This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Earth Science: Crash Course History of Science #20

x

Earth Science: Crash Course History of Science #20

It's Earth Science time!!!! In this field, natural philosophers were asking questions like, what’s up with fossils? Are they the remains of extinct organisms? Or are they so-called “sports of nature”—rocks that just happen to look like living things but don’t /mean/ anything? And most importantly, how old is… everything?


***

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at

Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Mark Brouwer, Erika & Alexa Saur Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters
--

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:
x

The New Chemistry: Crash Course History of Science #18

One of the problems with the whole idea of a single Scientific Revolution is that some disciplines decided not to join any revolution. And others just took a long time to get there.

***

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at

Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Mark Brouwer, Erika & Alexa Saur Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters
--

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:
x

The Industrial Revolution: Crash Course History of Science #21

You probably know some of the signs of industrialization in the nineteenth century: Trains connected cities, symbolizing progress. But they also brought about the destruction of rural lands, divisions between social classes, and rapid urbanization. But there's a whole lot more to talk about in this episode of History of Science!


***

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at

Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Mark Brouwer, Erika & Alexa Saur Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters
--

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:
x

Earth Science: Lecture 1 - Introduction to Earth Science

Additional videos to watch before Lecture 2:
1) Interactive scale of the Universe:
2) Scale of the Universe video:
3) Star sizes video:
4) Asteroid discovery video:
5) The most astounding fact video:
6) Why is the milk gone video:
7) You are here video:

This is the first video I have recorded in quite some time. I apologize for the excess uhm and uhh sounds. Those should be worked out in time!
x

What is Earth Science?

A quick look at the field of Earth Science, including the three main areas of study including astronomy, meteorology, and geology.

Hey there! My name is Mike Sammartano. I'm an educator, instructional designer, and technologist. I spent 15 years teaching astronomy, oceanography, geology, environmental science and meteorology to students in middle and high school. On my channel, you will mostly find videos which explore these topics, along with a handful of instructional technology tutorials. Thanks for watching, and please feel free to connect with me with any suggestions for new videos, comments, or just to say hi!

Subscribe to my channel now to be notified of new videos right when they come out -


Check out additional videos and resources for teaching and learning geology, astronomy, and meteorology - Science.MikeSammartano.com

Follow me on Twitter -

Connect with me on LinkedIn -

Get to know more about me on my website - MikeSammartano.com

Relative Dating of Rock Layers

How to determine to geologic sequence of events that occurred to form a rock formation, all from an exposed rock cross section.

Visit my website at MikeSammartano.com to check out recent blog entries, videos, and more, including worksheets to go along with my science videos.

The Limits of History: Crash Course History of Science #46

It's the final episode of our History of Science series and we thought it would be good to talk a little about some of the people we couldn't get to and some of the reasons we need to talk about diversity in scientists. Thanks for the journey, everyone!

***

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at

Thanks to the following patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Eric Prestemon, Sam Buck, Mark Brouwer, Laura Busby, Zach Van Stanley, Bob Doye, Jennifer Killen, Naman Goel, Nathan Catchings, Brandon Westmoreland, dorsey, Indika Siriwardena, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, SR Foxley, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Malcolm Callis, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Jirat, Ian Dundore
--

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:

Ecology: Crash Course History of Science #38

We’ve explored the origins of modern biology, the earth sciences, and even the sciences of outer space. Now it’s time to put these disciplines together. It's Ecology time!!!

***

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at

Thanks to the following patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Eric Prestemon, Sam Buck, Mark Brouwer, Bob Doye, Jennifer Killen, Naman Goel, Patrick Wiener II, Nathan Catchings, Efrain R. Pedroza, Brandon Westmoreland, dorsey, Indika Siriwardena, James Hughes, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Satya Ridhima Parvathaneni, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Jirat, Ian Dundore
--

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:

Earth Science: Lecture 2 - Atoms and Chemical Bonds

Cathode ray tube video: bit.ly/2fPDqKl

Intro to History of Science: Crash Course History of Science #1

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at

We've been asking big questions for a really long time and we've all wanted to explore how we've sought to answer those questions through the centuries. Questions like, What is stuff? and Where are we? have inspired people all over the world to investigate. So lets dive in and see how we, as a people, have tried to figure this stuff out in this first episode of Crash Course History of Science!

Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Mark Brouwer, Nickie Miskell Jr., Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Steve Marshall
--

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:
x

The Computer and Turing: Crash Course History of Science #36

Computers and computing have changed a lot over the History of Science but ESPECIALLY over the last 100 years. In this episode of Crash Course History of Science, we have a look at that history around World War Two and how that conflict forced changes in computing.


***

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at

Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Eric Prestemon, Sam Buck, Mark Brouwer, Bob Doye, Jennifer Killen, Naman Goel, Patrick Wiener II, Nathan Catchings, Efrain R. Pedroza, Brandon Westmoreland, dorsey, Indika Siriwardena, James Hughes, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Satya Ridhima Parvathaneni, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Jirat, Ian Dundore
--

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:

UPCAT & DOST Examination Reviewer (EARTH SCIENCE)

UPCAT and DOST Examination Reviewer for Earth Science

Both of this examination are time pressured so limited time is provided to answer every question.

Common Questions were gathered with some reference from the K-12 Earth Science Module:



Topics Included:
a. The Universe and the Solar System
b. Earth System
c. Minerals and Rocks
d. Atmosphere
e. Hydrosphere


Transcript:
EARTH SCIENCE QUESTIONS
1. Which is not a characteristic of a mineral?
a. Naturally occurring
b. Organic
c. Definite chemical composition
d. Solid

2. What is the source of igneous rocks?
a. Surface deposits of fine materials
b. Crystallization from molten magma
c. Pressure from the lithosphere
d. Application of both heat and pressure

3. It is the property of some minerals to break along parallel repetitive planes of weakness to form smooth surfaces.
a. Fracture
b. Luster
c. Streak
d. Cleavage

4. What is the most abundant element on the Earth’s crust?
a. Silicon
b. Iron
c. Oxygen
d. Aluminum

5 Which of the following mineral is the hardest?
a. Feldspar
b. Quartz
c. Apatite
d. Flourite

6. This type of rock have layered appearance that is produced by exposure to heat and pressure.
a. Felsic
b. Foliated
c. Mafic
d. Non-foliated

7. It is the layer of the atmosphere that where absorption of dangerous UV radiation takes place.
a. Troposphere
b. Stratosphere
c. Mesosphere
d. Thermosphere

8. It is the layer of the atmosphere that where most meteors burn up.
a. Troposphere
b. Stratosphere
c. Mesosphere
d. Thermosphere

9. A boundary between outer core and inner core.
a. Moho
b. Gutenberg Discontinuity
c. Asthenosphere
d. None of the above

10. What kind of cloud occur in broad layers and often cover the whole sky?
a. Stratus
b. Nimbus
c. Cumulus
d. Cirrus

11. Which of the following describes bathypelagic zone in the ocean?
a. No presence of light
b. Enough sunlight to support photosynthesis
c. Extends as far as 3000 feet below
d. Weak water pressure

12. Which of the following is not true?
a. Earth rotate prograde
b. All planets are located at regular intervals from the Sun
c. Inner terrestrial planets have thin or no atmosphere
d. Jovian planets rotate slower because they are larger in size

13. What explains the accelerating expansion of the universe?
a. Existence of dark energy
b. Existence of dark matter
c. Existence of baryonic matter
d. Existence of anti-particle

14. What would happen if a star with the same size of the Sun dies?
a. It explodes into a black hole
b. It would become a red supergiant
c. It would undergo a planetary nebula phase.
d. All of its density would be concentrated resulting to the creation of neutron star

15. What element is produced when hydrogen atoms are fused through thermonuclear reactions?
a. Lithium
b. Helium
c. Carbon
d. Uranium


Timer video from:


Thanks to Canva for thumbnail:

Earth Science: The Basics - Earth's Geologic History

Evolution: It's a Thing - Crash Course Biology #20

Hank gets real with us in a discussion of evolution - it's a thing, not a debate. Gene distribution changes over time, across successive generations, to give rise to diversity at every level of biological organization.

Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD!

