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Cell Division

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Mitosis: The Amazing Cell Process that Uses Division to Multiply! (Updated)

Updated Mitosis Video. The Amoeba Sisters walk you through the reason for mitosis with mnemonics for prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. Expand details to see table of contents.👇 Video handout here:

Table of Contents:
Why is Mitosis Important? 0:44
Why Don't You Want Cells Dividing all the Time? 2:00
Interphase (occurs before mitosis) 2:23
DNA and Chromosomes 2:55
Chromosome Replication 4:07
PMAT Mitosis Stages 5:30
Cytokinesis (actual splitting of cell) 7:30

We appreciate the feedback we get for what we need to clarify or should have added. Here is a clarification (also pinned in comments): (1) We mention mitosis as a type of cell division. To be specific, it's a division happening within the cell - in the nucleus. But we do not introduce the nucleus until later on in video. Mitosis is specifically the division happening of the nucleus whereas cytokinesis follows to do the actual splitting of the cell (mentioned at 7:30). (2) Our video is intended to focus on animal cells (as drawn) - specifically human cells - as we use human chromosome numbers. We wish we had clarified that more as we appreciate the feedback that the statements, Mitosis makes body cells. Meiosis makes gametes. has some big exceptions such as plants. (3) In metaphase, we do not draw a nucleus (6:09), because we mention it already has been disassembled. Disassembly of the nuclear membrane (envelope) occurs at the end of the previous stage. Many texts will state this is during prometaphase, a stage in between prophase and metaphase. In this short video, we do not include prometaphase. We only mention that the nucleus is no longer there by the time it's metaphase. (4) Notice our illustration in anaphase also includes a text box that says sister chromatids separate at 6:37. It's important to understand that chromosomes are moved away in anaphase, but as the text box notes, realize they are separated by the pulling apart of sister chromatids. This is especially important when comparing mitosis to meiosis I---as you can see our comparison video (which has more detail) here:

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The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching biology at the high school level. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit:

We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook:

We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines and YouTube's policy center We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language.

Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library

We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages. YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are thankful for those that contribute different languages. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
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Cell Cycle and Mitosis [3D Animation]

Cell Cycle and Mitosis animation
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cell division of meiosis and mitosis

meiosis cell division in plant and animal.
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Cell cycle phases | Cells | MCAT | Khan Academy

Learn about the different seasons of a cell's life and how it grows with time. By Raja Narayan. Visit us ( for health and medicine content or ( for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video.

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The Cell Cycle (and cancer) [Updated]

Explore the cell cycle with the Amoeba Sisters and an important example of when it is not controlled: cancer. We have an Unlectured resource for this topic: Expand video details for table of contents. 👇 Video also mentions cell cycle checkpoints and cell cycle control.

Table of Contents:
1:00 Cell Growth and Cell Reproduction
1:42 Cancer (explaining uncontrolled cell growth)
3:27 Cell Cycle
5:26 Cell Cycle Checkpoints
6:48 Cell Cycle Regulation
8:16 G0 Phase of Cell Cycle

Vocabulary in this video includes the words apoptosis, G1, S, G2, mitosis, and cytokinesis. Positive regulator proteins such as cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases are briefly mentioned as well as a negative regulator protein p53.

Positive and negative regulation reference regarding cyclin types and cyclin rise/fall areas [in humans]:
OpenStax, Biology. OpenStax CNX.

Are you interested in how blood supply to cancer cells may differ from blood supply to healthy cells? Learn more in this Further Reading:

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Our FREE resources:
GIFs:
Handouts:
Comics:

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Website:
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The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching biology at the high school level. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit:


We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook:

We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines and YouTube's policy center We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language.

Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library

We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages, and we are thankful for those that contribute different languages! YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are not affiliated with any of the translated subtitle credits that YouTube may place below. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.

Mitosis: Splitting Up is Complicated - Crash Course Biology #12

Hank describes mitosis and cytokinesis - the series of processes our cells go through to divide into two identical copies.

