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CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

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CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

Teams of scientists and engineers are simulating the launch, early orbit phase and commissioning of the CHEOPS mission ahead of its launch slot of 15 October to 14 November. The simulations are taking place at the CHEOPS Mission Operations Centre at Torrejón de Ardoz, just outside Madrid in Spain. CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) is a powerful telescope that will obtain measurements from stars outside our Solar System that have known planets. This information will tell us more about the nature of these exoplanets and whether they have the right conditions for life.

CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

Integration of ESA’s Cheops science instrument (top) with the spacecraft platform (bottom) in the cleanroom at Airbus Defence and Space in Madrid, Spain. The science instrument, which includes among other elements the telescope and detector, was built and tested at the University of Bern, Switzerland. It was shipped to Spain in April to be integrated with the spacecraft platform for further tests and launch preparations. Once in orbit, Cheops will observe transits of known exoplanets around bright stars to characterise these planetary systems.
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CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

Scientists at the Geneva Observatory in Switzerland will be processing data from CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) - a powerful telescope that will soon be studying stars outside our Solar System already known to host planets. The Observatory has a rich history studying exoplanets. In 1995, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz discovered the first exoplanet orbiting a Sun-like star. The CHEOPS mission is a partnership between ESA and Switzerland with important contributions from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The CHEOPS launch slot is scheduled for the last quarter of 2019.

CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

Animation visualising ESA's CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite, Cheops, in orbit above Earth. In this view the satellite's telescope points to several different stars, one after the other. The beam represents the light from the star that Cheops is observing at a given point in time. Cheops will orbit Earth at an altitude of 700 km in a Sun-synchronous orbit, riding on the day-night terminator – such a configuration is also called dawn/dusk orbit. This orbit allows Cheops to point its instrument always towards the night side of Earth, in order to limit the impact on the measurements of sunlight and reflected stray light from Earth. To maximize the fraction of the sky where Cheops can perform observations, the instrument can be pointed at any time anywhere in the sky up to 60 degrees from the anti-Sun direction. Cheops will make observations of exoplanet-hosting stars to measure small changes in their brightness due to the transit of a planet across the star's disc. The information will enable accurate and precise measurements of the sizes of the orbiting planets to be made. Cheops will target stars hosting planets in the super-Earth to Neptune size range. By combining sizes with existing measurements of the planet masses, Cheops will provide an estimate of bulk density – a first step towards characterising planets outside our Solar System.
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CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

CHEOPS - CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite - will be the first mission dedicated to searching for exoplanetary transits by performing ultrahigh precision photometry on bright stars already known to host planets. The CHEOPS satellite is mounted on a longitudinal shaker that forces it to vibrate at different frequencies. At the beginning of the test, performed at RUAG Space in Zurich, Switzerland, low-frequency sine-wave vibrations of 5 Hz are applied. As the test progresses, a sweep, using sine waves of increasing frequency, is performed up to the maximum of 100 Hz.

CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

The CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) spacecraft has successfully passed its final testing phase in Spain before it will be shipped to the European spaceport in French Guiana for launch later this year. CHEOPS is a powerful telescope that will fix its gaze on exoplanets, known planets outside our Solar System, that are orbiting bright stars. The aim will be to obtain detailed information about these planets and discover which ones might have the right conditions for life.
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CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

ESA Cheops project scientist talks about the science that will be performed with the upcoming Characterising Exoplanet Satellite, Cheops, scheduled for launch in late 2019. The scientist describes how Cheops will make observations of exoplanet-hosting stars, targeting in particular stars hosting planets in the Earth-to-Neptune size range, and how it will measure small changes in their brightness – due to the transit of a planet across the star's disc – to determine precisely the sizes of these planets. Combined with measurements of the planet masses, this will provide an estimate of their mean density and so a first-step characterisation of planets beyond our Solar System.

CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

The space telescope CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS) has left a clean room in Switzerland, where it was assembled and tested, and is on its way to Madrid for further launch preparations. The telescope will study hundreds of known exoplanets using the transit method - measuring the dip in light as a planet transits its parent star. CHEOPS will herald a new era of discovery. Its precision measurements will give more detailed information about a planet’s structure, atmosphere and surface temperature. It was built at the University of Bern and the mission is a partnership between ESA and Switzerland with additional contributions from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Integration and testing of the CHEOPS spacecraft is ongoing and the project is on track to reach flight readiness by the end of 2018.

CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

In September 2018, the CHEOPS satellite underwent acoustic noise testing and Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) testing at ESA's technical centre in the Netherlands. During EMC testing, the satellite was mounted on mechanical ground support equipment that allowed its attitude with respect to the test antennas to be varied. The foam pyramids distributed on the floor are arranged to absorb reflections from the metal mechanical ground support equipment (painted white). The successful tests have shown that the satellite is compatible with its electromagnetic environment at launch and in orbit. The CHEOPS satellite also underwent acoustic noise testing in the Large European Acoustic Facility (LEAF). The satellite was placed in an elevated position and surrounded by microphones that monitored sound pressure levels during the test. The tests have shown that the satellite can withstand the high sound pressures of launch.

