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BLACK HOLES an essential component of our universe - Space Discovery Documentary

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BLACK HOLES an essential component of our universe - Space Discovery Documentary

All objects exert an attractive gravitational force which depends on their mass.

Now, imagine an object with a very large mass which is concentrated into such a small volume that the gravitational field generated is powerful enough to prevent anything from escaping its clutches – even light.

This bizarre concept intrigues everyone, in particular physicists who theorise about the nature of matter, space and time, and astrophysicists who look for real black holes out in space.

Their study brings together the big ideas in fundamental science: Einstein’s theory of gravity – general relativity; the theory of the very small – quantum mechanics; and the origin and evolution of the universe – cosmology.

In recent years scientists have sought the answers to questions such as does a black hole have a temperature? What exactly happens when an object falls into a black hole? How many black holes are there in our galaxy? What is the role of black holes in galaxy evolution?
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Black Holes - An essential component of our universe | Space Discovery Documentary

All objects exert an attractive gravitational force which depends on their mass. Now, imagine an object with a very large mass which is concentrated into such a small volume that the gravitational field generated is powerful enough to prevent anything from escaping its clutches – even light. This bizarre concept intrigues everyone, in particular physicists who theorise about the nature of matter, space and time, and astrophysicists who look for real black holes out in space. Their study brings together the big ideas in fundamental science: Einstein’s theory of gravity – general relativity; the theory of the very small – quantum mechanics; and the origin and evolution of the universe – cosmology. In recent years scientists have sought the answers to questions such as does a black hole have a temperature? What exactly happens when an object falls into a black hole? How many black holes are there in our galaxy? What is the role of black holes in galaxy evolution?

#Space
#Documentary
#Universe


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Black Hole - Dive into the Power Centers of the Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

This groundbreaking new series follows a trail of energy into the power centers of the universe. Each program visualizes these realms based on current scientific data and uses state of the art supercomputer simulations. Dive into the heart of a supermassive black hole, fly down onto the toxic landscapes of alien planets and ride along the roiling surface of a star that's about to explode!
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National Geographic The Universe Space Discovery Documentary Travel Between the Galaxies

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Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Death Of The Universe Space Discovery Documentary

Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Death Of The Universe Space Discovery Documentary

Black holes: Most Powerful Objects in the Universe Discovery Channel HD

Discovery Channel HD
The Doppler shifts of stars near the cores of galaxies indicate that they are rotating around tremendous masses with very steep gravity gradients, suggesting black holes. Although quasars appear faint when viewed from Earth, they are visible from extreme distances, being the most luminous objects in the known universe.
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The Big Bang - How Was The Universe Created / Black Hole / Space Documentary

In the first second after the universe began, the surrounding temperature was about 10 billion degrees Fahrenheit (5.5 billion Celsius), according to NASA. The cosmos contained a vast array of fundamental particles such as neutrons, electrons and protons. These decayed or combined as the universe got cooler.

This early soup would have been impossible to look at, because light could not carry inside of it. The free electrons would have caused light (photons) to scatter the way sunlight scatters from the water droplets in clouds, NASA stated. Over time, however, the free electrons met up with nuclei and created neutral atoms. This allowed light to shine through about 380,000 years after the Big Bang.

This early light — sometimes called the afterglow of the Big Bang — is more properly known as the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It was first predicted by Ralph Alpher and other scientists in 1948, but was found only by accident almost 20 years later. [Images: Peering Back to the Big Bang & Early Universe]

Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, both of Bell Telephone Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey, were building a radio receiver in 1965 and picking up higher-than-expected temperatures, according to NASA. At first, they thought the anomaly was due to pigeons and their dung, but even after cleaning up the mess and killing pigeons that tried to roost inside the antenna, the anomaly persisted.

Simultaneously, a Princeton University team (led by Robert Dicke) was trying to find evidence of the CMB, and realized that Penzias and Wilson had stumbled upon it. The teams each published papers in the Astrophysical Journal in 1965.





























































































































































































































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The Connected Universe - Space Documentary

How does the universe work?
How does the universe work? Understanding the universe's birth and its ultimate fate are essential first steps to unveil the mechanisms of how it works. This, in turn, requires knowledge of its history, which started with the Big Bang.

Previous NASA investigations with the Cosmic Microwave Background Explorer (COBE) and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have measured the radiation from the universe when it was only 300,000 years old, confirming theoretical models of its early evolution. With its improved sensitivity and resolution, ESA's Planck observatory probed the long wavelength sky to new depths during its 2-year survey, providing stringent new constraints on the physics of the first few moments of the universe. Moreover, the possible detection and investigation of the so-called B-mode polarization pattern on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) impressed by gravitational waves during those initial instants will provide clues for how the large-scale structures we observe today came to be.

Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other observatories showed that the universe is expanding at an ever-increasing rate, implying that some day - in the very distant future - anyone looking at the night sky would see only our Galaxy and its stars. The billions of other galaxies will have receded beyond detection by these future observers. The origin of the force that is pushing the universe apart is a mystery, and astronomers refer to it simply as dark energy. This new, unknown component, which comprises ~68% of the matter-energy content of the universe, will determine the ultimate fate of all. Determining the nature of dark energy, its possible history over cosmic time, is perhaps the most important quest of astronomy for the next decade and lies at the intersection of cosmology, astrophysics, and fundamental physics.

Knowing how the laws of physics behave at the extremes of space and time, near a black hole or a neutron star, is also an important piece of the puzzle we must obtain if we are to understand how the universe works. Current observatories operating at X-ray and gamma-ray energies, such as the Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR, Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and ESA's XMM-Newton, are producing a wealth of information on the conditions of matter near compact sources, in extreme gravity fields unattainable on Earth.

Cosmic Energy Cold Sparks to Black Holes Documentary

THIS VIDEO IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY.

What's the hottest place in the universe? What's it like inside a Black Hole? This video climbs the power scales of the universe, from the coldest and bleakest reaches of our galaxy on out to the hottest and most violent places known. How and where do Earth and humanity fit within the immensely powerful scales that define our universe?

All across the immense reaches of time and space, energy is being exchanged, transferred, released, in a great cosmic pinball game we call our universe.

To see how energy stitches the cosmos together, and how we fit within it, we now journey through the cosmic power scales of the universe, from atoms nearly frozen to stillness. To Earth's largest explosions. From stars colliding, exploding, to distant centers of power so strange, and violent, they challenge our imaginations.

Today, energy is very much on our minds, as we search for ways to power our civilization and serve the needs of our citizens. But what is energy? Where does it come from? And where do we stand within the great power streams that shape time and space?

Energy comes from a Greek word for activity or working. In physics, it's simply the property or the state of anything in our universe that allows it to do work. Whether it's thermal, kinetic, electro-magnetic, chemical, or gravitational.

The 19th century German scientist Hermann von Helmholtz found that all forms of energy are equivalent, that one form can be transformed into any other. The laws of physics say that in a closed system - such as our universe - energy is conserved. It may be converted, concentrated, or dissipated, but it's never lost.

Humans today generate about two and a half trillion watts of electrical power. How does that stack up to the power generated by planet Earth? Deep inside our planet, the radioactive decay of elements such as uranium and thorium generates 44 trillion watts of power. As this heat rises to the surface, it drives the movement of Earth's crustal plates, and powers volcanoes.

Remarkably, that's just a fraction of the energy released by a large hurricane in the form of rain. At the storm's peak, it can rise to 600 trillion watts. A hurricane draws upon solar heat collected in tropical oceans in the summer. You have to jump another power of ten to reach the estimated total heat flowing through Earth's atmosphere and oceans from the equator to the poles, and another two to get the power received by the Earth from the sun, at 174 quadrillion watts.

Believe it or not, there's one human technology that has exceeded this level. The AN602 hydrogen bomb was detonated by the Soviet Union on October 30, 1961. It unleashed some 1400 times the combined power of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima bombs. With a blast yield of up to 57,000 tons of TNT, it generated 5.3 trillion trillion watts, if only for a tiny fraction of a second. That's 5.3 Yottawatts, a term that will come in handy as we now begin to ascend the power scales of the universe.

To Nikolai Kardashev, a Level 2 civilization would achieve a constant energy output 80 times higher than the Russian superbomb. That's equivalent to the total luminosity of our sun, a medium-sized star that emits 375 yottawatts. However, in the grand scheme of things, our sun is but a cold spark in a hot universe. Look up into Southern skies and you'll see the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way.

Deep within is the brightest star yet discovered. R136a1 is 10 million times brighter than the sun. Now if that star happened to go supernova, at its peak, it would blast out photons with a luminosity of around 500 billion yottawatts. To advance to a level three civilization, you have to marshal the power of an entire galaxy. The Milky Way, with about two hundred billion stars, has an estimated total luminosity of 3 trillion yottawatts, a three followed by 36 zeros.

To boldly go beyond Level 3, a civilization would need to marshal the power of a quasar. A quasar is about a thousand times brighter than our galaxy. Here is where cosmic power production enters a whole new realm, based on the physics of extreme gravity. It was Isaac Newton who first defined gravity as the force that pulls the apple down, and holds the earth in orbit around the sun. Albert Einstein redefined it in his famous General Theory of Relativity.

Gravity isn't simply the attraction of objects like stars and planets, he said, but a distortion of space and time, what he called space-time. If space-time is like a fabric, he said, gravity is the warping of this fabric by a massive object like a star. A planet orbits a star when it's caught in this warped space, like a ball spinning around a roulette wheel.