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References for this video can be found in the Google document here:

Table of Contents
1. Mitosis 0:24
2. Interphase 3:27
a) Chromatin 3:37
b) Centrosomes 3:52
3) Prophase 4:14
a) Chromosomes 4:18
b) Chromatid 4:31
c) Microtubules 5:07
4) Metaphase 5:22
a) Motor Proteins 5:36
5) Biolography 6:13
6) Anaphase 9:00
7) Telophase 9:15
8) Cleavage 9:25
9) Cytokinesis 9:36

This video contains the following sounds from Freesound.org:
Swishes.wav by Pogotron
Opening Scotch Whisky.mp3 by Percy Duke

crashcourse, biology, mitosis, cell biology, cell division, cell, replication, splitting, chromosome, diploid cells, nucleus, DNA, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, interphase, chromatin, chromatid, centrosome duplication, centromere, microtubules, motor protein, walter flemming, tomomi kiyomitsu, dynein, cleavage, cytokinesis, daughter cells, science, education, college, university, learn, teach, hank green Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Cell Division

Paul Andersen explains how cells duplicate through the process of cell division. Prokaryotic cells (like bacteria) duplicate through a process of binary fission. Eukaryotic cells (like you) duplicate body cells through mitosis and create sex cells through meiosis.

Intro Music Atribution
Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav
Artist: CosmicD
Link to sound:
Creative Commons Atribution License

All images are either Public Domain or Creative Commons Attribution Licenses:
Egelberg. English: Dividing Cells Imaged by Quantitative Phase Contrast Microscopy Using the HoloMonitor M3 from Phase Holographic Imaging., November 5, 2012. Own work.
File:Binary Fission.png. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed March 1, 2013.
File:Eukaryota Diversity 2.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed March 1, 2013.
File:Major Events in Mitosis.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed March 1, 2013.
File:Meiosis Overview.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed March 1, 2013.
File:PhageExterior.svg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed March 1, 2013.
File:Sperm-egg.jpg. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed March 1, 2013.
File:Three Cell Growth Types.png. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, November 23, 2012.
Mattosaurus. English: These Are e Coli., August 4, 2009. Own work.
Ungerer, Bernhard. English: 3D Render of a Male Skeleton with Body Shape in Three Views. Resolution: 1600 x 1200 Px, 150 Dpi., June 22, 2008. Own work.

Cell Cycle (Overview, Interphase)



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mitosis 3d animation |Phases of mitosis|cell division

Phases of mitosis:This animation demonstrates the stages of mitosis in an animal cell.

Mitosis is the process in which a eukaryotic cell nucleus splits in two, followed by division of the parent cell into two daughter cells. The word mitosis means threads, and it refers to the threadlike appearance of chromosomes as the cell prepares to divide. Early microscopists were the first to observe these structures, and they also noted the appearance of a specialized network of microtubules during mitosis. These tubules, collectively known as the spindle, extend from structures called centrosomes — with one centrosome located at each of the opposite ends, or poles, of a cell. As mitosis progresses, the microtubules attach to the chromosomes, which have already duplicated their DNA and aligned across the center of the cell. The spindle tubules then shorten and move toward the poles of the cell. As they move, they pull the one copy of each chromosome with them to opposite poles of the cell. This process ensures that each daughter cell will contain one exact copy of the parent cell DNA.


Interphase: Cells may appear inactive during this stage, but they are quite the opposite. This is the longest period of the complete cell cycle during which DNA replicates, the centrioles divide, and proteins are actively produced. For a complete description of the events during Interphase, read about the Cell Cycle.

Prophase: During this first mitotic stage, the nucleolus fades and chromatin (replicated DNA and associated proteins) condenses into chromosomes. Each replicated chromosome comprises two chromatids, both with the same genetic information. Microtubules of the cytoskeleton, responsible for cell shape, motility and attachment to other cells during interphase, disassemble. And the building blocks of these microtubules are used to grow the mitotic spindle from the region of the centrosomes.

