This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

After watching this, your brain will not be the same | Lara Boyd | TEDxVancouver

x

After watching this, your brain will not be the same | Lara Boyd | TEDxVancouver

In a classic research-based TEDx Talk, Dr. Lara Boyd describes how neuroplasticity gives you the power to shape the brain you want. Recorded at TEDxVancouver at Rogers Arena on November 14, 2015.

YouTube Tags: brain science, brain, stroke, neuroplasticity, science, motor learning, identity, TED, TEDxVancouver, TEDxVancouver 2015, Vancouver, TEDx, Rogers Arena, Vancouver speakers, Vancouver conference, ideas worth spreading, great idea,

Our knowledge of the brain is evolving at a breathtaking pace, and Dr. Lara Boyd is positioned at the cutting edge of these discoveries. In 2006, she was recruited by the University of British Columbia to become the Canada Research Chair in Neurobiology and Motor Learning. Since that time she has established the Brain Behaviour Lab, recruited and trained over 40 graduate students, published more than 80 papers and been awarded over $5 million in funding.

Dr. Boyd’s efforts are leading to the development of novel, and more effective, therapeutics for individuals with brain damage, but they are also shedding light on broader applications. By learning new concepts, taking advantage of opportunities, and participating in new activities, you are physically changing who you are, and opening up a world of endless possibility.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at
x

Your brain hallucinates your conscious reality | Anil Seth

Right now, billions of neurons in your brain are working together to generate a conscious experience -- and not just any conscious experience, your experience of the world around you and of yourself within it. How does this happen? According to neuroscientist Anil Seth, we're all hallucinating all the time; when we agree about our hallucinations, we call it reality. Join Seth for a delightfully disorienting talk that may leave you questioning the very nature of your existence.

Check out more TED talks:

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

Follow TED on Twitter:
Like TED on Facebook:

Subscribe to our channel:
x

Superhuman Brain - After watching this, your brain will not be the same Lara Boyd TEDxVancouver

x

After watching this your brain will not be the same Lara Boyd, Part 1

So how do we learn? And why do some of us learn things more easily than others? So, as I just mentioned, I’m Dr. Lara Boyd. I am a brain researcher here at the University of British Columbia. These are the questions that fascinate me.
So brain research is one of the great frontiers in the understanding of human physiology, and also in the consideration of what makes us who we are. It’s an amazing time to be a brain researcher and, I would argue to you that I have the most interesting job in the world.
What we know about the brain is changing at a breathtaking pace, and much of what we thought we knew and understood about the brain turns out to be not true, or incomplete. Now some of these misconceptions are more obvious than others. For example, we used to think that after childhood the brain did not, really could not change. And it turns out that nothing can be farther than the truth.
Another misconception about the brain is that you only use parts of it at any given time and silent when you do nothing. Well, this is also untrue. It turns out that even when you are at a rest, and thinking of nothing, your brain is highly active. So it’s advanced in technology, such as MRI, that’s allowed us to make these and many other important discoveries. And perhaps the most exciting, the most interesting and transformative of these discoveries is that every time you learn a new fact or skill, you change your brain. It’s something we call neuroplasticity.
x

After watching this, your brain will not be the same Lara Boyd TEDxVancouver online video cutter com

Your Plastic Brain - Lara Boyd Professor, Center for Brain Health

Silicon Valley Open Doors Conference.
Keynote: Lara Boyd, Professor, Center for Brain Health, Canada Research Chair in Neurobiology of Motor Learning; Director, Brain Behaviour Lab, The University of British Columbia
Topic: Your Plastic Brain

Dr Lara Boyd - Public Salon: - Educational Neuroplasticity

This is Dr. Lara Boyd's presentation at Sam Sullivan's 32nd Public Salon on November 14th, 2018 at the Vancouver Playhouse Theatre in Vancouver, BC.

Dr. Lara Boyd is a Neuroscientist and Physical Therapist at the University of British Columbia. She is a professor and has held a Canada Research Chair, a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Career Scientist award and been a Peter Wall Scholar. Dr. Boyd directs the Brain Behaviour Lab at the University of British Columbia. Her work is centered on answering the question of what limits, and what facilitates, stroke recovery. Dr. Boyd also serves as the Health Research Advisor to the Vice President for Research and is the university’s delegate to the Canadians Institutes of Health Research.

For more information on the Public Salon
Please press the 'Subscribe' button if you would like to see new presentations as they are released or be notified of upcoming Public Salons.

After watching this, your brain will not be the same Lara Boyd, Part 4

The net result of this is that stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in adults in the world. Individuals with stroke are younger and tend to live longer with that disability. And research from my group actually shows that the health-related quality of life of Canadians with stroke has declined.
So clearly we need to be better at helping people recover from a stroke. And this is an enormous societal problem, and it’s one that we are not solving. So what can be done? One thing is absolutely clear: the best driver of neuroplastic change in your brain is your behavior. The problem is that the dose of behavior, the dose of practice that’s required to learn new and relearn old motor skills, it’s very large. And how to effectively deliver these large doses of practice is a very difficult problem. It’s also a very expensive problem.
So the approach that my research has taken is to develop therapies that prime or that prepare the brain to learn. And these have included brain stimulation, exercise, and robotics. But through my research, I’ve realized that a major limitation to the development of therapies that speed recovery from stroke is that patterns of neuroplasticity are highly variable from person to person.

