This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Curiosity Mars Landing 2012

x

Terrifying Mars Landing - Mars Landing 2012

Landing the rover on the surface of Mars meant every stage had to work perfectly.

Subscribe to Discovery TV for more great space clips:


Follow Discovery on Twitter:
x

The Curiosity Rover Landing

Landing will take place the night of August 5th, 1:30 AM eastern, 10:30 pm pacific, and 6:30 AM GMT (August 6th.)

NASA will be streaming live here:

And we'll be live-tweeting here:

The Mars Science Laboratory or Curiosity Rover is the largest payload ever delivered to the surface of a planet and it has a terrifyingly complicated descent and landing strategy. First, the atmosphere takes it from 13,000 mph to 2,000 mph. Then a parachute takes it down to 200 mph. The final, powered-descent stage lowers the craft to 21 feet above the surface, at which point it will be lowered by a tether and the rockets will detach and crash land elsewhere.

If the Curiosity survives it's descent to Mars, it will be the most robust scientific tool to ever explore another planet. The size of a small car, the craft has a planned mission length of two years, during which time it could travel over 12 miles.

Curiosity's goals are to study the geology and climate of Mars, to determine whether there was once life there, and to prepare for future human exploration of the Red Planet.
x

NASA Lands Car-Size Rover Beside Martian Mountain

NASA's most advanced Mars rover Curiosity has landed on the Red Planet. The one-ton rover, hanging by ropes from a rocket backpack, touched down onto Mars Sunday to end a 36-week flight and begin a two-year investigation.

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft that carried Curiosity succeeded in every step of the most complex landing ever attempted on Mars, including the final severing of the bridle cords and flyaway maneuver of the rocket backpack.
x

Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover Animation

This 11-minute animation depicts key events of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, which will launch in late 2011 and land a rover, Curiosity, on Mars in August 2012.
x

Curiosity Rover - Mars Landing 2012

The Curiosity rover is the most ambitious Martian landing craft yet, it can work as a geochemist with the ability to take sophisticated rock samples and send the results back to Earth.

Subscribe to Discovery TV for more great space clips:


Follow Discovery on Twitter:

NASA's Mars Curiosity Rover Report #15 -- November 15, 2012

A NASA's Mars Curiosity rover team member gives an update on developments and status of the planetary exploration mission. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft delivered Curiosity to its target area on Mars at 1:31:45 a.m. EDT on Aug. 6, which includes the 13.8 minutes needed for confirmation of the touchdown to be radioed to Earth at the speed of light. The rover will conduct a nearly two-year prime mission to investigate whether the Gale Crater region of Mars ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life.

Mars Science Laboratory - Curiosity Rover - Mission Animation

This artist's concept animation depicts key events of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, which will launch in late 2011 and land a rover, Curiosity, on Mars in August 2012.

NASA Mars Rover Landing: Curiosity Lands, Beams Back Pictures of Mars Surface

Curiosity beamed back pictures from the surface showing its wheel and shadow.

*More:

The Stunning Images Of Mars: Curiosity Rover

The Stunning Images Of Mars: Curiosity Rover

This is the Curiosity rover. Designed initially to explore the crater Gale on Mars as part of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, Curiosity was launched from Cape Canaveral on November 26, 2011, and landed inside Gale on Mars on August 6, 2012.

The landing site of the car sized-rover was less than 1 ½” miles from its touchdown target after completing a 350 million mile journey. Its goal was to investigate Martian climate and geology and assess if environmental conditions were favorable for microbial life. It would also go on to conduct planetary habitability studies in preparation for human exploration of Mars.

Curiosity's two-year mission was would be extended indefinitely and continues to send back images and data to this day. This is a visual tour of its mission.


Image 2 -
This mosaic taken at the rover’s landing site in the Gale Crater was created by using 27 images from its mast-mounted Left Navigation Camera.

Image 3 -
Looking at Curiosity's landing site in color reveals the gravelly area surface of the Gale Crater. The terrain falls off into a depression and beyond that is the boulder-strewn, red-brown rim of a moderately-sized impact crater. Farther off in the distance, there are dark dunes and then the layered rock at the base of Mount Sharp.

Image 4 -
This image from the Mars Hand Lens Imager camera shows a small bright object on the ground beside the rover. The object is about half an inch long and the rover team believes this object to be debris from the spacecraft, possibly from the events of landing on Mars.

Image 5 -
This is the Shaler outcrop taken during the 120th day of Curiosity's mission. Its dramatically layering patterns suggested evidence of past streamflow in some locations.

Image 6 -
This is a view of the John Klein location selected for the first rock drilling by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity taken during the afternoon of the 153rd Martian day of Curiosity's mission. The veins giving rise to evidence of a wet past are common in the flat-lying rocks of the area.

Image 7 -
Called the mini drill test, Curiosity used its drill to generate this ring of powdered rock for inspection in advance of the rover's first full drilling. Curiosity performed the mini drill test during the 180th Martian day of its mission.

Image 8 -
This is Mount Sharp, also known as Aeolis Mons, its a layered mound in the center of Mars' Gale Crater, rising more than 3 miles above the floor of the Gale crater. Lower slopes of Mount Sharp were a major destination for the mission where it searched evidence of a past environment favorable for microbial life.

Image 9 -
This the view of an outcrop called Point Lake. The outcrop is about 20 inches high and pockmarked with holes. Curiosity recorded the 20 component images for this mosaic on the mission's 302nd Martian day.

Image 10 -
This scene combines seven images from the telephoto-lens camera onboard Curiosity. The images were taken on the 343rd Martian day of the mission. The rover had driven 205 feet the day before to arrive at the location providing this vista. The center of the scene is toward the southwest. A rise topped by two gray rocks near the center of the scene is informally named Twin Cairns Island.

