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DNA | Mammoths, Neanderthals, and Your Ancestors || Radcliffe Institute

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DNA | Mammoths, Neanderthals, and Your Ancestors || Radcliffe Institute

WELCOME
Lizabeth Cohen, Dean of the Radcliffe Institute and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Department of History, Harvard University

INTRODUCTION
Janet Rich-Edwards (9:17), Codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

MAMMOTHS, NEANDERTHALS, AND YOUR ANCESTORS
Moderator: George Church (24:37), Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School
John Hawks (29:29), Vilas-Borghesi Distinguished Achievement Professor of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Beth Shapiro (54:36), Associate Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz
Spencer Wells (1:20:16), scientist, author, entrepreneur, and former explorer-in-residence and director of the Genographic Project at National Geographic

PANEL DISCUSSION (1:46:05)

AUDIENCE Q&A (1:57:43)
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What DNA Says About Our Human Family Episode II, Ancient Relatives: Neanderthals and Denisovans

More info and downloads:

In Episode 2, our study of human evolution continues with a look at our ancient ancestors, the hominins. Who were they and what did they look like? We will look at DNA evidence for how modern humans evolved from these ancient ancestors and spread around the globe—and why we are different yet amazingly the same. People have been particularly interested in our relationship to Neandertals, a closely related hominin that went extinct about 35,000 years ago. Continuing our study of mitochondrial DNA, we will use bioinformatics tools to compare our DNA with Neanderthals and an enigmatic hominin group, the Denisovans. We will learn how DNA mutations act as a molecular clock capable of calculating how long it has been since two individuals have shared a common ancestor. With this information, we can make a tree that shows our relationship with Neanderthals and Denisovans and provide DNA evidence for when our ancestors left Africa.


Presenter: Dave Micklos, DNALC Founder and Executive Director
Audience: Grades 9 and above
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DNA | Forensic DNA Investigation || Radcliffe Institute

FORENSIC DNA INVESTIGATION
Greg Hampikian (1:06), Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Joint appointment in Department of Criminal Justice, Director of the Idaho Innocence Project, Boise State University

Introduced by Janet Rich-Edwards, Codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
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CARTA: DNA–Neandertal and Denisovan Genomes;Neandertal Genes in Humans;Neandertal Interbreeding

(Visit: This symposium brings together researchers at the forefront of ancient DNA research and population genetics to discuss current developments and share insights about human migration and adaptation. Recorded on 04/29/2016. [7/2016] [Show ID: 30971]

Ancient DNA and Human Evolution
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Science and technology continue to change our lives. University of California scientists are tackling the important questions like climate change, evolution, oceanography, neuroscience and the potential of stem cells.

UCTV is the broadcast and online media platform of the University of California, featuring programming from its ten campuses, three national labs and affiliated research institutions. UCTV explores a broad spectrum of subjects for a general audience, including science, health and medicine, public affairs, humanities, arts and music, business, education, and agriculture. Launched in January 2000, UCTV embraces the core missions of the University of California -- teaching, research, and public service – by providing quality, in-depth television far beyond the campus borders to inquisitive viewers around the world.
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Finding our Inner Neanderthal: Evolutionary Geneticist Svante Pääbo's DNA Quest

March 25, 2014 - Part of the Genome: Unlocking Life's Code exhibition events.

Can the DNA of extinct humans provide a clue to our origins? Noted researcher Svante Pääbo discusses a groundbreaking investigation that led to new genetic and geographic connections between Homo sapiens and our ancient ancestors.

