See also
00:52:38 13 Notes
00:52:48 14 Sources



Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago.

Learning by listening is a great way to:
- increases imagination and understanding
- improves your listening skills
- improves your own spoken accent
- learn while on the move
- reduce eye strain

Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone.

Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio:

Other Wikipedia audio articles at:

Upload your own Wikipedia articles through:

Speaking Rate: 0.912272003525012
Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F


I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.
- Socrates


SUMMARY
=======
The flight and expulsion of Germans from Poland was the largest of a series of flights and expulsions of Germans in Europe during and after World War II. The German population fled or was expelled from all regions which are currently within the territorial boundaries of Poland, including the former eastern territories of Germany and parts of pre-war Poland.
During World War II, expulsions were initiated by Nazi Germany in occupied Poland. The Germans deported 2.478 million Polish citizens from the Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany, murdered another 5.38–5.58 million Poles and Polish Jews and resettled 1.3 million ethnic Germans in their place.
Around 500,000 Germans were stationed in Poland as part of its occupation force; these consisted of people such as clerks, technicians and support staff.The German population east of Oder-Neisse was estimated at over 11 million in early 1945. The first mass flight of Germans followed the Red Army's advance and was composed of both spontaneous flight driven by rumours of Soviet atrocities, and organised evacuation starting in the summer of 1944 and continuing through to the spring of 1945. Overall about 1% (100,000) of the German civilian population east of the Oder–Neisse line perished in the fighting prior to the surrender in May 1945. In 1945, the eastern territories of Germany as well as Polish areas annexed by Germany were occupied by the Soviet Red Army and Polish Communist military forces. German civilians were also sent as reparations labor to the USSR. The Soviet Union transferred former German territories in the east of the Oder–Neisse line to Poland in July 1945. In mid-1945, 4.5 to 4.6 million Germans remained on the territories under Polish control. Early expulsions in Poland were undertaken by the Polish Communist military authorities even before the Potsdam Conference (wild expulsions), to ensure the later integration into an ethnically homogeneous Poland as envisioned by the Polish Communists. Between seven hundred and eight hundred thousand Germans were affected. By early 1946, 932,000 had been verified as having Polish nationality. In the February 1946 census, 2,288,000 persons were listed as Germans and 417,400 became subject to verification aiming at the establishment of nationality. From the spring of 1946 the expulsions gradually became better organised, affecting the remaining German population. By 1950, 3,155,000 German civilians had been expelled and 1,043,550 were naturalised as Polish citizens. Germans considered indispensable for the Polish economy were retained; virtually all had left by 1960. Some 500,000 Germans in Poland, East Prussia, and Silesia were employed as forced labor in communist-administered camps prior to being expelled from Poland. Besides large camps, some of which were re-used German concentration camps, numerous othe ...

Flight and expulsion of Germans from Poland after World War II | Wikipedia audio article

This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:



00:05:17 1 Background
00:05:26 1.1 Historical background
00:07:51 1.2 Allied decisions: Tehran, Yalta and Potsdam conferences
00:11:33 1.3 Polish attitudes
00:15:07 2 Flight and evacuation following the Red Army's advance
00:20:14 3 Behind the frontline
00:21:03 3.1 Deportation to the Soviet Union
00:23:12 3.2 Internment and forced labor in Poland
00:26:58 3.3 Pre-Potsdam wild expulsions (May – July 1945)
00:29:37 4 Expulsions following the Potsdam Conference
00:34:02 5 Autochthons
00:36:32 6 Rehabilitation of Volksdeutsche
00:37:50 7 Indispensable Germans
00:39:16 8 Repopulation
00:41:50 9 Formal end of the expulsions
00:43:14 10 Demographic estimates
00:46:33 11 Legacy
00:46:42 11.1 Post-war
00:48:01 11.2 Post-communist (1989–present)
00:50:45 12 See also
00:51:23 13 Notes
00:51:32 14 Sources



Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago.

Learning by listening is a great way to:
- increases imagination and understanding
- improves your listening skills
- improves your own spoken accent
- learn while on the move
- reduce eye strain

Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone.

Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio:

Other Wikipedia audio articles at:

Upload your own Wikipedia articles through:

Speaking Rate: 0.7940946584623712
Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B


I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.
- Socrates


SUMMARY
=======
The flight and expulsion of Germans from Poland was the largest of a series of flights and expulsions of Germans in Europe during and after World War II. The German population fled or was expelled from all regions which are currently within the territorial boundaries of Poland, including the former eastern territories of Germany and parts of pre-war Poland.
During World War II, expulsions were initiated by Nazi Germany in occupied Poland. The Germans deported 2.478 million Polish citizens from the Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany, murdered another 5.38–5.58 million Poles and Polish Jews and resettled 1.3 million ethnic Germans in their place.
Around 500,000 Germans were stationed in Poland as part of its occupation force; these consisted of people such as clerks, technicians and support staff.The German population east of Oder-Neisse was estimated at over 11 million in early 1945. The first mass flight of Germans followed the Red Army's advance and was composed of both spontaneous flight driven by rumours of Soviet atrocities, and organised evacuation starting in the summer of 1944 and continuing through to the spring of 1945. Overall about 1% (100,000) of the German civilian population east of the Oder–Neisse line perished in the fighting prior to the surrender in May 1945. In 1945, the eastern territories of Germany as well as Polish areas annexed by Germany were occupied by the Soviet Red Army and Polish Communist military forces. German civilians were also sent as reparations labor to the USSR. The Soviet Union transferred former German territories in the east of the Oder–Neisse line to Poland in July 1945. In mid-1945, 4.5 to 4.6 million Germans remained on the territories under Polish control. Early expulsions in Poland were undertaken by the Polish Communist military authorities even before the Potsdam Conference (wild expulsions), to ensure the later integration into an ethnically homogeneous Poland as envisioned by the Polish Communists. Between seven hundred and eight hundred thousand Germans were affected. By early 1946, 932,000 had been verified as having Polish nationality. In the February 1946 census, 2,288,000 persons were listed as Germans and 417,400 became subject to verification aiming at the establishment of nationality. From the spring of 1946 the expulsions gradually became better organised, affecting the remaining German population. By 1950, 3,155,000 German civilians had been expelled and 1,043,550 were naturalised as Polish citizens. Germans considered indispensable for the Polish economy were retained; virtually all had left by 1960. Some 500,000 Germans in Poland, East Prussia, and Silesia were employed as forced labor in communist-administered camps prior to being expelled from Poland. Besides large camps, some of which were re-used German concentration camps, numerous oth ...

37 GREAT RARE CELEBRITY PHOTOS YOU REALLY SHOULD SEE

Rare Celebrity Photos You May Have Never Seen Until Now
It’s hard to escape pics of famous people. They’re everywhere –the internet, fanzines, supermarket tabloids, reality tv show. But here’s a batch of rare celebrity photos that might take you by surprise. What I love about these dynamic photographs give us a glimpse of the lighter, more human side of the celebrity that we don’t often get to see. So scroll on down and take a look. I think you’ll enjoy them, too.

1963 USA TOUR OF AN AMERICAN COUPLE

Here below is a wonderful photo collection from John F. Ciesla that shows his 1963 USA tour with his close friend named Bill.

“Travels with Bill.

USA trip, April through June 1963.

Close friend, William J. Armstrong passed away in March of 2013 at the age of 80. I came in possession of his many travel slides which he had taken through the years, and felt it would be an honor to share these many fine photos for all to see. One of Bill’s many interests was in transportation, and included almost all forms, from the streetcar, to the Jet plane. Early on, he could be found with a simple box camera taking photos of 3rd Avenue Railway streetcars in his native Bronx and nearby southern Westchester County. As he matured, the circle of travel increased to all of the New York metropolitan area, and then to other cities. Bill loved to travel, to see and experience not only his native New York, but the country as well. His interests went far beyond just transportation, but included history, geography, geology, and photography.

EVERYDAY LIFE OF MEXICO IN 1902

This set contains samples from the SMU CUL Digital Collections digital collection from Southern Methodist University's Central University Libraries (CUL).

A country of great beauty and geographical diversity, Mexico has attracted a variety of local photographers and those from abroad. These photographs portray Mexican people from all walks of life, culture, and history in 1902.

Subjects include landscapes, native peoples, railroads, mining, agriculture, tourist views, and more.

1900s, life & culture, Mexico, people
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PORTRAITS OF MUSICIANS POSING WITH THEIR YOUNGER SELVES

Ever wished you could travel back in time and meet your younger self?

Dutch artist Ard Gelinck has been working on an ongoing Then & Now project in which he uses Photoshop to create portraits of famous people posing with their younger selves. Among these stars are Freddie Mercury, David Bowie, Elton John, Rob Lowe, Madonna, Lady Gaga, Phil Collins, and just to name a few.

His images are often quite convincing since he takes the time to find very good source photos where it appears to be credible that they are posing with each other. He then takes time to carefully match the colors and tones creating the illusion of a portrait actually taken together.

In some cases, decades have passed since the original photos, the comparisons are something really special. Take a look at the images below!

1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, celebrity & famous people, humor & hilarious, portraits, Then and Now

KATHARINE HEPBURN & SPENCER TRACY

Of all the legendary Hollywood’s love stories and affairs, perhaps the most complicated is Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn’s. Though carefully concealed from the public, on screen the iconic duo shared their time on total nine different films, starting with the 1942 classic “Woman of the Year” and coming to an end with the ever indelible “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” in 1967.

Tracy and Hepburn first met on the set of “Woman of the Year,” when he was 41 and she was 34. Their initial impressions were similar to a screwball comedy, with Hepburn’s first words to Tracy were “I fear I may be too tall for you, Mr. Tracy,” and his being wary of her, even suspecting that she was a lesbian. At the beginning, the pair addressed each other as “Miss Hepburn” and “Mr. Tracy,” but within a week after they changed to first-name terms. Gene Kelly, a co-star on the film, once recalled, “At lunch time they’d just meet and sit on a bench on the lot. They’d hold hands and talk – and everybody left them alone in their little private world.”

Their relationship, however, was kept in secret, with Tracy determined to conceal the affair from his wife, even as M.G.M was to prevent a controversy; needless to say, it still remained an open secret in Hollywood at the time. They were extremely careful to avoid being seen together in public and maintained separate residences, though Tracy did settle into a cottage near Hepburn’s house in Beverly Hills. Throughout the pair’s 26-year-long romance, Tracy remained married and Hepburn never fought for marriage. According to Joan Fontaine, he could “get a divorce whenever I want to, but my wife and Kate like things just as they are.”

1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1980s, celebrity & famous people, dating & love, movies

EIFFEL TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION, 1887-1889

In 1889, Paris hosted an Exposition Universelle (World’s Fair) to mark the 100-year anniversary of the French Revolution. More than 100 artists submitted competing plans for a monument to be built on the Champ-de-Mars, located in central Paris, and serve as the exposition’s entrance. The commission was granted to Eiffel et Compagnie, a consulting and construction firm owned by the acclaimed bridge builder, architect and metals expert Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel. While Eiffel himself often receives full credit for the monument that bears his name, it was one of his employees—a structural engineer named Maurice Koechlin—who came up with and fine-tuned the concept.
The assembly of the supports began on July 1, 1887 and was completed twenty-two months later. All the elements were prepared in Eiffel’s factory located at Levallois-Perret on the outskirts of Paris. Each of the 18,000 pieces used to construct the Tower were specifically designed and calculated, traced out to an accuracy of a tenth of a millimeter and then put together forming new pieces around five meters each. A team of constructors, who had worked on the great metal viaduct projects, were responsible for the 150 to 300 workers on site assembling this gigantic erector set.

All the metal pieces of the tower are held together by rivets, a well-refined method of construction at the time the Tower was constructed. First the pieces were assembled in the factory using bolts, later to be replaced one by one with thermally assembled rivets, which contracted during cooling thus ensuring a very tight fit. A team of four men was needed for each rivet assembled: one to heat it up, another to hold it in place, a third to shape the head and a fourth to beat it with a sledgehammer. Only a third of the 2,500,000 rivets used in the construction of the Tower were inserted directly on site.

SCOOTERS FROM THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY

The Autoped was an early motor scooter or motorized scooter manufactured by the Autoped Company of Long Island City, New York from 1915 to 1921.

The driver stood on a platform with 10-inch tires and operated the machine using only the handlebars and steering column, pushing them forward to engage the clutch, using a lever on the handlebar to control the throttle, and pulling the handlebars and column back to disengage the clutch and apply the brake.

After riding, the steering column would be folded onto the platform to store the scooter more easily. The engine was an air-cooled, 4-stroke, 155 cc engine over the front wheel. The bike came with a headlamp and tail lamp, a Klaxon horn, and a toolbox. Developed during wartime and gasoline rationing, it was quite efficient, but was not widely distributed. An electric version was also available with a motor on the front wheel.