Prometaphase: In this stage the nuclear envelope breaks down so there is no longer a recognizable nucleus. Some mitotic spindle fibers elongate from the centrosomes and attach to kinetochores, protein bundles at the centromere region on the chromosomes where sister chromatids are joined. Other spindle fibers elongate but instead of attaching to chromosomes, overlap each other at the cell center.

Metaphase: Tension applied by the spindle fibers aligns all chromosomes in one plane at the center of the cell.

Anaphase: Spindle fibers shorten, the kinetochores separate, and the chromatids (daughter chromosomes) are pulled apart and begin moving to the cell poles.

Telophase: The daughter chromosomes arrive at the poles and the spindle fibers that have pulled them apart disappear.

Cytokinesis: The spindle fibers not attached to chromosomes begin breaking down until only that portion of overlap is left. It is in this region that a contractile ring cleaves the cell into two daughter cells. Microtubules then reorganize into a new cytoskeleton for the return to interphase.

Cell Division and the Cell Cycle

This dramatic video choreographed to powerful music introduces the viewer/student to the wonder and miracle of the cell division and cell cycle. It is designed as a motivational trailer to be shown by Biology, Biochemistry and Life Science teachers in middle and high school and college as a visual Introduction to this miracle of life. As a high school Biology teacher myself, I have found this video to truly inspire my students to want to learn more about the topic.

Please rate this video and feel free to comment. If you like it, please help me spread the word by posting links on your media websites. The more students who can enjoy these dramatic videos, the better!

To view all of my videos in Biology, Earth Science, and Astronomy, subscribe to my channel at: I will be releasing new videos periodically.

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The music is Pure Spirit of the Forest from the movie, Avatar.

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MITOSIS, CYTOKINESIS, AND THE CELL CYCLE

The only way to create a new cell is to duplicate a pre-existing one. The original cell is called the parent cell, and the two new cells, which are genetically identical, are called daughter cells. The series of steps leading to and involving the duplication of a cell is called the cell cycle. The cell cycle involves cell growth, chromosome replication, chromosome segregation, and cell division, which take place over the course of the four sequential phases of the cell cycle: G1, S, G2, and M. The first three phases are together called interphase.
Taking place between G1 and G2, S phase is when DNA replicates and chromosomes duplicate. It is critical that this replication is accurate, and that every nucleotide is copied exactly once.
Mitosis has 5 stages: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.
During prophase, chromosomes condense within the nucleus, with each chromosome consisting of two linked sister chromatids. Outside the nucleus, the mitotic spindle assembles between two centrosomes. Next we have prometaphase, which begins when the nuclear envelope breaks down. This means that chromosomes can now attach to spindle microtubules. This occurs via kinetochores and results in the movement of the chromosomes. Metaphase involves the alignment of chromosomes along the equator of the spindle, with microtubules attaching sister chromatids to opposite poles of the spindle. Anaphase involves the synchronized separation of sister chromatids to form two daughter chromosomes, which are pulled towards the spindle poles. During this process, not only do the kinetochore microtubules shorten, but the spindle poles also move apart. Telophase is the last stage of mitosis. At this point, the two sets of daughter chromosomes arrive at the spindle poles and decondense. The Initiationformation of the two nuclei, which occurs when a nuclear envelope assembles around the two genomes, means that mitosis is over.
Cytokinesis, which is the division of the cytoplasm, occurs during mitosis. It occurs thanks to the formation of a contractile ring of actin and myosin filaments, which form a rapidly deepening furrow. The contractile ring begins to assemble during anaphase, just beneath the plasma membrane. As the ring contracts, there is formation of an intercellular bridge and fusion of intracellular vesicles to add more plasma membrane to compensate for the extra surface area. At the center of the intercellular bridge, there is what is called the midbody, which consists of the remains of the interdigitated interpolar microtubules at the spindle midzone, which are packed together within a dense matrix material. Abscission is the final cleaving of the two daughter cells. So cytokinesis has 4 steps: initiation, contraction, membrane insertion, and completion.

