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COVID-19 Animation: What Happens If You Get Coronavirus?

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COVID-19 Animation: What Happens If You Get Coronavirus?

This video 3D animation on COVID-19: What Happens If You Get Coronavirus is a collaboration between Nucleus Medical Media and our friends at the What If Channel. To watch super interesting hypothetical scenarios on the human body, humanity, the planet and the cosmos, please visit the What If Channel at
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HOW DOES COVID-19 AFFECT THE BODY?

Coronaviruses (CoV) are a family of viruses that cause sicknesses like the common cold, as well as more severe diseases, such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain – one that hasn’t previously been recognized in humans.
Coronaviruses cause diseases in mammals and birds. A zoonotic virus is one that is transmitted between animals and people. When a virus circulating in animal populations infects people, this is termed a “spillover event”.
How does CoVID-19 affect the body? The virus is fitted with protein spikes sticking out of the envelope that forms the surface and houses a core of genetic material. Any virus that enters your body looks for cells with compatible receptors – ones that allow it to invade the cell. Once they find the right cell, they enter and use the cell’s replication machinery to create copies of themselves. It is likely that COVID-19 uses the same receptor as SARS – found in both lungs and small intestines.
It is thought that CoVID-19 shares many similarities with SARS, which has three phases of attack: viral replication, hyper-reactivity of the immune system, and finally pulmonary destruction. Early on in infection, the coronavirus invades two types of cells in the lungs – mucus and cilia cells. Mucus keeps your lungs from drying out and protects them from pathogens. Cilia beat the mucus towards the exterior of your body, clearing debris – including viruses! – out of your lungs. Cilia cells were the preferred hosts of SARS-CoV, and are likely the preferred hosts of the new coronavirus. When these cells die, they slough off into your airways, filling them with debris and fluid. Symptoms include a fever, cough, and breathing difficulties. Many of those infected get pneumonia in both their lungs.
Enter the immune system. Immune cells recognize the virus and flood into the lungs. The lung tissue becomes inflamed. During normal immune function, the inflammatory process is highly regulated and is confined to infected areas. However, sometimes the immune system overreacts, and this results in damage to healthy tissue. More cells die and slough off into the lungs, further clogging them and worsening the pneumonia.
As damage to the lungs increases, stage three begins, potentially resulting in respiratory failure. Patients that reach this stage of infection can incur permanent lung damage or even die. We see the same lesions in the lungs of those infected by the novel coronavirus as those with SARS. SARS creates holes in the lungs, so they look honeycomb-like. This is probably due to the aforementioned over-reactive immune response, which affects tissue both infected and healthy and creates scars that stiffen the lungs. As such, some patients may require ventilators to aid breathing.
The inflammation also results in more permeable alveoli. This is the location of the thin interface of gas exchange, where your lungs replace carbon dioxide in your blood with fresh oxygen you just inhaled. Increased permeability causes fluid to leak into the lungs. This decreases the lungs’ ability to oxygenate blood, and in severe cases, floods them so that you become unable to breathe. Sometimes, this can be fatal.
The immune system’s over-reaction can also cause another kind of damage. Proteins called cytokines are the immune system’s alarm system, recruiting immune cells to the infection site. Over-production of cytokines can result in a cytokine storm, where there is large-scale inflammation in the body. Blood vessels become more permeable and fluid seeps out. This makes it difficult for blood and oxygen to reach the rest of the body and can result in multi-organ failure. This has happened in the most severe cases of CoVid-19. Although there are no specific treatments for coronaviruses, symptoms can be treated through supportive care. Also, vaccines are currently in development.
What can you do to protect yourself from CoVid-19? Basic protocol comes down to regular hand washing, avoiding close contact with anyone coughing or sneezing, avoiding unnecessary contact with animals, washing hands after contact with animals, thoroughly cooking meat and eggs prior to consumption, and covering your mouth and nose while coughing or sneezing. Respiratory viruses are typically transmitted via droplets in sneezes or coughs of those infected, so preventing their travel stops the spread of disease.

