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Brain Tricks - This Is How Your Brain Works

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7 Myths About The Brain You Thought Were True

Blow your mind with these brain myths!
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Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz).
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After watching this, your brain will not be the same | Lara Boyd | TEDxVancouver

In a classic research-based TEDx Talk, Dr. Lara Boyd describes how neuroplasticity gives you the power to shape the brain you want. Recorded at TEDxVancouver at Rogers Arena on November 14, 2015.

YouTube Tags: brain science, brain, stroke, neuroplasticity, science, motor learning, identity, TED, TEDxVancouver, TEDxVancouver 2015, Vancouver, TEDx, Rogers Arena, Vancouver speakers, Vancouver conference, ideas worth spreading, great idea,

Our knowledge of the brain is evolving at a breathtaking pace, and Dr. Lara Boyd is positioned at the cutting edge of these discoveries. In 2006, she was recruited by the University of British Columbia to become the Canada Research Chair in Neurobiology and Motor Learning. Since that time she has established the Brain Behaviour Lab, recruited and trained over 40 graduate students, published more than 80 papers and been awarded over $5 million in funding.

Dr. Boyd’s efforts are leading to the development of novel, and more effective, therapeutics for individuals with brain damage, but they are also shedding light on broader applications. By learning new concepts, taking advantage of opportunities, and participating in new activities, you are physically changing who you are, and opening up a world of endless possibility.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at
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Audio Illusion Brain Tricks

use it wearing headphones
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7 Optical Illusions That Will Put Your Brain to Work

Do you like puzzles? Even in the pre-internet era, optical illusions were very popular. You know, pictures with a full-fledged landscape, a portrait or a simple still life, but if you look at them from a certain angle, it miraculously turns into something different. For example, the branches of trees take the shape of faces, the waves of a raging ocean turn into silhouettes, and sometimes it happens that the beautiful girl on a portrait gets old and becomes a disheveled old lady with a huge nose right in front of your eyes
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The Brain

The Brain: Structure and Function

In this video Paul Andersen explains the structures and functions of seventeen major parts of the brain. He begins with a quick discussion of brain evolution and ends with a review of the major parts presented inside the brainstem, cerebellum, thalamus, and cerebrum.

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Music Attribution
Title: String Theory
Artist: Herman Jolly


All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing:
Angelo.romano. SVG Drawing Representing a Number of Sports Icons: Ice Hockey, Athletcs, Basketball and Football (soccer), October 2, 2007. self-made with Inkscape, starting from a number of existing SVG drawings taken from the Wikimedia Commons (namely, Image:Basketball ball.svg, Image:Soccer ball.svg and vectorized versions of Image:Olympic pictogram Ice hockey.png and Image:Olympic pictogram Athletics.png.
Bradley, M M, and P J Lang. Measuring Emotion: The Self-Assessment Manikin and the Semantic Differential. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry 25, no. 1 (March 1994): 49--59.
caustic, lunar. Approximately 6 Weeks from Conception, I.e. 8 Weeks from LMP. Shot with 105 Mm Micro-NIKKOR Lens with 2 off Camera SB-800's. Specimen Is Submerged in Alcohol. This Is a Spontaneous (ie. Not a Termination) Abortion. It Was Extruded Intact with the Gestational Sac Surrounded by Developing Placental Tissue and Decidual Tissue. This Was Carefully Opened to Avoid Damaging the Embryo., January 23, 2009. Embryo.
College, OpenStax. Illustration from Anatomy & Physiology, Connexions Web Site. Jun 19, 2013., [object HTMLTableCellElement]. Anatomy & Physiology, Connexions Web site. Jun 19, 2013.
Dobschütz, Sigismund von. Deutsch: Welpe, May 27, 2011. Own work.
File:1421 Sensory Homunculus.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 19, 2014.
File:Animal Diversity.png. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 18, 2014.
File:Basal Ganglia Circuits.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, January 27, 2014.
File:Bilaterian-Plan.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 18, 2014.
File:Corpus Callosum.png. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 19, 2014.
File:EmbryonicBrain.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 18, 2014.
File:Lobes of the Brain NL.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 19, 2014.
File:Skull and Brain Normal Human.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 18, 2014.
File:Tiburón.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 18, 2014.
GerryShaw. English: Cortical Neuron Stained with Antibody to Neurofilament Subunit NF-L in Green. In Red Are Neuronal Stem Cells Stained with Antibody to Alpha-Internexin. Image Created Using Antibodies from EnCor Biotechnology Inc., February 4, 2000. Own work.
Government, U. S. The Seal of the President of the United States. The Blazon Is Defined in Executive Order 10860 As:, [object HTMLTableCellElement]. Extracted from PDF version of Federal Assistance for Impacted Communities guide, archived here, with some small cleanups.
Griffiths, Si. English: Brick Wall, March 12, 2005. Own work.
Hagens, Wouter. English: Kitten about 2 Months Old, December 3, 2013. Own work.
Häggström, Mikael. English: Organ Adapted for Use in Häggström Diagrams, January 16, 2008. Image:Gray970.png (Public domain license).
illustrator, Patrick J. Lynch, medical. Brain Human Sagittal Section, December 23, 2006. Patrick J. Lynch, medical illustrator.

