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DNA | Mammoths, Neanderthals, and Your Ancestors || Radcliffe Institute

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CARTA: DNA – Neandertal and Denisovan Genomes; Neandertal Genes in Humans; Neandertal Interbreeding

This symposium brings together researchers at the forefront of ancient DNA research and population genetics to discuss current developments and share insights about human migration and adaptation. Recorded on 04/29/2016. [7/2016] [Show ID: 30971]

More from: Ancient DNA and Human Evolution
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Science and technology continue to change our lives. University of California scientists are tackling the important questions like climate change, evolution, oceanography, neuroscience and the potential of stem cells.

UCTV is the broadcast and online media platform of the University of California, featuring programming from its ten campuses, three national labs and affiliated research institutions. UCTV explores a broad spectrum of subjects for a general audience, including science, health and medicine, public affairs, humanities, arts and music, business, education, and agriculture. Launched in January 2000, UCTV embraces the core missions of the University of California -- teaching, research, and public service – by providing quality, in-depth television far beyond the campus borders to inquisitive viewers around the world.
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DNA | Mammoths, Neanderthals, and Your Ancestors || Radcliffe Institute

WELCOME
Lizabeth Cohen, Dean of the Radcliffe Institute and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Department of History, Harvard University

INTRODUCTION
Janet Rich-Edwards (9:17), Codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

MAMMOTHS, NEANDERTHALS, AND YOUR ANCESTORS
Moderator: George Church (24:37), Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School
John Hawks (29:29), Vilas-Borghesi Distinguished Achievement Professor of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Beth Shapiro (54:36), Associate Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz
Spencer Wells (1:20:16), scientist, author, entrepreneur, and former explorer-in-residence and director of the Genographic Project at National Geographic

PANEL DISCUSSION (1:46:05)

AUDIENCE Q&A (1:57:43)
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DNA | The Future Utility of DNA || Radcliffe Institute

THE FUTURE UTILITY OF DNA SCIENCE
Moderator: Christine Seidman (00:44), Thomas W. Smith Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Jacob Corn (2:41), Scientific Director, Innovative Genomics Initiative; Assistant Adjunct Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley
Alison Murdoch (32:54), Professor of Reproductive Medicine and Head of Department, Institute of Genetic Medicine, International Fertility Centre for Life, Newcastle University (United Kingdom)
Floyd Romesberg (59:45), Professor, Department of Chemistry, The Scripps Research Institute

AUDIENCE Q&A (1:27:35)

CLOSING REMARKS
Janet Rich-Edwards (1:38:24), Codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
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What DNA Says About Our Human Family Episode II, Ancient Relatives: Neanderthals and Denisovans

More info and downloads:

In Episode 2, our study of human evolution continues with a look at our ancient ancestors, the hominins. Who were they and what did they look like? We will look at DNA evidence for how modern humans evolved from these ancient ancestors and spread around the globe—and why we are different yet amazingly the same. People have been particularly interested in our relationship to Neandertals, a closely related hominin that went extinct about 35,000 years ago. Continuing our study of mitochondrial DNA, we will use bioinformatics tools to compare our DNA with Neanderthals and an enigmatic hominin group, the Denisovans. We will learn how DNA mutations act as a molecular clock capable of calculating how long it has been since two individuals have shared a common ancestor. With this information, we can make a tree that shows our relationship with Neanderthals and Denisovans and provide DNA evidence for when our ancestors left Africa.