Alveoli model from:
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Recognizing Day to Day Signs and Symptoms of Coronavirus

DAY TO DAY SYMPTOMS OF COVID-19
Before proceeding, please note that this general overview is compiled for initial self-assessment only and may vary for each individual. If you're not feeling well, you should immediately consult a medical practitioner to have an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of COVID-19.
The typical daily symptoms are concluded from the study of 138 patients at Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University and another study involving 135 patients from Jinyintan Hospital and 56 patients from Wuhan Pulmonary Hospital.
These symptoms are broken down into:
DAY 1 TO DAY 2
The beginning symptoms are similar to the common cold with a mild sore throat and neither having a fever nor feeling tired. Patients can still consume food and drink as usual.
DAY 3
The patient's throats start to feel a bit painful. Body temperature reads at around 36.5° celsius. Although it's uncommon, other symptoms like mild nausea, vomiting or mild diarrhea are possible to set in.
DAY 4
Throat pain becomes more serious. Other symptoms like feeling weak and joint pain start to manifest. The patient may show a temperature reading between 36.5° to 37° celsius.
DAY 5 TO 6
Mild fever starts. The patients show a temperature reading above 37.2° celsius. The second most common symptom, dry cough, also appears. Dyspnea or breathing difficulty may occur occasionally. Most patients in this stage are easily feeling tired. Other symptoms remain about the same. These four symptoms are among the top five key indications of COVID-19 according to the final report of the initial outbreak conducted by the joint mission of China and WHO.
DAY 7
The patients that haven't started recovering by day 7 get more serious coughs and breathing difficulty. Fever can get higher up to 38° celsius. Patients may develop further headache and body pain or worsening diarrhea if there’s any. Many patients are admitted to the hospital at this stage.
DAY 8 TO 9
On the 8th day, the symptoms are likely to be worsened for the patient who has coexisting medical conditions. Severe shortness of breath becomes more frequent. Temperature reading goes well above 38°. In one of the studies, day 9 is the average time when Sepsis starts to affect 40% of the patients.
DAY 10 TO 11
Doctors are ordering imaging tests like chest x-ray to capture the severity of respiratory distress in patients. Patients are having loss of appetite and may be facing abdominal pain. The condition also needs immediate treatment in ICU.
DAY 12 TO 14
For the survivors, the symptoms can be well-managed at this point. Fever tends to get better and breathing difficulties may start to cease on day 13. But Some patients may still be affected by mild cough even after hospital discharge.
DAY 15 TO 16
Day 15 is the opposite condition for the rest of the minority patients . The fragile group must prepare for the possibility of acute cardiac injury or kidney injury.
DAY 17 TO 19
COVID-19 fatality cases happen at around day 18. Before the time, vulnerable patients may develop a secondary infection caused by a new pathogen in the lower respiratory tract. The severe condition may then lead to a blood coagulation and ischemia.
DAY 20 TO 22
The surviving patients are recovered completely from the disease and are discharged from the hospital.

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#Coronavirus #WuhanCoronavirus #SignsandSymptomsCoronavirus #StayHome
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The Coronavirus Explained & What You Should Do

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A huge thanks to the experts who helped us on short notice with the video. Especially “Our World in Data”, the online publication for research and data on the world’s largest problems – and how to make progress solving them. Check out their site. It also includes a constantly updated page on the Corona Pandemic.

In December 2019 the Chinese authorities notified the world that a virus was spreading through their communities. In the following months it spread to other countries, with cases doubling within days. This virus is the “Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2”, that causes the disease called COVID19, and that everyone simply calls Coronavirus.

What actually happens when it infects a human and what should we all do?

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How Contagious is COVID-19? (Transmission, Spread, and R0)

Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 occurs via droplet transmission, contact transmission, and aerosol transmission. Droplet transmission occurs when respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes are inhaled by a person nearby. Contact transmission occurs when a person touches a contaminated surface and then their mouth, nose, or eyes. Aerosol transmission occurs when respiratory droplets containing the virus mix into the air and then are inhaled. COVID-19 is stable for up to 24 hours on cardboard, 2-3 days on plastic and stainless steel and up to three hours in aerosols, which include fog, mist, dust, air pollutants, and smoke. Therefore, it is possible to get infected by touching contaminated objects or through the air.
The incubation period is the time between infection and symptom onset for an illness. Estimates for COVID-19’s incubation period vary from 2-14 days, but it is generally assumed to be around 5 days. There is more debate about the latent period, which is the time between infection and infectiousness. It is now thought that people can be infectious before showing symptoms, and so the latent period is shorter than the incubation period.
An imported case occurs when a traveler is infected in one area and is reported as sick in another area. Local transmission occurs if that traveler infects others, or if there is a cluster of cases locally and the spread is easily traced. Community transmission occurs when there is no clear source of infection.
Infectivity can be measured using R0. R0 is important epidemiology jargon, short for reproduction number. It is the number of cases, on average, that an infected person will cause during their infectious period. So if R0 =2, then an infected person will infect an average of 2 other people while they are infectious. There are two important variants of the R0. The basic reproduction number represents the maximum potential of a pathogen to infect people – basically what would happen if an infectious person entered a community with no prior immunity. The effective reproductive number describes the current vulnerability of a population based on whether people have immunity thanks to vaccination or prior exposure. The effective R0 decreases over the course of the outbreak. Note that both basic and effective reproduction number depend on factors such as environment and demographics in addition to the pathogen’s infectiousness. The goal of public health interventions is to bring R0 down to less than 1, as this would cause the disease to die out over time.
The seasonal flu has an R0 ranging from 0.9 – 2.1. There is a lot of debate about the R0 of COVID-19, with estimates from more recent data ranging from 2.7-4.2. The variance in these estimates is largely due to differing model assumptions and a lack of data. For example, models which assume the possibility of being infectious before symptom onset have estimates that are around 0.5 higher.
These high R0 estimates mean there is much greater potential for spread of COVID-19 than for the flu. How much greater? For the purpose of this example, let’s say that the flu has an R0 of 1.5 and COVID-19 has an R0 of 3. After three cycles of infection, 11 people have had the flu, and 40 people have been infected with COVID-19. After ten cycles of infection, this becomes 171 people with the flu, and over 88,000 people with COVID-19.

3D Models from:

How COVID-19 Affects the Body

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COVID-19 is the short name for the disease known as novel coronavirus disease 2019. Coronaviruses are a large group of similar viruses. Some are known to infect humans, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The one that causes COVID-19 is called SARS-CoV-2. All coronaviruses are named for the crown-like “spikes” that cover their surface, called spike, or “S,” proteins. Inside the virus, genetic material, called RNA, is made up of genes. Genes carry the information to make more copies of the virus. The virus can infect you if it enters your mouth, nose, or lungs. Inside your body, the S protein of the virus locks to a receptor on the surface of one of your cells. This can trigger the virus to enter the cell in a couple of ways. It may cause the virus to fuse with the cell surface, then release its genes into the cell. Or, the cell may pull the virus inside by enclosing it in a sac. Once inside, the virus can fuse to the sac and release its genes. Next, the genes use a structure in your cell, called a ribosome, to make new copies of the virus. The new viruses travel to the surface of the cell. There, they can leave to infect more cells. In the meantime, viral S proteins left on the surface of the infected cell can cause it to fuse with nearby healthy cells, forming a giant cell. This may be another way for the virus to spread between cells. People may be infected with COVID-19 for two to fourteen days before symptoms appear. The three main symptoms of COVID-19 are: a fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Other symptoms may include: tiredness, body aches, stuffy nose, sore throat, diarrhea and vomiting, loss of appetite, and loss of smell. Most people have a mild illness and can recover at home. Some people who have the virus may not get sick at all or may show no symptoms. But, if you have trouble breathing, or any other symptoms that are severe, call your doctor or the emergency room. They will tell you what to do. For most people who have the virus, the risk for serious illness is thought to be low. People sixty-five years and older may have a higher risk for serious illness. And, people of any age may be at high-risk if they have underlying conditions, such as: chronic lung disease or asthma; serious heart conditions; diabetes; severe obesity; chronic kidney disease, and liver disease. High-risk groups also include people with a weakened immune system, including: those on certain medications, such as corticosteroids; people in cancer treatment; and those with HIV or AIDS. Even if you aren’t in a high-risk group, it’s important to practice social distancing, which means keeping at least two meters, or six feet, between you and other people. This helps prevent infections and serious illness in others as well as yourself. For up-to-date information about COVID-19 and other ways to prevent its spread, visit the CDC website.

ANH20236|

3D Animation: SARS-CoV-2 virus transmission leading to COVID-19

Thanks to the brilliant team at Helix Animation for this 3D animation outlining the most common ways of transmitting the coronavirus SARS=CoV-2 based on the latest relevant scientific research available (March 2020).

Please note that the knowledge of this infectious disease and its transmission, as well as on this novel coronavirus, is still incomplete and evolving. Facts may change over time as the outbreak is ongoing with the latest updates found at:

As typical for 3D visualizations, the overall virus representation is an artistic depiction, and the surface proteins density and distribution have been simplified, in order the entire audience to easily grasp the most prominent features of this virus.

