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Dr. Svante Pääbo — Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes

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Dr. Svante Pääbo — Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes

This lecture was recorded on March 2, 2014 as part of the Distinguished Science Lecture Series hosted by Michael Shermer and presented by The Skeptics Society in California (1992–2015).

Svante Pääbo is the founder of the field of ancient DNA and is the director of the department of genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig. In Neanderthal Man he tells the story of his mission to answer the question of what we can learn from the genes of our closest evolutionary relative, culminating in his sequencing of the Neanderthal genome in 2009. We learn that Neanderthal genes offer a unique window into the lives of our hominin relatives and may hold the key to unlocking the mystery of why humans survived while Neanderthals went extinct. Drawing on genetic and fossil clues, Pääbo explores what is known about the origin of modern humans and their relationship to the Neanderthals and describes the fierce debate surrounding the nature of the two species’ interactions.



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Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes | Svante Paabo | Talks at Google

Neanderthal Man tells the story of geneticist Svante Pääbo's mission to answer this question, and recounts his ultimately successful efforts to genetically define what makes us different from our Neanderthal cousins. Beginning with the study of DNA in Egyptian mummies in the early 1980s and culminating in the sequencing of the Neanderthal genome in 2010, Neanderthal Man describes the events, intrigues, failures, and triumphs of these scientifically rich years through the lens of the pioneer and inventor of the field of ancient DNA.

We learn that Neanderthal genes offer a unique window into the lives of our hominin relatives and may hold the key to unlocking the mystery of why humans survived while Neanderthals went extinct. Drawing on genetic and fossil clues, Pääbo explores what is known about the origin of modern humans and their relationship to the Neanderthals and describes the fierce debate surrounding the nature of the two species' interactions. His findings have not only redrawn our family tree, but recast the fundamentals of human history—the biological beginnings of fully modern Homo sapiens, the direct ancestors of all people alive today.

A riveting story about a visionary researcher and the nature of scientific inquiry, Neanderthal Man offers rich insight into the fundamental question of who we are.

You can find the book on Google Books & Google Play:
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Svante Pääbo - Neanderthal Man In Search of Lost Genomes Audiobook

History Audiobooks Svante Pääbo - Neanderthal Man In Search of Lost Genomes
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Neanderthal Man with Svante Pääbo - Conversations with History

(Visit: Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Svante Pääbo, Director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, for a discussion of his intellectual journey. Svante Pääbo highlights both the opportunities and obstacles that characterized his 30 year quest to uncover the genome of Neanderthal Man. In the course of his reflections, he elucidates the nature of scientific inquiry and highlights the possible long-term implications of using genetic research to understand the genome of human ancestors and thereby understand the uniqueness of humans. Svante Pääbo was the 2014 Foerster Lecturer at Berkeley.
Recorded on 09/10/2014. Series: Conversations with History [10/2014] [Science] [Show ID: 28721]
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2020 Svante Paabo Neanderthals In Us: How Neanderthal Genes Influence Us Today

OIST foundation and Max Plank Institute
effects of Neandertal dna on pain , premature birth ,Covid and other illnesses

Neanderthal Ancestry in Modern-Day Humans with Svante Pääbo

Most people are part-Neanderthal, the closest extinct human relative. Svante Pääbo explores human genetic evolution by analyzing preserved genetic material from the remains of ancient organisms, including Neanderthals. He explores his findings on interbreeding of Neanderthals and modern humans. Watch the Entire Talk Here: [2/2019] [Show ID: 34458]

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The Neanderthals In Us: How Neanderthal Genes Influence Us Today

A presentation by Dr. Svante Pääbo on how genes from Neanderthals still influence us from one of the most outstanding leaders in the field of evolutionary genetics. Dr. Pääbo will discuss how Neanderthal gene variants influence fertility, pain sensitivity and severity of SARS-COV-2 infections in people today.

Svante Pääbo is Director, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology & Adjunct Professor at OIST.

Finding our Inner Neanderthal: Evolutionary Geneticist Svante Pääbo's DNA Quest

March 25, 2014 - Part of the Genome: Unlocking Life's Code exhibition events.

Can the DNA of extinct humans provide a clue to our origins? Noted researcher Svante Pääbo discusses a groundbreaking investigation that led to new genetic and geographic connections between Homo sapiens and our ancient ancestors.

More information on the exhibition and events:

Archaic Genomics - Svante Pääbo

March 27, 2014 - Dr. Svante Pääbo, director of the Department of Genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, has helped us understand human evolution by decoding DNA isolated from the dry bones of our ancestors. Using ancient DNA he demonstrated that Neanderthals interbred with humans when modern humans left Africa 50-80k years ago. In another study, Dr. Pääbo sequenced the DNA from a pinky bone found in a Siberian cave. Comparing this DNA to that of Neanderthal and humans his team determined this bone came from previously unknown species of hominid, now called Denisovans. Dr. Pääbo's lecture covered these stories and other tales written in archaic DNA. View also:

Svante Pääbo: DNA clues to our inner neanderthal

Sharing the results of a massive, worldwide study, geneticist Svante Pääbo shows the DNA proof that early humans mated with Neanderthals after we moved out of Africa. (Yes, many of us have Neanderthal DNA.) He also shows how a tiny bone from a baby finger was enough to identify a whole new humanoid species.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes, Pattie Maes on the Sixth Sense wearable tech, and Lost producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at
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Neanderthal Evolutionary Geneticist Svante Pääbo's DNA Quest - Finding our Inner Neanderthal!