Presenter: Dave Micklos, DNALC Founder and Executive Director
Audience: Grades 9 and above
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DNA | Forensic DNA Investigation || Radcliffe Institute

FORENSIC DNA INVESTIGATION
Greg Hampikian (1:06), Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Joint appointment in Department of Criminal Justice, Director of the Idaho Innocence Project, Boise State University

Introduced by Janet Rich-Edwards, Codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Next in Evolution | Sriram Sankararaman || Radcliffe Institute

ARCHAIC ADMIXTURE IN HUMAN HISTORY (4:54)
Sriram Sankararaman, assistant professor, Department of Computer Science and Department of Human Genetics, UCLA

Welcome and introduction by Immaculata De Vivo, interim faculty codirector of science, Radcliffe Institute; professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; professor of epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

In 2017–2018, the Next in Science series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study focused on innovative research in the study of evolution. The analysis of genetic change examines both historic and current adaptations: how past species evolved over long periods of time and how modern species continue to adjust to present-day conditions.

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

For information about the Radcliffe Institute and its many public programs, visit

DNA | The Ethical Frontier of DNA || Radcliffe Institute

THE ETHICAL FRONTIER OF DNA
Arthur Caplan (2:20), Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor of Bioethics; Director, Division of Medical Ethics, Department of Population Health, NYU Langone Medical Center, NYU School of Medicine

Introduced by Danielle Allen, Director, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, and Professor, Department of Government and Graduate School of Education, Harvard University

Ancient DNA, Neanderthals, and Human Health

Why do genetic disease risks vary across the globe? Did our ancestors mate with Neanderthals? How healthy were ancient humans? The answers to these questions can be found in the genomes of ancient and modern humans. The complex histories of our ancestors are written in DNA and natural selection contributes to differences in disease risks across populations. There is genetic evidence that some of our ancestors mated with Neanderthals, Denisovans, and other unknown “ghost” populations. These ancient couplings are relevant to human health, as having large amounts of Neanderthal DNA increases the likelihood neurological disorders. Intriguingly, genomic medicine approaches can be applied to ancient samples – even when remains are incomplete. On a broad scale, genetic disease risks are similar for ancient and modern humans. However, individuals who lived in the recent past appear to have been healthier than individuals who lived in the deep past. Disease risks are not constant, they continue to evolve. Just as medicine benefits from knowledge of family history, so too can public health genomics benefit from knowledge of our species’ history.

Dr. Joseph Lachance received a B.A. in Biology from University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in Genetics from Stony Brook University. As a postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania, he received an NIH Kirschstein Postdoctoral Fellowship. Dr. Lachance is currently an Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences at Georgia Institute of Technology, where he has been a tenure-track faculty member since January 2015. In 2019 he received the CTL/BP Junior Faculty Teaching Excellence Award, and in 2020 he was named one of Georgia Tech’s Faces of Inclusive Excellence. He is active in multiple scientific societies and has been elected to the executive committee of the American Association of Anthropological Genetics. Dr. Lachance has published over 25 papers, and this work has appeared in Cell, Nature, Cancer Research, and the American Journal of Human Genetics. He studies human population genetics and the genetic causes of health inequities. His research focuses on how hereditary disease risks have evolved over time, and he is building predictive models of health and disease. This research program bridges the gap between evolutionary genomics and genetic epidemiology. Current projects in the his lab include using genetic data to infer human history, studying the evolution of disease risks using ancient DNA, and working with collaboarators in Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, and South Africa to identify genetic variants that increase the risk of prostate cancer in men of African descent. His research is primarily funded by the National Institutes of Health, including a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and a grant from the National Cancer Institute.

Next in Evolution | Discussion and Audience Q&A || Radcliffe Institute

DISCUSSION AND AUDIENCE Q&A

Featuring
Sriram Sankararaman, assistant professor, Department of Computer Science and Department of Human Genetics, UCLA

Alicia R. Martin, research fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital and Broad Institute

Catherine E. Wagner, assistant professor, Department of Botany and Biodiversity Institute, University of Wyoming

James S. Santangelo, graduate student in evolutionary ecology, University of Toronto Mississauga

Moderated by Immaculata De Vivo, interim faculty codirector of science, Radcliffe Institute; professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; professor of epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

In 2017–2018, the Next in Science series at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study focused on innovative research in the study of evolution. The analysis of genetic change examines both historic and current adaptations: how past species evolved over long periods of time and how modern species continue to adjust to present-day conditions.