In light of the united global effort, we would like to provide free usage of this video and/or any of the imagery shown, as long as it is properly credited (including the logo and the full text in the lower left corner). Thus, if you’d like to use it, please drop us a line via our contact section at (Video/Imagery Usage) and we’ll get back to you with the video/imagery files.

How Community Spread Happens Fast - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Updated 4-7-2020

Justin, a millennial, brings a box of donuts to the office and unknowingly spreads the coronavirus to his colleagues who further spread throughout the community. A motion graphic animation to show how healthy people are so crucial in curbing the spread and how community spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19) occurs - sometimes unknowingly by seemingly healthy people spreading the disease rapidly in socially dense environments.

Coronavirus Animation: High Impact Demonstrates How COVID-19 Impacts the Body

Coronavirus, which causes COVID-19, originated in the city of Wuhan, China, and has since spread across the globe at an alarming rate. We produced this 3D coronavirus animation to show how COVID-19 is believed to be transmitted while educating the public on the symptoms that may be caused by COVID-19.

Most people who contract COVID-19 experience mild symptoms, such as sore throat, headache, fever, a dry cough, shortness of breath, and fatigue. However, in a subset of patients, the virus attacks the lungs, causing a more serious infection, such as pneumonia.

Small air sacs in the lungs add oxygen to your blood cell. This oxygen is then transported to organs and tissues throughout the body. When the coronavirus attaches to a cell, it begins to replicate within the cell.

The body’s immune system attempts to destroy the virus, which results in an inflammatory response that causes fluid accumulation in the lungs. As the lungs fill with fluid, the body’s available oxygen decreases, which can lead to organ injury and death.

The risk of serious complications increases if a person is elderly or has associated medical conditions. Once infected, a person may show no symptoms, but can still infect others.
What began in Wuhan has now spread across the globe as international efforts to contain the virus and minimize its spread to the larger population continue.

Follow the World Health Organization for updates about the international spread of Coronavirus and how to protect yourself from COVID-19:


Follow the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to learn how the coronavirus outbreak is currently spreading across the United States, and recommendations for improving your safety and resilience.


If you are currently leading government or private efforts to combat the coronavirus outbreak and you think our visualizations could help in your mission to educate the public or relevant stakeholders about this virus, we encourage you to visit our website, view some of our medical work, and reach out to learn how we can help.

Coronavirus outbreak (covid 19) explained through 3D Medical Animation

This video is available in different language subtitles English, Korean (
Our dedicated microsite-
The 2019 nCoV Novel Coronavirus is fast threatening to become a pandemic. This 3D medical animation explains the story so far, covering what is a pandemic, current rates of infection and tips to protect against infections. It also delves into the biology and mechanism of action MoA that coronavirus uses to infect and destroy human cells. Though the exact MoA for this coronavirus is not known.

Check back daily for more information as it develops. Alternatively, see our website: , or our dedicated microsite above. The PDF in the video is available for free download also. It is provided under a Wiki CC4.0 creative commons license.

For those of you leading government or private institutions or in the medical community , and if you think our visualizations can help in any way, please feel free to reach out.

Also, any voice over artists, translators, that can offer to support our effort, please contact us on info@scientificanimations.com .

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Understanding the Virus that Causes COVID-19, Animation