National Geographic Exploring the Universe Documentary 2020 HD 1080p

National Geographic Exploring the Universe Documentary 2019 HD 1080p
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Exploring Universe
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Published on 13 Oct 2017
National Geographic Exploring the Universe Documentary 2019 HD 1080p
First there was the Big Bang, the point when the Universe and even space and time were created out of the void. And after that there was darkness – because the Universe contained little more than hydrogen and helium gas. It was not until a few hundred million years later, after the first stars were formed, that anything became visible. This thirteen-billion-year-old light is still en route to us and can be received by our telescopes.

The ‘early’ Universe is an important research theme in Leiden astronomy. Hardly surprising, as the origin and evolution of stars, galaxies and black holes largely determine the history and the future of the Universe.
Astronomers want to understand the Universe, from the Big Bang to the present day, and what the future will hold. In Leiden they focus on two key questions: ‘How did stars and planets originate’ and ‘How were galaxies and black holes formed in the young Universe?’ A new generation of telescopes – just operational or still under construction - will help them find the answers. Maybe we will even detect signs of life on planets outside our solar system.
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Biggest Black hole in the Universe Placed In Our Solar System Discovery Channel HD

Black holes can get pretty big, but there's a special class that is the biggest of the big, absolute yawning monster black holes. And astronomers seem to have identified an absolute specimen, clocking in at 40 billion times the mass of the Sun.

It's at the centre of a galaxy called Holmberg 15A, a supergiant elliptical galaxy around 700 million light-years away, which in turn sits at the centre of the Abell 85 galaxy cluster.

The object is one of the biggest black holes ever found, and the biggest found by tracking the movement of the stars around it.
But that extraterrestrial presence on regular display is, of course, a fiction. No life beyond Earth has ever been found; there is no evidence that alien life has ever visited our planet. It’s all a story..

Discovery Channel HD

Solar System & Black Hole Documentary Secrets of the Universe

Solar System & Black Hole Documentary Secrets of the Universe

The Mysterious and Powerful Force of Gravity

Experts explain how gravity has the ability to bend light and even time. This is why the immense gravitational pull of a black hole distorts everything around it. |

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Origins of the Universe 101 | National Geographic

How old is the universe, and how did it begin? Throughout history, countless myths and scientific theories have tried to explain the universe's origins. The most widely accepted explanation is the big bang theory. Learn about the explosion that started it all and how the universe grew from the size of an atom to encompass everything in existence today.
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Origins of the Universe 101 | National Geographic


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The Great Secret of Black Holes Full HD Documentary

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Black Holes and the High Energy Universe

For more 4K space, and more great History and Science than you'll ever watch, check out our sister network...

Astronomers are probing the high-energy cosmic frontier with a series of key missions: Fermi, Swift, Chandra, NuSTAR, and Hubble. This video was inspired by a NASA event at the National Air and Space Museum, called Our Violent Universe.

You can find a video record of this important event along with full credits at:

Images and audio provided by: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

ABOUT US
Here at SpaceRip, we value the exploration of the unknown. We surpass boundaries for the sake of uncovering the mysteries of the cosmos and what they may tell us about our origin and our future. With our videos, we hope to educate our viewers on how we fit into the universe, and more so how we can do our part to better it.

By partnering with MagellanTV, we hope to explore the human experience through entertaining and informative videos. Our viewers are taken on a journey from far away planets to our very own Earth for a high definition glimpse into the story of our universe.

Stephen Hawking explains black holes in 90 seconds - BBC News

What are black holes? A short animated explanation of black holes from the world’s most famous physicist and Radio 4’s Reith Lecturer, Professor Stephen Hawking. Created by Aardman Studios.

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Black Holes - A window into other dimensions

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Stephen Hawking's big ideas... made simple | Guardian Animations

No time to read Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time? In just two and a half minutes, Alok Jha explains why black holes are doomed to shrink into nothingness then explode with the energy of a million nuclear bombs, and rewinds to the big bang and the origin of the universe?
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Naked Science - Birth of the Universe

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Where does a cup of coffee come from? In this film, it’s not Starbucks, it’s stars busting. We go right back to the beginning of time to show where the ingredients in your cup of coffee were born.

The main ingredient is hydrogen; it makes up most of the water in your cup. And that formed in the big bang. How it got from there, into your cappuccino is one of the most dramatic stories in science. It has taken thousands of scientists to track its trail. We follow it through stars and galaxies, exploding supernovae, and giant clouds of gas to show just how it reached your cup.

But that isn’t the end of the story. For where it goes in the future, depends on the fate of the universe. Will it carry on expanding for ever, or tear itself apart?

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