Now as a researcher, variability used to drive me crazy. It makes it very difficult to use statistics to test your data and your ideas. And because of this, medical intervention studies are specifically designed to minimize variability. But in my research, it’s becoming really clear that the most important, the most informative data that we collect, is showing this variability.
So by studying the brain after a stroke, we’ve learned a lot and I think these lessons are very valuable in other areas. So the first lesson is that the primary driver of change in your brain is your behavior, so there is no neuroplasticity drug you can take. Nothing is more effective than practice at helping you learn and the bottom line is you have to do the work.
And in fact, my research has shown that increased difficulty, increased struggle if you will, during practice actually leads to both more learning and greater structural change in the brain.
The problem here is, is that neuroplasticity can work both ways. It can be positive, you learn something new and you refine the motor skill. And it also can be negative though, you forgot something you once knew, you become addicted to drugs, maybe you have chronic pain. So your brain is tremendously plastic and it’s being shaped both structurally and functionally by everything you do, but also by everything that you don’t do.

After watching this, your brain will not be the same Lara Boyd Part 2

So as little as least 25 years ago we thought that after about puberty, the only changes that took place in the brain were negative. The loss of brain cells with aging, resulted in damage, like a stroke. And then studies began to show remarkable amounts of reorganization in the adult brain. And the ensuing research has shown us that all of our behaviors change our brain. That these changes are not limited by age, it’s good news, right? And in fact, they are taking place all the time. And very importantly, brain reorganization helps to support recovery after you damage your brain.
The key to each of these changes is neuroplasticity. So what does it look like? So your brain can change in three very basic ways to support learning. And the first is chemical. So the brain actually functions by transferring chemical signals between brain cells, what we call neurons, and this triggers a series of actions and reactions. So to support learning your brain can increase the amount of the concentrations of these chemical signaling that’s taking place between neurons. Now because this kind of change can happen rapidly, this supports short-term memory or short-term improvement in the performance of a motor skill.
The second way that the brain can change to support learning is by altering its structure. So during learning, the brain can change the connections between neurons. Now here the physical structure of the brain is actually changing so this takes a bit more time. These types of changes are related to long term memory, the long term improvement in motor skill.
Now, these processes interact and let me give you an example of how. So we’ve all tried to learn a new motor skill. Maybe playing the piano, maybe learning to juggle. You have had the experience of getting better and better within a single session of practice, and thinking “I have got it”.

And then maybe you return the next day and all those improvements from the day before they are lost. What happened? Well in the short term, your brain was able to increase the chemical signaling between your neurons. But for some reason, those changes did not induce the structural change that is necessary to support long term memory. Remember that long term memories take time. And what you see in the short term does not reflect learning. It’s these physical changes that are now going to support long term memories and chemical changes that support short term memories.
Structural changes also can lead to integrated networks of brain regions that function together to support learning. And it can also lead to certain brain regions that are important for very specific behaviors to change your structure or to enlarge. So here are some examples of that. So people who read braille have larger hand sensory areas in their brain than those of us who don’t. Your dominant hand motor region, which is on the left side of your brain, if you are right-handed, is larger than the other side. And research shows that London taxi cab drivers who actually have to memorize a map of London to get their taxicab license, they have larger brain regions devoted to spacial or mapping memories.

After watching this, your brain will not be the same, Lara Boyd Part 3

Now the last way that your brain can change to support learning is by altering its function. As you use a brain region it becomes more and more excitable and easy to use again. And as your brain has these areas that increase their excitability the brain shifts how and when they are activated. With learning, we see that whole networks of brain activity are shifting and changing.
So neuroplasticity is supported by chemical, by structural, and by functional changes. And these are happening across the whole brain. They can occur in isolation from one another, but most often they take place in the concert. Together they support learning. And they’re taking place all the time.
So I just told you really how awesomely neuroplastic your brain is. So why can’t you learn anything you choose to with ease?
Why do our kids sometimes fail in school? Why as we age do we tend to forget things? And why don’t people fully recover from brain damage? That is, what is it that limits and facilitates neuroplasticity?
And so this is what I study. I study specifically how it relates to recovery from stroke. So recently stroke dropped from being the third leading cause of death in the United States to be the fourth leading cause of death. Great news, right? But actually, it turns out that the number of people having a stroke has not declined. We are just better at keeping people alive after a severe stroke. It turns out to be very difficult to help the brain recover from the stroke. And frankly, we have failed to develop effective rehabilitation interventions.
x

After watching this, your brain will not be the same - BEST MOTIVATIONAL SPEECH 2020

#Motivation #GreatestMotivation #NeverGiveup #Motivationforsuccess

Never Give Up - The Greatest Motivational Video For success in 2020.