Overview of coronavirus family, origin of SARS-CoV-2, viral structure and life cycle, pathophysiology. This video is available for instant download licensing here :
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Voice by: Ashley Fleming
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All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
Coronaviruses are a large family of enveloped, RNA viruses. There are 4 groups of coronaviruses: alpha and beta, originated from bats and rodents; and gamma and delta, originated from avian species. Coronaviruses are responsible for a wide range of diseases in many animals, including livestock and pets. In humans, they were thought to cause mild, self-limiting respiratory infections until 2002, when a beta-coronavirus crossed species barriers from bats to a mammalian host, before jumping to humans, causing the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, SARS, epidemic. More recently, another beta-coronavirus is responsible for the serious Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, MERS, started in 2012. The novel coronavirus responsible for the Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic, COVID-19, is also a beta-coronavirus. The genome of the virus is fully sequenced and appears to be most similar to a strain in bats, suggesting that it also originated from bats. The virus is also very similar to the SARS-coronavirus and is therefore named SARS-coronavirus 2, SARS-CoV 2. At the moment, it’s not yet clear if the virus jumped directly from bats to humans, or if there is a mammalian intermediate host.
Coronavirus genome is a large, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA molecule that contains all information necessary for the making of viral components. The RNA is coated with structural proteins, forming a complex known as nucleocapsid. The nucleocapsid is enclosed in an envelope, which is basically a LIPID membrane with embedded proteins. From the envelope, club-like spikes emanate, giving the appearance of a crown. This is where the “corona” name came from.
The integrity of the envelope is essential for viral infection, and is the Achilles’ heel of the virus, because the lipid membrane can easily be destroyed by lipid solvents such as detergents, alcohol and some disinfectants. In fact, enveloped viruses are the easiest to inactivate when they are outside a host.
In order to infect a host cell, the spikes of the virus must BIND to a molecule on the cell surface, called a receptor. The specificity of this binding explains why viruses are usually species specific – they have receptors in certain species, and not others. Host jumping is usually triggered by mutations in spike proteins which change them in a way that they now can bind to a receptor in a new species.
The novel coronavirus appears to use the same receptor as SARS-coronavirus for entry to human cells, and that receptor is the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, ACE2. Infection usually starts with cells of the respiratory mucosa, then spreads to epithelial cells of alveoli in the lungs.
Receptor binding is followed by fusion of the viral membrane with host cell membrane, and the release of nucleocapsid into the cell. The virus then uses the host machinery to replicate, producing viral RNAs and proteins. These are then assembled into new viral particles, called virions, by budding into intracellular membranes. The new virions are released and the host cell dies.
Uncontrolled growth of the virus destroys respiratory tissues, producing symptoms. Infection triggers the body’s inflammatory response, which brings immune cells to the site to fight the virus. While inflammation is an important defense mechanism, it may become excessive and cause damage to the body’s own tissues, contributing to the severity of the disease. In an otherwise healthy person, there is a good chance that the virus is eventually eliminated and the patient recovers, although some may require supportive treatments. On the other hand, people with weakened immune system or underlying chronic diseases may progress to severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome, which can be fatal.

Corona Virus Disease / COVID-19: Sahi aur Galath coronavirus disease ke baare me ( HINDI ) - Part 1

How to Obtain a Nasopharyngeal Swab Specimen for COVID-19 suspected patients
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Corona Virus Disease / COVID-19: Facts and figures for Public Awareness

How COVID-19 Spreads
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Person-to-person spread
The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.
These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Can someone spread the virus without being sick?
People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest).
Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with this new coronavirus, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.
Spread from contact with contaminated surfaces or objects
It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

How easily the virus spreads
How easily a virus spreads from person-to-person can vary. Some viruses are highly contagious (spread easily), like measles, while other viruses do not spread as easily. Another factor is whether the spread is sustained, spreading continually without stopping.

Respirators
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Should I wear a respirator in public?
CDC does not recommend the routine use of respirators outside of workplace settings (in the community). Most often, spread of respiratory viruses from person-to-person happens among close contacts (within 6 feet). CDC recommends everyday preventive actions to prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, such as avoiding people who are sick, avoiding touching your eyes or nose, and covering your cough or sneeze with a tissue. People who are sick should stay home and not go into crowded public places or visit people in hospitals. Workers who are sick should follow CDC guidelines and stay home when they are sick.
What is a respirator?
A respirator is a personal protective device that is worn on the face or head and covers at least the nose and mouth. A respirator is used to reduce the wearer’s risk of inhaling hazardous airborne particles (including infectious agents), gases or vapors. Respirators, including those intended for use in healthcare settings, are certified by the CDC/NIOSH.
What is an N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR)?
An N95 FFR is a type of respirator which removes particles from the air that are breathed through it. These respirators filter out at least 95% of very small (0.3 micron) particles. N95 FFRs are capable of filtering out all types of particles, including bacteria and viruses.

Checklist to Get Ready
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As a family, you can plan and make decisions now that will protect you and your family during a COVID-19 outbreak.

Stay informed and in touch
Get up-to-date information about local COVID-19 activity from public health officials
Ask your neighbors what their plan includes.
Create a list of local organizations you and your household can contact in case you need access to information, healthcare services, support, and resources.
Create an emergency contact list including family, friends, neighbors, carpool drivers, healthcare providers, teachers, employers, the local public health department, and other community resources.
Prepare for possible illness
Consider members of the household that may be at greater risk such as older adults and people with severe chronic illnesses.
Choose a room in your house that can be used to separate sick household members from others.
Take everyday preventive steps
Wash your hands frequently
Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
Stay home when you are sick.
Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces Be prepared if your child’s school or childcare facility is temporarily dismissed or for potential changes at your workplace.