A Journey Inside Your Brain

How does the brain work? Your brain contains billions of nerve cells. There are about 100 billion of them, about as many as the stars in the Milky Way! You get most of them at birth, but as you get older, your brain keeps producing new ones. Neurons send somewhere between 5 to 50 messages every second!

Neurons work so hard they produce enough energy to light up a low voltage LED bulb. Bot just one neuron can’t do much by itself, so they work together as teams. They talk in their secret language of electrical and chemical signals. And when you do something again and again, so the same signal is going through, the message gets even faster and is more likely to reach the goal!

TIMESTAMPS:
Sensory neurons 2:19
Motor neurons 2:30
Interneurons 2:42
Why you can feel different emotions 3:12
What your “little brain” does 3:47
How neurons work 4:33
What the brainstem is in charge of 6:10

#humanbody #brain #brightside

Other videos you might like:
A Simple Exercise Will Reboot Your Brain In 30 Seconds
9 Optical Illusions to Test How Good Your Brain Is
Which Side of Your Brain Is More Dominant?

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9 Proofs You Can Increase Your Brain Power

The human brain is probably the most mysterious organ in our body. Scientists keep learning new facts about its work, but it still hides lots of secrets. There are a few simple ways to boost your intellect and improve your brain power, and they will surely surprise you!

TIMESTAMPS
Chronic lack of sleep worsens memory 0:40
Prolonged stress destroys the brain 1:07
Love and hate have a lot in common 1:29
The brain is sensitive to dehydration 1:53
Pregnancy changes the brain’s structure 2:13
The abundance of sugar reduces the ability to learn 2:39
Romantic love and maternal feelings are very similar 3:25
Painting improves the work of the brain 3:58
Reading trains the brain 4:33

SUMMARY
- During a full night’s sleep, brain cells remove toxic compounds dangerous to our brain.
- A decrease in memory, in the ability to learn, in self-control — these are the consequences that chronic stress is fraught with. 
- British scientists found out that love and hate originate in similar brain areas. 
- Our brain is almost 80% water.
- Scientists proved that pregnancy reduces the amount of gray matter in the brain areas responsible for social cognition and the ability to understand other people. 
- The abundance of fructose in the diet slows down the brain and reduces its ability to learn, remember information, and concentrate. 
- According to brain activity, romantic relationships and maternal feelings are very similar, but there are differences as well.
- A study showed that painting and contemplation of works of art improve the interaction between brain areas while slowing its aging.
- Oxford scientists proved that the process of reading trains the cognitive abilities of the brain. It also activates areas that aren’t used at other times.