The CHEOPS satellite in the Large European Acoustic Facility

In September 2018, the CHEOPS satellite underwent acoustic noise testing in the Large European Acoustic Facility (LEAF) at ESA's technical centre in the Netherlands. The satellite was placed in an elevated position and surrounded by microphones that monitored sound pressure levels during the test. The tests have shown that the satellite can withstand the high sound pressures of launch. These were followed by Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) testing, also performed at ESA's technical centre, to demonstrate that CHEOPS is compatible with its electromagnetic environment at launch and in orbit.

Read the full story in the CHEOPS journal #14, at

Credit: ESA–A. Conigli; Airbus Defence & Space

More information about this video can be found at
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CHEOPS - Characterising Exoplanets

The Characterising Exoplanet Satellite, Cheops, has successfully completed its final testing phase at Airbus Defence and Space Spain, Madrid. The satellite has also passed a very important review that determined it is ready to fly. Cheops will be stored in Madrid for a few months before being shipped to the launch site in Kourou, French Guiana; launch is scheduled in the time slot between 15 October and 14 November 2019.

Cheops is our first mission to focus on exoplanets, or planets beyond our Solar System, orbiting stars other than the Sun. It will make observations of stars the are known to host exoplanets to measure small changes in their brightness due to the transit of the planet across the star's disc. Cheops will target in particular stars hosting planets in the Earth-to-Neptune size range. The information will enable precise measurements of the sizes of the orbiting planets to be made: combined with measurements of the planet masses, this will provide an estimate of their mean density – a first step to characterising planets outside our Solar System.

Cheops paves the way for the next generation of our exoplanet satellites, with two further missions – Plato and Ariel – planned for the next decade to tackle different aspects of the evolving field of exoplanet science.

The mission is a partnership between us and Switzerland with additional contributions from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. This film contains contributions from Nicola Rando, Cheops Project Manager, ESA; and Kate Isaak, Cheops Project Scientist, ESA.

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ESA - Satélite Cheops está pronto para o lançamento

O Satélite Cheops (Characterising Exoplanet Satellite) da ESA, foi recentemente declarado pronto para voar depois de completar uma série de testes finais.
Cheops decolará como passageiro secundário em um foguete Soyuz-Fregat lançado da base de Kourou, na Guiana Francesa. O satélite será armazenado nas instalações da Airbus Defense and Space em Madri por alguns meses antes de ser enviado para o local de lançamento, visando a data entre 15 de outubro e 14 de novembro de 2019.
“Estamos entusiasmados por lançar o Cheops no final deste ano”, afirma Günther Hasinger, Diretor de Ciência da ESA.
Com suas observações de altíssima precisão de estrelas que já conhecemos para hospedar exoplanetas, a missão permitirá uma caracterização de primeira etapa da composição e natureza dos planetas além do nosso Sistema Solar.
Cheops é uma missão de acompanhamento: fará observações de estrelas brilhantes hospedeiras de exoplanetas para medir pequenas mudanças em seu brilho devido ao trânsito de um planeta através do disco da estrela, mirando em particular as estrelas que hospedam planetas de tamanhos entre a Terra e Netuno. Saber quando e onde apontar para o céu, a fim de capturar esses trânsitos, torna a Cheops extremamente eficiente, maximizando o tempo que gasta monitorando eventos reais de trânsito.
As observações de trânsito irão fornecer medições precisas do tamanho de um planeta. Combinados com informações conhecidas sobre a massa, esses dados permitirão determinar sua densidade, dando-nos pistas vitais sobre sua composição e estrutura, indicando, por exemplo, se ela é predominantemente rochosa ou gasosa, ou se talvez abrigará oceanos significativos.
As observações de uma lista de alvos de exoplanetas definidos pela Equipe Científica de Cheops serão responsáveis por 80% do tempo de observação científica, enquanto os 20% restantes estarão disponíveis para cientistas em todo o mundo.

Seguindo os passos de Cheops, Platão e Ariel da ESA serão lançados no final dos anos 2020 para descobrir e investigar novos mundos em torno de outras estrelas.
Cheops é uma missão da ESA implementada em parceria com a Suíça, com importantes contribuições da Áustria, Bélgica, França, Alemanha, Hungria, Itália, Portugal, Espanha, Suécia e Reino Unido.
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CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite | Wikipedia audio article

This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:



00:00:44 1 History
00:01:52 2 Goals
00:03:31 3 See also



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SUMMARY
=======
CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) is a planned European space telescope for the study of the formation of extrasolar planets. The launch window for CHEOPS is October to November 2019.The mission aims to bring an optical Ritchey–Chrétien telescope with an aperture of 30 cm, mounted on a standard small satellite platform, into a Sun-synchronous orbit of about 700 km (430 mi) altitude. For the planned mission duration of 3.5 years, CHEOPS is to examine known transiting exoplanets orbiting bright and nearby stars.