More information on the exhibition and events:

The Journey of Man - A Genetic Odyssey

Listen to Spencer Wells updating his findings in this podcast:


You and I, in fact everyone allover the world, we're all literally African under the skin; Brothers and sisters separated by a mere 2.000 generations. Old fashioned concepts of race are not only socially divisive, but scientifically wrong. It's only when we've fully taken this onboard, that we can say with any conviction that the journey our ancestors launched all those years ago, is complete. (Spencer Wells, 2002)

The Journey of Man: A Genetic Odyssey (2002)

There’s No Scientific Basis for Race—It's a Made-Up Label:

Genetics and the Origins of Ancient Indian Civilization

DNA | The Future Utility of DNA || Radcliffe Institute

THE FUTURE UTILITY OF DNA SCIENCE
Moderator: Christine Seidman (00:44), Thomas W. Smith Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Jacob Corn (2:41), Scientific Director, Innovative Genomics Initiative; Assistant Adjunct Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley
Alison Murdoch (32:54), Professor of Reproductive Medicine and Head of Department, Institute of Genetic Medicine, International Fertility Centre for Life, Newcastle University (United Kingdom)
Floyd Romesberg (59:45), Professor, Department of Chemistry, The Scripps Research Institute

AUDIENCE Q&A (1:27:35)

CLOSING REMARKS
Janet Rich-Edwards (1:38:24), Codirector of the Science Program, Radcliffe Institute; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Ghosts and Hybrids: How ancient DNA and new fossils are changing human origins

Dr. John Hawks delivers a lecture on Ancient DNA & Human Origins. at Michigan State University on October 4, 2018.

The rapidly changing field of ancient DNA has settled into a kind of normal science, as several teams of researchers have coalesced around a set of approaches to discover the genetic relationships among ancient peoples.

Hawks is the Vilas-Borghesi Distinguished Achievement Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. He is an anthropologist and studies the bones and genes of ancient humans. He's worked on almost every part of our evolutionary story, from the very origin of our lineage among the apes up to the last 10,000 years of our history.



Are We the Last Neanderthals?

Neanderthals fascinate us: so much like us, yet not quite us. We have long known that they overlapped with modern humans in prehistoric Europe, but recent genetic evidence suggests widespread interbreeding of the two groups. University of Wisconsin biological anthropologist John Hawks is at the forefront of this species-shaking research. He presents the latest findings from the lab and field and discusses what may or may not make us uniquely human.

This program is presented in partnership with the Center for the Humanities and the Institute for Research in the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Video produced by Pentimenti Productions.

This program was recorded on November 2, 2013 as part of the 24th Chicago Humanities Festival, ANIMAL:

The Final Neanderthals by Dr Rachel Wood, at ANU

Dr Rachel Wood, Research School of Earth Sciences, ANU, gives new insights from radiocarbon dating the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in Iberia.

This lecture was part of the Centre for Archaeological Research Lecture Series.
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A Neanderthal Perspective on Human Origins with Svante Pääbo - 2018

(Visit:
0:16 - Introduction
1:45 - Start of Presentation - Svante Pääbo
52:37 - Q & A

Most people are part-Neanderthal, the closest extinct human relative. Svante Pääbo explores human genetic evolution by analyzing preserved genetic material from the remains of ancient organisms, including Neanderthals. What can we learn from the genomes of our closest evolutionary relatives? Pääbo is an evolutionary anthropologist and pioneer of paleogenetics and the director of the Max Plank Institute of Evolutionary Genetics. He was awarded the 2018 Nierenberg Award for Science in the Public Interest. Recorded on 10/03/2018. [12/2018] [Show ID: 34037]

Explore More Humanities on UCTV
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The humanities encourage us to think creatively and explore questions about our world. UCTV explores human culture through literature, history, ethics, philosophy, cinema and religion so we can better understand the human experience.

Explore More Science & Technology on UCTV
(
Science and technology continue to change our lives. University of California scientists are tackling the important questions like climate change, evolution, oceanography, neuroscience and the potential of stem cells.