Don’t forget to hit the like button below the video and click subscribe to join the Bright Side of life!

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BEST OPTICAL ILLUSIONS TO KICK START YOUR BRAIN

Here is a portion of the best optical illusions to kick-start your brain! Some of these tricky optical illusion games will break your mind! Try to focus on solving them and don't let anything bother you. These tricky brain games and puzzles will not just warm up your brain but also exercise it well.

00:14 - Can you read what's written in here? It's a cool way to test your brain! If you can see these words and sentences clearly then probably you have a well-trained brain.
02:03 - Let's see how attentive you are! Find cute pandas in these pictures and try to do it as quick as possible.
03:51 - Can you tell for sure if it's the same photo?! Take your time and try to find differences between these pictures!
05:14 - Hard riddles that adults fail, but kids crack without any effort! Well, some kids do fail, but not many of them. To crack these tricky riddles for kids, you'll need to distance yourself from the picture and let your eyes just wander around and suddenly you'll start to see the hidden words everywhere ????
07:20 - Amazing optical illusion riddles and brain games to test your vision and brain as well! If your brain elastic (as it should be) then you will easily read all of them, however, if your brain is not stretched, then you should add up more into your brain exercises routine! ????
09:32 - Can you guess right if these are real or fake? Sometimes it's almost impossible to find the right answer. These optical illusions will immediately blow your mind!
11:16 - Put on your glasses and try to see who is hiding here! Only those with perfect vision will crack these optical illusion puzzles and will be to tell us who is hidden in the last illusion picture ????

TELL me IN THE COMMENTS which optical illusion made you stuck in front of the screen for quite a time!

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How optical illusions trick your brain - Nathan S. Jacobs

View full lesson:

Optical illusions are images that seem to trick our minds into seeing something different from what they actually are. But how do they work? Nathan S. Jacobs walks us through a few common optical illusions and explains what these tricks of the eye can tell us about how our brains assemble visual information into the 3D world we see around us.

Lesson by Nathan S. Jacobs, animation by TED-Ed.

How Optical Illusions Trick Your Brain

Things are not at all as they seem... What are the different types of optical illusions and why are our eyes tricking us?

How The Human Eye Evolved To Be So Complex -
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How Your Eyes Trick Your Mind

Visual, or optical, illusions show us that our minds tend to make assumptions about the world - and what you think you see is often not the truth. Throughout history, curious minds have questioned why our eyes are so easily fooled by these simple drawings. Illusions, we have found, can reveal everything from how we process time and space to our experience of consciousness. Scroll down our interactive guide to find out why.

What Are Optical Illusions? - Definition & Types

In this lesson, we will explore the different types of optical illusions and discuss how they play tricks on our perception. Then you can test your knowledge with a fun quiz.

How Do Optical Illusions Work?

These are two identical, straight lines. Kind of boring, right? But what happens when you change what's going on around them? All of a sudden, the lines look like they've changed size in relation to each other; they could shrink and grow; they might change to different shades; they may stretch and compress; and they could bend, buckle, or even change directions. But even though it would seem like the lines themselves are changing, the only thing that's actually bending or buckling is your mind -- the truly mesmerizing part of optical illusions.

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How I Tricked My Brain To Like Doing Hard Things (dopamine detox)

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You probably don't have a problem playing video games or browsing social media on your phone. In fact I have no doubt you could sit in front of a screen and do both of those activities for 2 hours, or even longer without breaking your concentration.
But what about half an hour of studying? That might be too hard.
How about working on your side business for another hour? Doesn't sound too appealing.

Even though you logically know that studying, exercising, building a business or something equally productive, will bring you more benefits in the long run, you still prefer watching TV, playing video games and scrolling through social media.

One might argue that it's obvious why.
One activity is easy and doesn't require much effort, while the other activity is difficult and it requires you to apply yourself.

But some people seem to have no problem studying, exercising, or working on their side projects, regularly.