Image 11 -
This mosaic of images are from geological members of the Yellowknife Bay formation, and the sites where Curiosity drilled into the lowest-lying member, called Sheepbed, at targets John Klein and Cumberland. The scene has the Sheepbed mudstone in the foreground and rises up through Gillespie Lake member to the Point Lake outcrop. These rocks record superimposed ancient lake and stream deposits that offered past environmental conditions favorable for microbial life. Rocks here were exposed about 70 million years ago by removal of overlying layers due to erosion by the wind.


Image 12 -
This scene combines images taken during the midafternoon of the mission's 526th Martian day. The sand dune in the upper center of the image spans a gap, called Dingo Gap, between two short scarps.

Image 13 -
This look back at a dune that the Curiosity drove across was taken during the 538th Martian day. The rover had driven over the dune three days earlier.


Image 14 -
The scene combines multiple images taken with both cameras of the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on Curiosity during its 1,087th Martian day. Taken at the lower slope of Mount Sharp and Spanning from the east, to the southwest it shows Large-scale crossbedding in the sandstone. This is a feature common in petrified sand dunes even on earth.


Image 15 -
Curiosity recorded this view of the sun setting at the close of the mission's 956th Martian day. This was the first sunset from the martian surfaced, observed in color by Curiosity.

NASA Mars Rover Landing: Curiosity Believed to Have Landed Successfully

NASA's $2.5 billion Curiosity rover has landed on the surface of the red planet.

*More:
x

NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover: '7 Minutes of Terror' Animation Video

NASA attempts to safely land Curiosity rover on surface of the red planet.

Related Story: Mars Rover On Final Approach for Landing Tonight

NASA's Mars Curiosity Rover closed in on its target today, all systems go for a landing on Mars late tonight (Monday morning at 1:31 a.m. EDT). If there's anxiety at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which controls the mission, one can understand.

Curiosity (the mission's formal name is Mars Science Laboratory) is the largest, most expensive and most ambitious Mars probe sent by the United States in a generation. It's been a decade in the making and ran up bills of $2.5 billion.

NASA is playing down expectations, but if the building blocks of life are buried in the Martian soil, Curiosity's miniature onboard chemistry laboratory is designed to pick them out.

Can we do this? Yeah, I think we can do this. I'm confident, Doug McCuistion, head of the Mars exploration program at NASA headquarters, said Saturday. We have the A-plus team on this. They've done everything possible to ensure success, but that risk still exists.

For more, click here:

Curiosity Rover Lands! - First Imagery From Mars | Video

The team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory celebrates after the successful touchdown of the Mars Science Laboratory on August 6th, 2012 EDT and acquisition of the first image from Curiosity on Mars.

7 Minutes of Terror: Curiosity Rover's Risky Mars Landing | Video

NASA's Curiosity rover is a 1-ton robot that will make an unprecedented Mars landing on Aug. 5, 2012. See how the risky maneuver will keep rover team members in suspense for 7 fateful minutes. VIDEO SHOW: Curiosity - The SUV of Mars Rovers:

Curiosity Has Landed

Relive the nail-biting terror and joy as NASA's Curiosity rover successfully landed on Mars the evening of Aug. 5 PDT (morning of Aug. 6 EDT). See and hear the team inside JPL mission control along with a visualization of the spacecraft's entry, descent and landing.

Mars Curiosity Rover Landing a Success — NASA Jubilant | National Geographic

August 6, 2012—Early Monday NASA scientists erupted with cheers, tears, and fist pumps at the successful completion of one of the most complicated spacecraft landings ever attempted.
➡ Subscribe:

About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

Get More National Geographic:
Official Site:
Facebook:
Twitter:
Instagram:

After carrying out its seven minutes of terror landing sequence with clockwork precision, the Curiosity rover landed wheels-down on the surface of Mars and within minutes sent back pictures of rocky Gale Crater.

Mars Curiosity Rover Landing a Success — NASA Jubilant | National Geographic


National Geographic
x

Curiosity Rover Begins Mars Mission

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. hosts a briefing for media following the Curiosity rover's successful landing in Gale Crater on the Red Planet.

Curiosity tweets Mars landing

Watch animation of Curiosity's journey to the surface of Mars, told through tweets the rover sent en route.

For more CNN videos, check out our YouTube channel at

Or visit our site at

NASA Mars Curiosity Rover Report -- June 7, 2013

A NASA Mars Curiosity rover team member gives an update on developments and status of the planetary exploration mission. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft delivered Curiosity to its target area on Mars at 1:31:45 a.m. EDT on Aug. 6, 2012 which includes the 13.8 minutes needed for confirmation of the touchdown to be radioed to Earth at the speed of light. The rover will conduct a nearly two-year prime mission to investigate whether the Gale Crater region of Mars ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life.

Curiosity carries 10 science instruments with a total mass 15 times as large as the science payloads on NASA's Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity. Some of the tools, such as a laser-firing instrument for checking rocks' elemental composition from a distance, are the first of their kind on Mars. Curiosity will use a drill and scoop, which are located at the end of its robotic arm, to gather soil and powdered samples of rock interiors, then sieve and parcel out these samples into the rover's analytical laboratory instruments.

Challenges of Getting to Mars: Curiosity's Seven Minutes of Terror

Team members share the challenges of Curiosity's final minutes to landing on the surface of Mars.

1.8 billion pixels! Amazing new Mars panorama from Curiosity

The highest resolution panorama of Mars to date from the Curiosity rover has been released. -- Curiosity Rover: Facts and Information: (

Panorama in 360 video:

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Menu