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How does Coronavirus affect our lungs?

We spoke to Professor Debby Bogaert, Scottish Senior Clinical Fellow and Honorary Consultant in paediatric infectious diseases at the University of Edinburgh about the effect of COVID-19 on our respiratory system.

To contact The Physiological Society:
pressoffice@physoc.org

Transcript
COVID-19 is a respiratory illness caused by a new type of coronavirus, but what is the respiratory system and how is it affected by COVID-19? We spoke to Professor Debby Bogaert, Scottish Senior Clinical Fellow and Honorary Consultant in paediatric infectious diseases at Edinburgh University.

Our respiratory system is a series of organs responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide, also known as gas exchange. Professor Bogaert told us that when we become infected with COVID-19, it can cause an infection of part of this respiratory system known as the respiratory tree, which is found in our lungs. The respiratory tree, also called the bronchial tree, is a name given to the branch-like structure in our lungs which includes the bronchi right down to the tiny air sacs called alveoli. Professor Bogaert goes on to say that when we contract COVID-19 the lining of the respiratory tree typically becomes damaged, irritating the nerves in the lining of the airway, and causing that dry cough we’ve heard about. However for a small number of people, the infection can cause more severe problems by affecting what’s known as ‘gas exchange’. Gas exchange happens around the alveoli, those tiny air sacs at the tips of the respiratory tree - oxygen passes into the blood and carbon dioxide passes from the blood into the alveoli and is then exhaled - Professor Bogaert says that if COVID-19 affects this process, our body becomes less able to take on oxygen and get rid of carbon dioxide over time, and some people will need a ventilator to help them breathe.

Global COVID-19 Prevention

This short animated video from Stanford Medicine's Maya Adam illustrates how the novel coronavirus — the virus that causes the respiratory disease COVID-19 — is transmitted among people and how transmission can be prevented.

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Created by: Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown

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COVID-19 Animation

COVID-19 Animation

In this video we will talk about the following topics:
1. What is the difference between SARS-CoV-2, 2019-nCoV and COVID-19?
2. Why is SARS-CoV-2 different from other Coronaviruses?
3. Why is social distancing important?

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Don`t forget: #stayhome #staysafe #COVID19pandemic

COVID-19 animation: Coronavirus and antibody testing explained

There are two kinds of tests for viruses like COVID-19. One tests for the presence of the virus in the sample, and the other for antibodies to the virus. Both are important for understanding who is infected and might transmit the virus to others, who have had the virus and might now be immune, and even who might potentially help others with treatment.

What happens when you're infected with the COVID-19 coronavirus? | DW News

The vast majority of patients with the new coronavirus recover successfully without needing serious medical attention. So how many people recover – and what helps?
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Medical Animation explaining Coronavirus Mechanism of Action - How Coronavirus attacks a human body

our latest video-
While the exact mechanism of action for the 2019 Novel Coronavirus is still unknown, the 3D structure has been published; This structure shows that the virus is very similar to other coronaviruses and so we show the mechanism of action of how coronavirus gains cell entry, coopts the human cell into producing copies of itself, and causes apoptosis or cell death.

For more info on the biology, the spread and the response to 2019 nCoV see our microsite:


The 3D ribbon structure was taken from Innophore who have created the structure based on the genome sequencing data published by Chinese researchers. You can find it here:

Symptoms of Coronavirus | COVID-19 | #aumsum #kids #science #education #children

Novel coronavirus or 2019-nCoV is a new strain of coronavirus which was first detected in Wuhan, China in December 2019.
The disease caused by novel coronavirus is named as COVID-19.
Fever, tiredness and dry cough are the most common symptoms of COVID-19. Some infected people may also experience aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea.
Symptoms of COVID-19 are usually mild and begin gradually. Also surprisingly, some infected people don't even develop symptoms and don't feel unwell.
It is estimated that more than 80% of people recover without the need of special treatment. But it is also estimated that 1 out of 6 people suffering from COVID-19 will become seriously ill and will develop difficulty breathing. Also, people with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes as well as older people are more likely to develop serious illness.
It is advised by WHO that people with fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention.

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