Which begs the question: Why are some people more motivated to tackle difficult things?
And is there a way to make doing difficult things, easy?

References:



How Exactly Is the Human Brain Organized?

The human brain remains one of the biggest mysteries in science, but we’ve learned a lot about how it works over the years. In this episode, Patrick breaks down all things brain.
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In order to get accurate and precise data on the human brain, we need to use a piece of technology like functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI.

fMRIs are extremely common in modern neuroscience studies because the advanced tech can give us information about what kind of activity is happening in different parts of the brain in response to different tasks or just at rest. fMRIs work by showing us where blood is flowing in the brain, but they can’t tell you what someone is thinking.

The brain is a key component in our central nervous system (along with the spinal cord); it has to interpret and process information it receives from the outside world, and then coup with responses for it.

When we look at the brain from the side, we can see three big structures. The cerebrum, the cerebellum, and the spinal cord.

So today, we’re going to learn the regions of the brain, what happens in each one, and how to correctly interpret a headline that makes a claim about your brain.

#brain #neuroscience #nervoussystem #science #seeker #humanseries

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Human Brain: Facts, Functions & Anatomy

“The human brain is the command center for the human nervous system. It receives signals from the body's sensory organs and outputs information to the muscles. The human brain has the same basic structure as other mammal brains but is larger in relation to body size than any other brains.”

How Your Brain Works

“Your brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves make up a complex, integrated information-processing and control system known as your central nervous system. In tandem, they regulate all the conscious and unconscious facets of your life.”

Learning How Little We Know About the Brain

“So many large and small questions remain unanswered. How is information encoded and transferred from cell to cell or from network to network of cells? Science found a genetic code but there is no brain-wide neural code; no electrical or chemical alphabet exists that can be recombined to say ‘red’ or ‘fear’ or ‘wink’ or ‘run.’”

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How the Brain Works Part 3 (UCLA)

How the Brain Works
These brief videos provide an introductory appreciation of how we learn skills and information, move, think, feel, speak and remember. They are brought to you by the UCLA Brain Research Institute and by Bruce H. Dobkin, MD, who directs the neurorehabilitation program in the Department of Neurology at UCLA. The videos especially aim to reach out to students in grade school to stir their interest, and to people with disabilities in walking, using an affected upper extremity, and loss of memory from neurological diseases such as stroke, brain trauma, tumors, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, Parkinsons, and Alzheimers disease.

Video 1:
General organization of a real human brain.

Video 2:
The pathology of brain injuries and diseases. Rat versus human brain complexity. How do we reach for a ball? How do we walk?

Video 3:
How does practice enable us to learn and retain skills and information?

Video 4:
How can we drive the nervous system to adapt in ways that help restore lost skills after injury from disease? Can we reorganize the brains connections?

Brain tricks-How the Brain Works

How a fast brain may cause mistakes.
Your brain has to process a lot of data constantly. It deals with this data in different ways.
Daniel Kahneman proposed that you have fast thinking and slow thinking.
I’ll give you an example 2+2 = involves fast thinking
It is fast, automatic, frequent
173 x 294 would require slow thinking which is Slow, logical, calculating.
In an attempt to be efficient your brain will apply fast thinking as often as possible, but it may cause mistakes.
Fast thinking helps you fill in missing letters in the jumbled text but may cause you to not notice misspellings which are spelling tricks.
Fast thinking also likes to jump to conclusions.

How the Brain Works Part 2 (UCLA)

How the Brain Works
These brief videos provide an introductory appreciation of how we learn skills and information, move, think, feel, speak and remember. They are brought to you by the UCLA Brain Research Institute and by Bruce H. Dobkin, MD, who directs the neurorehabilitation program in the Department of Neurology at UCLA. The videos especially aim to reach out to students in grade school to stir their interest, and to people with disabilities in walking, using an affected upper extremity, and loss of memory from neurological diseases such as stroke, brain trauma, tumors, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, Parkinsons, and Alzheimers disease.