This is one of the most powerful motivational video in 2020.When I was creating this I wanted it to be for people who have
had a tough year, that feel defeated and want to give up.
Sometimes we don't even notice when our lives become tragic because
we are so used to it. I just want to say that we are here to support you.
If you Like this video then Don't Forget to Like and subscribe our video.

After watching this, your brain will not be the same Lara Boyd TEDxVancouver {6}

After watching this, your brain will not be the same Lara Boyd TEDxVancouver

SUBSCRIBE TO SEE MORE INTERESTING VIDEOS

After watching this, your brain will not be the same Lara Boyd, Part 5

The second lesson we’ve learned about the brain is that there is no one size fits all approach to learning. So there is no recipe for learning. Consider the popular belief that it takes 10,000 hours of practice to learn and to master a new motor skill. Now I can assure you it’s not quite that simple. For some of us, it’s going to take a lot more practice and for others, it may take far less. So the shaping of our plastic brains is it’s far too unique for there to be any single intervention that’s going to work for all of us.
And now this realization has forced us to consider something call personalized medicine. So this is the idea that to optimize outcomes each individual requires their own intervention. And the idea actually comes from cancer treatments. And here it turns out that genetics is very important in matching certain types of chemotherapy with specific forms of cancer.
My research is showing that this also applies to recovery from stroke. So there’re certain characteristics of brain structure and function we called biomarkers. And these biomarkers are proving to be very helpful and helping us to match specific therapies with individual patients. And the data for my lab suggests it’s a combination of biomarkers that best predicts neuroplastic change and patterns of recovery after stroke. And that’s not surprising given how complicated the human brain is.

#AJOBTHING After Watching This, Your Brain Will Not Be the Same - Lara Boyd

CLICK HERE :
Instagram:
Facebook:



Published by TED (

”There is no one size fits all approach to learning”.
x

You can grow new brain cells. Here's how | Sandrine Thuret

Can we, as adults, grow new neurons? Neuroscientist Sandrine Thuret says that we can, and she offers research and practical advice on how we can help our brains better perform neurogenesis—improving mood, increasing memory formation and preventing the decline associated with aging along the way.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at

Follow TED news on Twitter:
Like TED on Facebook:

Subscribe to our channel:

After watching this, your brain will not be the same

After watching this, your brain will not be the same because in this video I’m going to share you 3 tips on how to trick your brain to have a strong mindset to gain success.

[How to build the right habits]


[About “MotiveVideoBook”]
In this channel I provide motivational self-development tips inspired by Japanese books to the world. My mission is to make you stop living a life that is not chasing your own passion and dream. I believe everyone on this earth was born for a reason. I believe you have your own unique talent which you can serve and bring a huge impact to the world. You just need the right mindset and habit to awaken your incredible power and my passion is to encourage you to live that dream life or yours! Let's enjoy the exciting journey together.
Regards,
Joey

[Visit my homepage]


[Subscribe]


[Twitter]


[Music]
Audio jungle
It's A Beautiful Day (by ExtensionsMusic)

After watching this, your brain will not be the same

After watching this, your brain will not be the same

In this video we describe how neuroplasticity gives you the power to shape the brain you want.

Our knowledge of the brain is evolving at a breathtaking pace, and we are positioned at the cutting edge of these discoveries.
»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»
What do you think about the topic? Let me know down below!

Can I get 1000 likes and 10.000 subscribers?

»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»
▲ Related videos ▼
After watching this, you will not be the same - BEST MOTIVATIONAL SPEECH 2020


After watching this, your brain will not be the same | Lara Boyd | TEDxVancouver


Bright Side


Become Intelligent


Bright Side


Become A GENIUS While You Sleep! Genius Mindset Affirmations For Epic Mind And Brain Power!



»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»
#English #Science #Brain #Cognitive science

Tags:

»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»

RIGHT NOTICE: The Copyright Laws of the United States recognizes a “fair use” of copyrighted content. Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Act states:“Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.” This video and our youtube channel in general may contain certain copyrighted works that were not specifically authorized to be used by the copyright holder(s), but which we believe in good faith are protected by federal law and the fair use doctrine for one or more of the reasons noted above.

After watching this, your brain will not be the same | Lara Boyd | TEDx

How much do you know about intellectual disabilities? | Matthew Williams | TEDxVancouver

In a talk that garnered a tearful standing ovation, Matthew Williams demands equality and respect for individuals with intellectual disabilities, told from the perspective of a Special Olympics athlete. Recorded at TEDxVancouver at Rogers Arena on November 14, 2015.

Matthew Williams is a firm believer in the power of sport to transform lives. He experienced it firsthand when he joined Special Olympics in the eighth grade. Williams has achieved a great deal in his decade with Special Olympics. He competed in the 2015 Special Olympics World Summer Games in basketball, where the first-ever Canadian basketball team to participate in a World Games finished fourth. He has also participated in track and field, swimming, floor hockey, and curling.



Now 23 years old, Matthew has become a Special Olympics International Sargent Shriver Global Messenger and a member of the Special Olympics International Board of Directors, where he shares athletes’ perspectives with leaders of this global movement.

YouTube tags: TED, TEDxVancouver, TEDxVancouver 2015, Vancouver, TEDx, Rogers Arena,

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu