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Black Holes and the Fundamental Laws of Physics - with Jerome Gauntlett

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Black Holes and the Fundamental Laws of Physics - with Jerome Gauntlett

Black holes are extraordinary and may even hold the key to unlocking the next phase in our understanding of the laws of physics.
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Black holes are amongst the most extraordinary objects that are known to exist in the universe. Jerome Gauntlett will discuss their fascinating properties and describe the dramatic recent observations of black holes using gravitational waves. He will also explain why it is believed that black holes hold the key to unlocking the next level of our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics.

Jerome Gauntlett is a professor of theoretical physics at Imperial College. His principal research interests are focussed on string theory, quantum field theory and black holes. Most recently he has been investigating whether string theory techniques can be used to study exotic states of matter that arise in condensed matter physics. He was Head of the Theoretical Physics Group at Imperial from 2011-2016.

He was the theoretical physics consultant for the film The Theory of Everything and he has an Erdos-Bacon number of six (having written a paper with Shing-Tung Yau and appeared in the film Windrider with Nicole Kidman).

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Q&A - Black Holes and the Fundamental Laws of Physics - with Jerome Gauntlett

Do gravitational waves give an indication of the distribution of black holes? Can Hawking radiation help us detect black holes? Jerome Gauntlett answers audience questions following his talk:


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Jerome Gauntlett is a professor of theoretical physics at Imperial College. His principal research interests are focussed on string theory, quantum field theory and black holes. Most recently he has been investigating whether string theory techniques can be used to study exotic states of matter that arise in condensed matter physics. He was Head of the Theoretical Physics Group at Imperial from 2011-2016.

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What Happens Inside A Black Hole? - with Jerome Gauntlett

What would happen if you were to cross the event horizon and venture into a black hole?
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In this short clip from his talk on black holes, theoretical physicist Jerome Gauntlett explains spaghettification, singularity and all of the truly spooky things that would happen to you deep inside a black hole.

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Jerome Gauntlett is a professor of theoretical physics at Imperial College. His principal research interests are focussed on string theory, quantum field theory and black holes. Most recently he has been investigating whether string theory techniques can be used to study exotic states of matter that arise in condensed matter physics. He was Head of the Theoretical Physics Group at Imperial from 2011-2016.

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The Physics of Black Holes - with Chris Impey

Black holes are the most extreme objects in the universe yet every galaxy has one at its centre.
Buy Chris' book Einstein's Monsters: The Life and Times of Black Holes :

Chris Impey explores the questions this profound discovery can help answer and the role black holes have played in theoretical physics.

Chris Impey is a University Distinguished Professor and deputy head of the astronomy department at the University of Arizona. His research has been supported by $18 million in grants from NASA and the National Science Foundation, and he has had 24 projects given time on astronomy's premier research facility, the Hubble Space Telescope.

This talk was filmed in the Ri on 9 May 2019.

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The Monster Black Hole at the Center of the Milky Way

Jan. 25, 2017
Dr. Andrea Ghez (University of California, Los Angeles)
By measuring the rapid orbits of the stars near the center of our galaxy, Dr. Ghez and her colleagues have moved the case for a supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way from a possibility to a certainty. She reports on her pioneering observations and discusses some of the surprising results this work has led to.

Q&A: The Physics of Black Holes - with Chris Impey

How are worm holes created? What's the current thinking around black hole creation and dark matter? Chris Impey answers audiences questions following his talk.

Buy Chris' book Einstein's Monsters: The Life and Times of Black Holes :

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Chris Impey is a University Distinguished Professor and deputy head of the astronomy department at the University of Arizona. His research has been supported by $18 million in grants from NASA and the National Science Foundation, and he has had 24 projects given time on astronomy's premier research facility, the Hubble Space Telescope.

This talk was filmed in the Ri on 9 May 2019.

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A very special thank you to our Patreon supporters who help make these videos happen, especially:
Andrew McGhee, Dave Ostler, David Lindo, David Schick, Erik Shepherd, Greg Nagel, Ivan Korolev, Joe Godenzi, Julia Stone, Lasse T. Stendan, Lester Su, Osian Gwyn Williams, Paul Brown, Radu Tizu, Rebecca Pan, Robert Hillier, Robert Reinecke and Roger Baker.
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Black Holes, Exploding Stars, and the Runaway Universe: A Life in Science

January 23, 2019
Dr. Alex Filippenko (University of California, Berkeley) reviews his fascinating research career in astronomy, focusing on his work with black holes and with active galaxies and supernovae (exploding stars) -- and their role in helping us determine the ultimate fate of the universe. He also talks about some of the circumstances and people that influenced his work as a scientist, about the importance of education and outreach for the public support of science, and about his work to help ensure the future of Lick Observatory, the first permanently occupied mountain-top observatory in the world.