Video 1:
General organization of a real human brain.

Video 2:
The pathology of brain injuries and diseases. Rat versus human brain complexity. How do we reach for a ball? How do we walk?

Video 3:
How does practice enable us to learn and retain skills and information?

Video 4:
How can we drive the nervous system to adapt in ways that help restore lost skills after injury from disease? Can we reorganize the brains connections?
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How the Brain Works Part 4 (UCLA)

How the Brain Works
These brief videos provide an introductory appreciation of how we learn skills and information, move, think, feel, speak and remember. They are brought to you by the UCLA Brain Research Institute and by Bruce H. Dobkin, MD, who directs the neurorehabilitation program in the Department of Neurology at UCLA. The videos especially aim to reach out to students in grade school to stir their interest, and to people with disabilities in walking, using an affected upper extremity, and loss of memory from neurological diseases such as stroke, brain trauma, tumors, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, Parkinsons, and Alzheimers disease.

Video 1:
General organization of a real human brain.

Video 2:
The pathology of brain injuries and diseases. Rat versus human brain complexity. How do we reach for a ball? How do we walk?

Video 3:
How does practice enable us to learn and retain skills and information?

Video 4:
How can we drive the nervous system to adapt in ways that help restore lost skills after injury from disease? Can we reorganize the brains connections?

Will This Trick Your Brain? (Color TEST)

Your eyes and brain are pretty amazing!
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Written by Rachel Salt, Gregory Brown and Mitchell Moffit

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Further Reading:

Number of discernible colors for color-deficient observers estimated from the MacAdam limits

Afterimage of Perceptually Filled-in Surface

The primary visual cortex fills in color

Microsaccades: Small steps on a long way

Molecular Genetics of Human Color Vision: The Genes Encoding Blue, Green, and Red Pigments

Comparing levels of crosstalk with red/cyan, blue/yellow, and green/magenta anaglyph 3D glasses

Spooky Science: Discovering the Eerie Colors behind Afterimages

Plants and colour: Flowers and pollination

The influence of pigmentation patterning on bumblebee foraging from flowers of Antirrhinum majus.

Why Are So Many Bird Flowers Red?

Mighty Mutualisms: The Nature of Plant-pollinator Interactions

The number of known plants species in the world and its annual increase

3 Ways to Trick Your Brain Into Doing Hard Work

Sometimes, you sit down with the best of intentions and... nothing gets done. Like Eddie Morra at the beginning of Limitless, you put in the time, stay in the room, and yet the inspiration refuses to strike.

Other times, you just intend to jot something down and end up getting a ton of work done almost by accident. But it's not actually an accident; you've just successfully tricked your brain into working.

In this video, I'll share three ways you can successfully pull off this trick.

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How the Brain Works Part 1 (UCLA)

These brief videos provide an introductory appreciation of how we learn skills and information, move, think, feel, speak and remember. They are brought to you by the UCLA Brain Research Institute and by Bruce H. Dobkin, MD, who directs the neurorehabilitation program in the Department of Neurology at UCLA. The videos especially aim to reach out to students in grade school to stir their interest, and to people with disabilities in walking, using an affected upper extremity, and loss of memory from neurological diseases such as stroke, brain trauma, tumors, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, Parkinsons, and Alzheimers disease.

Video 1:
General organization of a real human brain.

Video 2:
The pathology of brain injuries and diseases. Rat versus human brain complexity. How do we reach for a ball? How do we walk?

Video 3:
How does practice enable us to learn and retain skills and information?

Video 4:
How can we drive the nervous system to adapt in ways that help restore lost skills after injury from disease? Can we reorganize the brains connections?

Brain Tricks - This Is How Your Brain Works

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Ever wonder how your brain processes information? These brain tricks and illusions help to demonstrate the two main systems of Fast and Slow Thinking in your brain.

Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz).

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Gregory Brown



Further Reading --

1) Thinking Fast and Slow - Daniel Khaneman
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