The Next in Science series provides an opportunity for early-career scientists whose innovative, cross-disciplinary research is thematically linked to introduce their work to one another, to fellow scientists, and to nonspecialists from Harvard and the greater Boston area.

For information about the Radcliffe Institute and its many public programs, visit

Finding our Inner Neanderthal: Evolutionary Geneticist Svante Pääbo's DNA Quest

March 25, 2014 - Part of the Genome: Unlocking Life's Code exhibition events.

Can the DNA of extinct humans provide a clue to our origins? Noted researcher Svante Pääbo discusses a groundbreaking investigation that led to new genetic and geographic connections between Homo sapiens and our ancient ancestors.

More information on the exhibition and events:
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How Neanderthal are you? Tracing our genetic ancestry | Natural History Museum

Scientists examining the evolutionary history recorded within our DNA are uncovering the global human story in greater detail. Watch the film to discover what DNA analyses taught six well-known figures, Maggie Aderin-Pocock, Clive Anderson, Bill Bailey, Kevin Fong, Alice Roberts and Sian Williams about their genetic ancestry.

Find out more in our new Human Evolution gallery:
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The Natural History Museum in London is home to over 80 million specimens, including meteorites, dinosaur bones and a giant squid. Our channel brings the Museum to you - from what goes on behind the scenes to surprising science and stories from our scientists.

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How to Pronounce Ghengis Khan | Ghengis Khan Pronunciation

Learn how to pronounce Ghengis Khan with the American Pronunciation Guide (APG)!

The American Pronunciation Guide is devoted to descriptive linguistics--i.e., the study of the internal phonological, grammatical, and semantic structures of languages without reference to the history of the language or comparison with other languages. We believe that the best way to learn how to say Ghengis Khan (or any other word) is to listen to the pronunciation of our peers. To help foster such descriptive learning, we provide videos combining relevant clips from popular culture. Enjoy!


--SOURCES--

Islamic Civilization in Thirty Lives: Chase Robinson in Conversation with Sarah Chayes, The Graduate Center, CUNY, available at

How Communist China Weaponized the Waters of Asia—Maura Moynihan on the Three Gorges Dam, Flooding, American Thought Leaders - The Epoch Times, available at

DNA | Mammoths, Neanderthals, and Your Ancestors || Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, available at

Things Your History Teacher Never Told You About Julius Caesar, Grunge, available at

Discovery 14: Opening Keynotes - Salim Ismail and Brad Templeton from Singularity University, Ontario Centres of Excellence (OCE), available at

#pronunciation #pronounce #ipronounce

The DNA of Neanderthal people - Part 2

Part 2: Professor Pääbo's lecture in full, including questions and answers at the end.

NUI Galway public lecture by Professor Svante Pääbo, of the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig, on the DNA of Neanderthal people. This event was part of a weekend long international symposium entitled 'From Fossils to the Genome', to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the naming of Neanderthal people by William King, Professor of Geology and Mineralogy at the then Queen's College Galway.

Intersections | 1 of 4 | Keynote || Radcliffe Institute

WELCOME
Lizabeth Cohen, dean of the Radcliffe Institute and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Harvard University

KEYNOTE (9:57)
Angela Flournoy, author of The Turner House; Rona Jaffe Foundation Fellow at the New York Public Library Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers

AUDIENCE Q&A (41:47)

The Undiscovered | 2 of 5 | LIFE || Radcliffe Institute

The 2018 Radcliffe Institute science symposium, “The Undiscovered,” focuses on how scientists explore realities they cannot anticipate. Speakers from across the disciplines of modern science present personal experiences and discuss how to train scientists, educators, and funders to foster the expertise and open-mindedness needed to reveal undiscovered aspects of the world around us.