Kip Thorne - Why Black Holes are Astonishing (Pt. 2)

Black holes warp space and time, squeeze matter to a vanishing point, and trap light so that it cannot escape. Black holes, with masses millions or billions times that of our sun, sit at the center of galaxies. How can black holes perform such stupendous tricks, and what can we learn from them?

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Kip Thorne is a theoretical physicist, known for contributions in gravitational physics and astrophysics. He was the Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics at the California Institute of Technology until 2009.

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Closer to Truth presents the world’s greatest thinkers exploring humanity’s deepest questions. Discover fundamental issues of existence. Engage new and diverse ways of thinking. Appreciate intense debates. Share your own opinions. Seek your own answers.

Black Holes and the Structure of Spacetime by Juan Maldacena

PUBLIC LECTURES

Black Holes and the Structure of Spacetime by Juan Maldacena

DATE: 25 May 2018, 16:00 to 18:00
VENUE: Chandrasekhar Auditorium, ICTS, Bangalore


Black holes are fascinating objects predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity. Though they were initially viewed as pathological and unphysical solutions, they were later understood to be a solid and generic outcome of the theory. They are objects where the distortion of space and time is so extreme that it defies imagination. Black holes give rise to paradoxes whose resolution requires us to modify our conception of spacetime. We will review how black holes went from being an apparently unphysical solutions to a central tool for discovering new perspectives on the nature of spacetime.

Solving the Puzzle of Black Holes: Hawking, Entropy, and a Theory of Everything

With the power of math, scientists are going even further, using equations to “look” inside black holes, peering at the central singularity where general relativity and quantum mechanics collide.

PARTICIPANTS: Cumrun Vafa

MODERATOR: Brian Greene

MORE INFO ABOUT THE PROGRAM AND PARTICIPANTS:

This program is part of the BIG IDEAS SERIES, made possible with support from the JOHN TEMPLETON FOUNDATION.

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TOPICS:

0:01 - Explanation of the concept of entropy
5:03 - Cumrun Vafa intro
6:06 - The puzzle of entropy in black holes
10:25 - Measuring black hole entropy
13:08 - Problems with Hawking's argument
15:20 - Explanation of string theory and how it describes a black hole
22:05 - The puzzle of Hawking radiation
28:03 - What happens at the center of a black hole?

PROGRAM CREDITS:

- Produced by John Plummer
- Associate Produced by Laura Dattaro
- Animation/Editing by Josh Zimmerman
- Music provided by APM
- Additional images and footage provided by: Getty Images, Shutterstock, Videoblocks

This program was recorded live at the 2018 World Science Festival and has been edited and condensed for YouTube.

Watch the full unedited program here:
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Origins of the Laws of Nature - Peter Atkins

Thermodynamics. Speed of light. Conservation of energy. Where do the fundamental laws of nature come from?
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Peter's book Conjuring the Universe: The Origins of the Laws of Nature is available now -

Peter Atkins explores the pieces that build up the complexity of the universe and argues that it all came from very little, or arguably from nothing at all.

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Peter Atkins began his academic life as an undergraduate at the University of Leicester, and remained there for his PhD. He then went to the University of California, Los Angeles as a Harkness Fellow and returned to Oxford as lecturer in physical chemistry and fellow of Lincoln College in 1965, where he remained as professor of chemistry until his retirement in 2007. He has received honorary doctorates from universities in the United Kingdom (Leicester), the Netherlands (Utrecht), and Russia (Mendeleev University, Moscow, and Kazan State Technological University) and has been a visiting professor at universities in France, Japan, China, New Zealand, and Israel.

This talk and Q&A was filmed in the Ri on 21 May 2018.

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A very special thank you to our Patreon supporters who help make these videos happen, especially:
Ashok Bommisetti, Avrahaim Chein, bestape, Elizabeth Greasley, Greg Nagel, Lester Su, Rebecca Pan, Robert D Finrock and Will Knott.
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Black hole Firewalls - with Sean Carroll and Jennifer Ouellette

What would you experience if you jumped into a black hole?
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Conventionally, physicists have assumed that if the black hole is large enough, the gravitational forces won't become extreme until you approach the singularity. There, the gravitational pull will be so much stronger on your feet than your head, that you will be 'spaghettified'. Now, a new theory proposes that instead of spaghettification, you will encounter a massive wall of fire that will incinerate you on the spot, before you get close to turning into vermicelli.