UCTV is the broadcast and online media platform of the University of California, featuring programming from its ten campuses, three national labs and affiliated research institutions. UCTV explores a broad spectrum of subjects for a general audience, including science, health and medicine, public affairs, humanities, arts and music, business, education, and agriculture. Launched in January 2000, UCTV embraces the core missions of the University of California -- teaching, research, and public service – by providing quality, in-depth television far beyond the campus borders to inquisitive viewers around the world.
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Nova: Neanderthals On Trial (PBS Documentary)

GET ON AMAZON.COM - FREE TRIAL OF AMAZON PRIME nova - neanderthals on trial (documentary). thanks for watching. history life.

NOVA - Neanderthals On Trial 2002 - 2016 Neanderthals ,on Trial The film probes the enigma of our Neanderthal Inside this cave, twenty-eight thousand years .

Nova Neanderthals On Trial Science Documentary.

animal documentaries animal documentaries full episodes animal documentaries discovery channel animal documentaries national geographic animal . Nova .

The DNA of Neanderthal people - Part 2

Part 2: Professor Pääbo's lecture in full, including questions and answers at the end.

NUI Galway public lecture by Professor Svante Pääbo, of the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig, on the DNA of Neanderthal people. This event was part of a weekend long international symposium entitled 'From Fossils to the Genome', to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the naming of Neanderthal people by William King, Professor of Geology and Mineralogy at the then Queen's College Galway.

Sam Harris' Excellent Neanderthal DNA Example

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Sam Harris in his debate/conversation with Ezra Klein
Full debate:
April 9, 2018

DNA | The Ethical Frontier of DNA || Radcliffe Institute

THE ETHICAL FRONTIER OF DNA
Arthur Caplan (2:20), Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor of Bioethics; Director, Division of Medical Ethics, Department of Population Health, NYU Langone Medical Center, NYU School of Medicine

Introduced by Danielle Allen, Director, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, and Professor, Department of Government and Graduate School of Education, Harvard University
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The Human Race | Genetics and DNA | Science Full Documentary

Humans, human race, genetics, DNA, science, science documentary, genetics documentary, DNA documentary, humans documentary, biology

#Biology #Genetics #Science

What is Denisovan DNA?

Scientists have conducted a study that may show many people around the world have the DNA of an ancient human ancestor known as the Denisovans. CBS News science and futurist contributor Michio Kaku joins CBSN to explain.

28:19 Culture Talk: What If My Ancestry Test Shows I Have Neanderthal DNA?

Culture Talk: What If My Ancestry Test Shows I Have Neanderthal DNA?
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WPT University Place: Discovering Homo Naledi

John Hawks, Associate Chair in the Department of Anthropology at UW-Madison, discusses his role in the 2013 Rising Star expedition’s discovery of homo naledi, the newest member of the human family, in South Africa. Hawks explains how the species was identified and shares footage of how the bones were discovered.
Explore the full archive of WPT's University Place lectures online at

Neanderthals and Neurodiversity [Draft 10]

The video (above) is a draft of a 2-hour video presentation that I'm still putting the finishing touches on. Here is the 10-minute overview:

A PDF I compiled to better explain this:
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Autism: The Eusocial Hominid Hypothesis

Abstract:

ASDs (autism spectrum disorders) are hypothesized as one of many adaptive human cognitive variations that have been maintained in modern populations via multiple genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Introgression from archaic hominids (adapted for less demanding social environments) is conjectured as the source of initial intraspecific heterogeneity because strict inclusive fitness does not adequately model the evolution of distinct, copy-number sensitive phenotypes within a freely reproducing population.

Evidence is given of divergent encephalization and brain organization in the Neanderthal (including a ~1520 cc cranial capacity, larger than that of modern humans) to explain the origin of the autism subgroup characterized by abnormal brain growth.

Autism and immune dysfunction are frequently comorbid. This supports an admixture model in light of the recent discovery that MHC alleles (genes linked to immune function, mate selection, neuronal pruning, etc.) found in most modern human populations come from archaic hominids.

Mitochondrial dysfunction, differential fetal androgen exposure, lung abnormalities, and hypomethylation/CNV due to hybridization are also presented as evidence.

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