Noted researcher Svante Pääbo discusses a groundbreaking investigation that led to new genetic and geographic connections between Homo sapiens and our ancient ancestors.

Svante Pääbo: The Future of Ancient DNA - Schrödinger at 75: The Future of Biology

Pääbo is a Swedish biologist specialising in evolutionary genetics. Since 1997, he has been director of the Department of Genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. Pääbo is known as one of the founders of paleogenetics, a discipline that uses the methods of genetics to study early humans and other ancient populations. In 1997, Pääbo and colleagues reported their successful sequencing of Neanderthal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), originating from a specimen found in Feldhofer grotto in the Neander valley. In May 2010, Pääbo and his colleagues published a draft sequence of the Neanderthal genome in the journal Science. He and his team also concluded that there was probably interbreeding between Neanderthals and Eurasian (but not Sub-Saharan African) humans. In 2014, he published the book Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes where he, in the mixed form of a memoir and popular science, tells the story of the research effort to map the Neanderthal genome combined with thought on human evolution. In 1992, he received the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, which is the highest honour awarded in German research. Pääbo was elected a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 2000. In October 2009 the Foundation For the Future announced that Pääbo had been awarded the 2009 Kistler Prize for his work isolating and sequencing ancient DNA, beginning in 1984 with a 2,400-year-old mummy. In June 2010 the Federation of European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) awarded him the Theodor Bücher Medal for outstanding achievements in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In 2013, he received Gruber Prize in Genetics for ground breaking research in evolutionary genetics. He was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society in 2016, and in 2017 was awarded the Dan David Prize.

EMBL Keynote Lecture - Of Neanderthals and Denisovans, Svante Pääbo

Presenter: Svante Pääbo, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany

From the EMBO|EMBL Symposium Reconstructing the Human Past - Using Ancient and Modern Genomics
EMBL Advanced Training Centre, Heidelberg, Germany
31 March - 3 April 2019

Our laboratory works on methods to retrieve DNA from ancient bones and other tissue remains as well as sediments found at archaeological excavations. We take a particular interest in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relative of present-day humans. We have generated genomes from a number of Neandertals and retrieved the genome from a small bone found at a site in the Altai Mountains, which turned out to come from a hitherto unknown extinct Asian hominin group related to Neandertals, which we named “Denisovans”. We have shown that gene flow occurred among modern human ancestors and different archaic hominins. Consequently, about 2.0% of the genomes of people living outside Africa come from Neandertals while about 4.0% of the genomes of people living in Oceania come from Denisovans. Some of the genetic variants inherited from Neandertals and Denisovans were advantageous to modern
humans and many are today involved in susceptibility to diseases. I will summarize our current knowledge about the functional consequences of such genetic contributions from archaic
hominins as well as recent work that begin to unravel the population history and interactions among Neandertals, Denisovans, and early modern humans.

10-on-10: The Chronicles of Evolution - Svante Pääbo

Speaker: Svante Pääbo
Professor and Director in Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Department of Evolutionary Genetics

Savante Paabo - Neandertal Genomics

Savante Paabo - Neandertal Genomics

Part of #NEANDERTHAL: The Conference which was organised by the Gibraltar National Museum from 13th to 15th September 2018 at the University of Gibraltar.

Our laboratory works on methods to retrieve DNA from ancient bones and other tissue remains as well as sediments found at archaeological excavations. We take a particular interest in Neandertals, the closest evolutionary relative of present-day humans.

We have generated genomes from a number of Neandertals and shown that gene flow occurred among modern human ancestors and different archaic hominins. Consequently, about 2.0% of the genomes of people living outside Africa come from Neandertals. Some of the genetic variants inherited from Neandertals and Denisovans were advantageous to modern humans and many are involved in susceptibility to diseases today. I will describe recent work that begin to unravel the population history of Neandertals based on Neandertal and early modern human genomes ranging in time between more than 400,000 years ago and about 40,000 years ago. I will also describe direct evidence from ancient genome of interbreeding between Neandertals and other hominins.

© Gibraltar National Museum, 2018
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Pioneer of paleogenetics: Max Planck researcher Svante Pääbo

Svante Pääbo, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, is regarded as the founder of paleogenetics. Together with his team of the Neandertal Genome Project Svante has sequenced the complete genome of a Neandertal for for the first time. It revealed that that Neandertals and modern human had mixed with each other. As a result, Neandertal genes had been passed on to people living outside whose genetic roots are outside Africa.

Svante Pääbo at Nobel Conference 44

Svante Pääbo presenting A Neandertal View of Human Origins at Nobel Conference 44: Who Were the First Humans?

A Neanderthal Perspective on Human Origins by Svante Pääbo

This is the Agnes A. and Constantine E. A. FOERSTER LECTURE on the Immortality of the Soul given at International House, September 10, 2014. Svante Pääbo is a Swedish biologist and evolutionary anthropologist, best known as one of the founders of paleogenetics. His work shows that Neanderthals interbred with Eurasians resulting in traces of Neanderthal DNA in many of us alive today. His book Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes was published earlier this year. For more info see: gradlectures.berkeley.edu.

Diverse Human Origins Svante Pääbo

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Interview - Svante Pääbo

Svante Pääbo is an anthropologist from the Max Planck Institute for. Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig. Svante Pääbo came to the IAST to give a Distinguished Lectures in the Social Sciences on Decoding Neanderthals.

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