In this special Ri event, science writer Jennifer Ouellette and physicist Sean Carroll explore the black hole firewall paradox, the exotic physics that underlies the new theory and what the paradox tells us about how new scientific theories are proposed, tested and accepted.

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Black Holes, Hawking Radiation and the Structure of Spacetime, Juan Maldacena, IAS

Black holes are fascinating objects predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity. Though they were initially viewed as pathological and unphysical solutions, they were later understood to be a solid and generic outcome of the theory. They are objects where the distortion of space and time is so extreme that it defies imagination. Black holes give rise to paradoxes whose resolution requires us to modify our conception of spacetime. We will review how black holes evolved from being understood as apparently unphysical solutions to a central tool for discovering new perspectives on the nature of spacetime.

Pulsars, Magnetars, Black Holes (Oh My!): The Wickedly Cool Stellar Undead

The biggest stars burn the fastest and brightest, and when they die, they do so spectacularly, exploding as supernovae and leaving behind some of the most fantastic objects in the universe: neutron stars and black holes. In this public science talk recorded at James Madison University on April 17, 2014, Dr. Scott Ransom (NRAO/UVa) discussed how these crazy objects are created, some of their amazing properties and why we (probably!) don't need to worry about them too much here in our cozy homes on Earth.

To learn more about our public science presentations, and to be informed, when our next ones will take place, please visit our website:

Andrew Strominger: Solving the Puzzle of Black Holes

Harvard University Professor of Physics Andrew Strominger explores the deep theoretical puzzles that have driven black hole research and the insights achieved by recent breakthroughs.

This program is part of the Big Ideas Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation.

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What's Inside A Black Hole? - Black Holes Explained - Origin of the Solar System

As Hawking says, the black holes would evaporate. During evaporation, the black hole emits energy in the form of the positive particles that escape. ... So, yes, black holes do die, and they do so when the theories of the extremely large come together with the theories of the very small.

Professor Kip Thorne's Public Lecture - A Century of Relativity

A Century of Relativity: from the Big Bang to Black Holes to Interstellar - Professor Kip Thorne From Caltech
NB: Some copyrighted film clips have been removed from this recording
Recorded at Monash University 22nd October 2015

From the Big Bang to Black Holes and Gravitational Waves - K. Thorne - 3/11/2016

GR100 Public Lecture:
- 100 Years of Relativity: From the Big Bang to Black Holes and Gravitational Waves, by Kip Thorne, Richard P. Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, Emeritus, Caltech
- Introduction by Fiona A. Harrison, Benjamin M. Rosen Professor of Physics; Kent and Joyce Kresa Leadership Chair, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech

Learn more about General Relativity at One Hundred: The Sixth Biennial Francis Bacon Conference held at Caltech and The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens from March 10 -12, 2016:

Produced in association with Caltech Academic Media Technologies. ©2016 California Institute of Technology

What is a Black Hole? - Stephen Hawking's final theory

~ The black hole information paradox and Soft Hair ~
You can check out Google's Science Journal app at

What does Stephen Hawking's last paper on black holes with soft hair say about the black hole information paradox?

If you liked this video check out these:
The Most MYSTERIOUS Object in the Universe
Why is the universe flat?






creator: dianna cowern
editing: dianna and eric birkemeier, and jabril ashe
animations: keegan larwin, kyle norby and dianna
research: sophia chen
writing: dianna cowern, sophia and dan walsh
script editing: dan abromowitz

Thanks to Andrew Strominger, Derek Muller and Kyle Kitzmiller!

Thanks to Matt Parker for the footage of the flaming parabola of fire” - from Festival of the Spoken Nerd show Just For Graphs” - fotsn.com/j4g -

Paper source:

The Big Picture: From the Big Bang to the Meaning of Life - with Sean Carroll

Award-winning scientist and writer Sean Carroll ties together the fundamental laws of physics governing the workings of the cosmos with the everyday human experience we all share.
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Buy Sean's book The Big Picture -

The talk, given at the Royal Institution in October 2016, will take us on a breath-taking journey from the origin of the Universe, through the evolution of life and consciousness, to the eternal question of what it all really means.

Dr Sean Carroll is an astrophysicist at the California Institute of Technology. He has written a variety of popular science books along with textbooks and has long been interested in the biggest questions in astronomy: Where does probability come from? How does time work? What is dark matter and dark energy?

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This lecture was recorded at the Ri on 17 October 2016.

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