LIFE
(3:13) Robinson W. Fulweiler, associate professor in the Departments of Earth & Environment and of Biology and director of the Boston University Marine Program, Boston University

(23:14) Joel Dudley, associate professor of genetics and genomic sciences, associate professor of population health science and policy, associate professor of medicine, and director of the Next Generation Healthcare Institute, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai

Discussant: Immaculata De Vivo, interim faculty codirector of the science program, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study; professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School; and professor of epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

PANEL DISCUSSION (43:26)
AUDIENCE Q&A (52:46)

For information about the Radcliffe Institute and its many public programs, visit

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100+ Years at 73 Brattle | John Wang || Radcliffe Institute

A public art installation by John Wang ’16, winner of the biennial Radcliffe Institute Public Art Competition

Located at the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Garden at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

The Radcliffe Institute Public Art Competition is a unique opportunity for Harvard students, who not only receive a $10,000 award and work closely with Radcliffe staff and landscape architects to build their designs, but also have the unique experience of joining theory with practice.

As a senior at Harvard College, Wang was the first undergraduate to win the competition. He is now a first-year student studying architecture in the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Keith Ellenbogen | Ocean Photography || Radcliffe Institute

The acclaimed photographer Keith Ellenbogen showcases his beautiful and compelling ocean-based wildlife images, including his recent exploratory work using high-speed photography and 360-degree immersive camera systems.

Introduction by John Huth, faculty codirector of the science program at the Radcliffe Institute and Donner Professor of Science in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

CARTA: The Genetics of Humanness: The Neanderthal and Denisovan Genomes

UC Santa Cruz’s Ed Green on the science of revealing the history of divergence of the human species from Neanderthal. [12/2011] [Show ID: 20870]

Explore More Science & Technology on UCTV
(
Science and technology continue to change our lives. University of California scientists are tackling the important questions like climate change, evolution, oceanography, neuroscience and the potential of stem cells.

UCTV is the broadcast and online media platform of the University of California, featuring programming from its ten campuses, three national labs and affiliated research institutions. UCTV explores a broad spectrum of subjects for a general audience, including science, health and medicine, public affairs, humanities, arts and music, business, education, and agriculture. Launched in January 2000, UCTV embraces the core missions of the University of California -- teaching, research, and public service – by providing quality, in-depth television far beyond the campus borders to inquisitive viewers around the world.
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Ancient DNA and the new science of the human past

Ancient DNA and the new science of the human past

Air date: Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 3:00:00 PM

Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures

Runtime: 01:05:46

Description: NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture

Beginning in 2010, it became practical to sequence whole genomes from DNA extracted from ancient human boness, and to analyze the data to understand changes in biology over time. Since that timethen, the amount of ancient DNA data has increased at an extraordinary rate, with the number of samples with at least one-fold genome coverage being 5 five in 2013, 18 in 2014, and 116 in 2015. Dr. Reich will begin his lecture by describing how present-day Europeans derive from a fusion highly divergent ancestral populations as different from each other as are Europeans and East Asians. He will then summarize the history of modern humans in Europe over the approximately 45,000 years since they first arrived. He will next describe the spread of farming populations from the Near East over the last twelve thousands12,000 years. He will finally conclude by describing explaining how the analysis of ancient DNA has led to. some of the insights about human biological change over time.

For more information go to

Author: David Reich, D. Phil., Professor of Genetics Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School

Permanent link:

Neanderthal Man with Svante Pääbo - Conversations with History

(Visit: Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Svante Pääbo, Director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, for a discussion of his intellectual journey. Svante Pääbo highlights both the opportunities and obstacles that characterized his 30 year quest to uncover the genome of Neanderthal Man. In the course of his reflections, he elucidates the nature of scientific inquiry and highlights the possible long-term implications of using genetic research to understand the genome of human ancestors and thereby understand the uniqueness of humans. Svante Pääbo was the 2014 Foerster Lecturer at Berkeley.
Recorded on 09/10/2014. Series: Conversations with History [10/2014] [Science] [Show ID: 28721]

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