A patent for the Autoped as a “self-propelled vehicle” was applied for in July 1913 and granted in July 1916. An early description of the Autoped described it as having a hollow steering column that acted as the fuel tank. However, the production version had a fuel tank above the front mudguard.

The Autoped went out of production in the United States in 1921, but was manufactured by Krupp in Germany from 1919 to 1922.

During the 1930s, scooters were introduced to a new market as the ideal mode of transport at large, sprawling military bases. Ironically, the era of the scooter truly began after the war — a direct result of fuel rationing.

(Photos: Getty Images, via Mashable)

1910s, 1920s, 1930s, bicycle & motorcycle, event & history, humor & hilarious, traffic & transport

BEAUTIFUL LIFE OF SWITZERLAND IN THE EARLY 1960S

Beautiful Life of Switzerland in the Early 1960s Through Found Kodachrome Slides:

A Kodachrome slide collection was found by Kevin Danks that shows beautiful life of Switzerland in May 1963.

“These Kodachrome slides came from eBay, the first large collection I bought. A group of British holidaymakers on a coach trip to Switzerland. From the index card I got with these slides, I am certain the photographer and his wife are now dead (by the way, his wife was called Vi (Violet?) and he is anonymous).
It is sad that no one in the family wanted these, or that maybe they didn't know about them. Perhaps there wasn't anyone to inherit them. Whatever the reason, they are now safe with me and that has to be better than being in landfill somewhere.”



1960s, life & culture, people, Switzerland, travel
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Daniel Kurtz-Phelan - The China Mission

On November 19, 2020 Daniel Kurtz-Phelan joined the MacArthur Memorial for a discussion of his book The China Mission: George Marshall's Unfinished War, 1945-1947.

BEAUTIFUL LIFE OF THE MIDWEST IN THE EARLY 1910S [40 PHOTOS]

40 Amazing Pics Show Beautiful Life of the Midwest in the Early 1910s:

An amazing collection of antique glass plate negatives was found by William Creswell that shows beautiful life of the Midwest around 1913.

“Most of these supposedly date from around 1913 and originate in the Midwest. I believe they are actually a little older. At least one clue places these images in the Minneapolis, Minnesota area.”

1910s, life & culture, people

EVERYDAY LIFE OF ITALY IN THE MID-19TH CENTURY (30 PHOTOS)

30 Amazing Pics Capture Everyday Life of Italy in the Mid-19th Century:

Born 1834 in Frankfurt am Main, German photographer Giorgio Sommer became one of Europe's most important and prolific photographers of the 19th century. Active from 1857 to 1888, he produced thousands of images of archeological ruins, landscapes, art objects and portraits.

After studying business in Frankfurt, Sommer opened his first photography studio in Switzerland, where he made relief images of mountains for the Swiss government. In 1856, moved his business to Naples and later (1866) formed a partnership with fellow German photographer Edmund Behles who owned a studio in Rome. Operating from their respective Naples and Rome studios, Sommer and Behles became one of the largest and most prolific photography concerns in Italy.

Sommer and Behles exhibited extensively and earned numerous honors and prizes for their work (London 1862, Paris 1867, Vienna 1873, Nuremberg 1885). At one time, Sommer was appointed official photographer to King Victor Emmanuel II of Italy.

Sommer was involved in every aspect of the photography business. He published his own images that he sold in his studios and to customers across Europe. In later years, he photographed custom images for book illustrations, as well as printing his own albums and postcards.

In Naples, Sommer opened a total of four additional studios: at No. 4 and No. 8 Monte di Dio, No. 5 Magazzino S. Caterina, and a last at Piazza della Vittoria.

Sommer died in Naples in 1914 at the age of 79.

These amazing photographs are part of Sommer's work that he captured everyday life of Italy from the 1860s and 1880s.

1800s, Italy, life & culture, people

The Legacy of your Photography (feat. Dennis Field)

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In this video I sit down with my Grandfather, Dennis Field, as he talks through his photo albums from his years in the Royal Navy, from 1945-1947. He traded a box of player cigarettes for a box brownie camera in Hong Kong in late 1945 and proceeded to take photos of his two years of service. On top of listening to some of his stories, and seeing his images, I also offer some thoughts on how this has challenged me to look at my work beyond today, and start to think about how my images might tell stories to future generations, showing what life was like in my day and time.

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#photography #history #storytelling

12 WW2b & Cold War

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