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CHEOPS - CHaractersising ExOPlanet Satellite

CHEOPS - CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite - is the first mission dedicated to characterise exoplanets - planets that do not orbit the Sun - of nearby brilliant stars.The main objective of the Cheops mission is to search for planetary transits by means of ultrahigh precision photometry on known stars having planets orbiting them.

CHEOPS is the first S type (small) mission of ESA. These missions are designed to take advantage of existing technologies. They are low cost with a short development period in order to allow greater flexibility in response to new ideas from the scientific community. It is being developed in collaboration with the Swiss Space Office (SSO), a division of the Swiss State Secretariat for Education, Research and Innovation (SERI), and the University of Bern, Switzerland. The Swiss organisations lead the consortium of 11 ESA Member States contributing to the mission and represented in the CHEOPS Science Team. The spacecraft will be built by Airbus Defence and Space, Spain.
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The CHEOPS satellite in the Maxwell test facility

In September 2018, the CHEOPS satellite underwent acoustic noise testing and Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) testing at ESA's technical centre in the Netherlands. During EMC testing, the satellite was mounted on mechanical ground support equipment that allowed its attitude with respect to the test antennas to be varied. The foam pyramids distributed on the floor are arranged to absorb reflections from the metal mechanical ground support equipment (painted white). The successful tests have shown that the satellite is compatible with its electromagnetic environment at launch and in orbit.

Read the full story in the CHEOPS journal #14, at

Credit: ESA–A. Conigli; Airbus Defence & Space

More information about this video can be found at

CHEOPS - Characterising Exoplanets

CHEOPS - Characterising Exoplanets
The Characterising Exoplanet Satellite, Cheops, has successfully completed its final testing phase at Airbus Defence and Space Spain, Madrid. The satellite has also passed a very important review that determined it is ready to fly. Cheops will be stored in Madrid for a few months before being shipped to the launch site in Kourou, French Guiana; launch is scheduled in the time slot between 15 October and 14 November 2019.

Cheops is our first mission to focus on exoplanets, or planets beyond our Solar System, orbiting stars other than the Sun. It will make observations of stars the are known to host exoplanets to measure small changes in their brightness due to the transit of the planet across the star's disc. Cheops will target in particular stars hosting planets in the Earth-to-Neptune size range. The information will enable precise measurements of the sizes of the orbiting planets to be made: combined with measurements of the planet masses, this will provide an estimate of their mean density – a first step to characterising planets outside our Solar System.

Cheops paves the way for the next generation of our exoplanet satellites, with two further missions – Plato and Ariel – planned for the next decade to tackle different aspects of the evolving field of exoplanet science.

The mission is a partnership between us and Switzerland with additional contributions from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. This film contains contributions from Nicola Rando, Cheops Project Manager, ESA; and Kate Isaak, Cheops Project Scientist, ESA.

ARIEL - ESA'S NEW MEDIUM CLASS MISSION!

Follow us @ArielTelescope & Find us at

Hello and Welcome!

We are Ariel Space Mission, the new medium class mission selected by the European Space Agency (ESA), due for launch in 2028!

The goal of the ARIEL mission is to investigate the atmospheres of a thousand planets orbiting distant stars in order to address the fundamental questions on how planetary systems form and evolve! :-)

Videos by Bex Coates

CHEOPS - CHARACTERISING EXOPLANETS SATELLITE

Malgrado il nome, gli antichi egizi non c'entrano: la missione di classe S (small) approvata nei giorni scorsi dall'ESA si chiama CHEOPS perché è l'acronimo di CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite.









Exoplanet science with Cheops

Kate Isaak, our Cheops project scientist, talks to ESA Web TV about the science that will be performed with our upcoming Characterising Exoplanet Satellite, Cheops, scheduled for launch in late 2019. She describes how Cheops will make observations of exoplanet-hosting stars, targeting in particular stars hosting planets in the Earth-to-Neptune size range, and how it will measure small changes in their brightness – due to the transit of a planet across the star's disc – to determine precisely the sizes of these planets. Combined with measurements of the planet masses, this will provide an estimate of their mean density and so a first-step characterisation of planets beyond our Solar System.

Learn more:

★ Subscribe: and click twice on the bell button to receive our notifications.

Check out our full video catalog:
Follow ESA on Twitter:
On Facebook:
On Instagram:
On Flickr:

ESA is Europe's gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe's space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out to get up to speed on everything space related.

Copyright information about our videos is available here:

#ESA
#Exoplanets
#CHEOPS

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