Cell Cycle Regulation:


Cytoskeleton:

CELL CYCLE AND CELL DIVISION (EASY WAY) / NCERT/ PART 1

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CELL CYCLE AND CELL DIVISION (EASY WAY) / NCERT/ PART 1

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Cell Division & Cell Cycle (Hindi): Mitosis, Meiosis, Amitosis

In this Lecture, we'll study the whole process of cell division which is also called the cell cycle.
In the next lectures of the cell division, we'll study each type of cell division in detail (Mitosis, Meiosis and Amitosis)
We'll cover everything in detail according to the ICSE & CBSE Syllabus.

#CellDivision #CellCycle #CellDivisionHindi
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Background music credits: High by Lyfo -

GCSE Science Biology (9-1) Cell division by Mitosis

Find my revision workbooks here:

In this video, we start by looking at chromosomes. We then explore the cell-cycle involving mitosis and why this is important.

Image credits: All images were created by and are the property of Autonomy Education Ltd.

Biology Meiosis cell division

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Real Microscopic Mitosis ( MRC )

Actual Footage of Cell Division (Kidney Cells)

Regrading your question: one cell dividing into 3 cells. It's actually dividing into 2 cells and not 3 cells, except that one of the daughter cells will have two nuclei instead of one nucleus, hence we call them binucleated cells. If you watch the video carefully, you'll notice that too. How does it happen? Some cells contain three or more centrioles (these are cylindrical organelles involved in the development of spindle fibres during cell division), resulting in multiple poles. This leads to the cells pulling chromosomes in many directions that end in multiple nuclei found in one cell.

Learn more:



Animation How the Cell Cycle Works

Mitosis (Somatic Cell Division)

How Do Cells Divide - Phases Of Mitosis - What Is Cell Division - The Cell Cycle - Cellular Division

In this video we discuss how do cells divide and what is the cell cycle. We cover the different phases of cell division, and what takes place during each of these phases.


Transcript/notes

Cell division

There are 2 types of cell division in the body, mitosis and meiosis. Meiosis occurs in the sex cells, egg cells in females, and sperm cells in men. And mitosis the type of cell division that occurs in all other cells in the body. In this video we are going to cover mitosis.

Cell division occurs when a parent cell divides to produce 2 daughter cells. Cell division is important in tissue growth, tissue repair caused by some sort of trauma or disease, and replacement of dying or old cells.

The cell-division cycle has 2 major phases, interphase and the mitotic phase. We will use the chart on the screen to go through this process.

During interphase the cell prepares for division, there are 3 sections in interphase; G1 phase, S phase and G2 phase.

During the G1 phase, cells produce new organelles, increase the supply of proteins and the centrioles begin replicating to eventually produce 2 new pairs.

During the S phase, DNA replication takes place. The DNA strands are unwound by DNA polymerase enzymes, free deoxyribonucleotides are paired up with the open DNA strands and the strands are returned to their coiled helix structure.

During the G2 phase, the centriole replication is completed and the cell continues to grow and prepare for division.

Once the interphase is complete, the M phase or mitotic phase will begin. There are 2 major events that take place in this phase, mitosis, which is the division of the nucleus and cytokinesis, which is division of the cytoplasm. These events overlap one another.

The M phase has 4 phases, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

During prophase chromatin, which is tightly packed DNA and protein, are further condensed to form chromosomes. Spindle fibers also begin to grow from the 2 centrioles pushing them apart to a point where they lie at opposite ends or poles of the cell. The nuclear membrane also disassembles which allows the chromosomes to be moved by the spindle fibers.

During metaphase some of the spindle fibers attatch to the centromeres of the chromosomes, aligning them in the middle of the cell at the equatorial plate.

During the 3rd stage, anaphase, the centromeres that held the sister chromatids together separate, and the sister chromatids are pulled by the spindle fibers toward the poles or ends of the cell. Each sister chromatid is now a chromosome with its own centromere. Cytokinesis also begins at this point.

During telophase, a new nuclear envelop forms around the chromosomes, a nucleolus reforms within the nucleus, the spindle fibers break up and disappear, the chromosomes uncoil to form chromatin and cytokinesis continues.

Once this is complete, 2 new daughter cells are formed and the process of cell division is complete.

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