Like CrashCourse on Facebook:
Follow CrashCourse on Twitter:

Table of Contents
1) The Theory of Evolution 1:49
2) Fossils 2:42
3) Homologous Structures 4:36
4) Biogeography 7:02
5) Direct Observation 8:52

References for this episode can be found in the Google document here:

evolution, theory, biology, science, crashcourse, genetics, gene, facts, fossil, fossil record, dinosaur, extinct, extinction, organism, dorudon, rodhocetus, vestigial, structure, similarity, homologous structure, related, relationship, morganucodon, fore limb, hind limb, vertebrate, molecule, DNA, RNA, chimpanzee, fruit fly, biogeography, marsupial, finches, direct observation, drug resistance, resistance, selective pressure, italian wall lizard Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Biology Before Darwin: Crash Course History of Science #19

You’ve probably heard of Charles Darwin, but before we get to him, you really need to understand how different people, throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, tried to answer the same question: “what is life?”


***

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at

Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Mark Brouwer, Erika & Alexa Saur Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters
--

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:
x

Marie Curie and Spooky Rays: Crash Course History of Science #31

It's time to talk about one of the most awesome scientists that has ever been awesome: Marie Curie. She figured out ways to get an amazing education despite the limitations of her homeland, discovered some really important answers to the question what is stuff?, and she helped other people (like her husband) complete their own studies and discoveries.

Did I say she was awesome yet? SHE WAS AWESOME!


***

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at

Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Sam Buck, Mark Brouwer, Jennifer French Lee, Brandon Westmoreland, dorsey, Indika Siriwardena, James Hughes, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Satya Ridhima Parvathaneni, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Ian Dundore
--

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:

Reaching breaking point: Materials, Stresses, and Toughness: Crash Course Engineering #18

Today we’re going to start thinking about materials that are used in engineering. We’ll look at mechanical properties of materials, stress-strain diagrams, elasticity and toughness, and describe other material properties like hardness, creep strength, and fatigue strength.

Crash Course Engineering is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios:


PBSDS wants to hear from you! Take the PBS Digital Studios Survey today:

***

RESOURCES:













***

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at

Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Mark Brouwer, Trevin Beattie, Satya Ridhima Parvathaneni, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Eric Kitchen, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters
--

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:

Introduction to Earth Science

This HD dramatic video choreographed to powerful music introduces the viewer/student to the wonder of Earth Science. It is designed as a motivational trailer to be shown in classrooms by Earth Science and Physical Science teachers in middle, high school and college as a visual Introduction to the beauty and complexity of the planet Earth.

Music is Imperatrix Mundi by Jo Blankenburg

Please rate this video and feel free to comment. If you like it, please help me spread the word by posting links on your media websites. The more students who can enjoy these dramatic videos, the better!

To view all of my videos in Biology, Earth Science, Astronomy, Chemistry and Physics, subscribe to my channel at: I will be releasing new videos periodically.

I wish to thank all the quality video and music producers whose postings enabled me to assemble this video for educational use. To best enjoy this video, turn up your speakers. The music is very powerful and dramatic!

I can customize this video to add your name or school name at the end credits, for a very modest fee. If interested, email me at fsgregs@comcast.net

Until recently, you were able to download my videos for free from my other video storage site (vimeo.com). Recently, however, they began charging a significant membership fee to enable that feature, so I regret that downloading from there is no longer available. However, you can search for and obtain free download addons for your browser that will allow you to download my videos from either YouTube or Vimeo.

Asteroids: Crash Course Astronomy #20

Now that we’ve finished our tour of the planets, we’re headed back to the asteroid belt. Asteroids are chunks of rock, metal, or both that were once part of smallish planets but were destroyed after collisions. Most orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, but some get near the Earth. The biggest, Ceres is far smaller than the Moon but still big enough to be round and have undergone differentiation.

CORRECTION: In the episode we say that 2010 TK7 is 800 km away. However, 2010 TK7 stays on average 150 million kilometers from Earth, but that can vary wildly.
Sorry about that!

--
Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at
--
Table of Contents
Asteroids Are Chunks of Rock, Metal, or Both 1:45
Most Orbit the Sun Between Mars and Jupiter 7:16
Ceres is Far Smaller Than the Moon, But Large Enough to be Round 3:43

--

PBS Digital Studios:

Follow Phil on Twitter:

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

--

PHOTOS/VIDEOS
Timelapse of Asteroid 2004 FH's flyby [credit: NASA/JPL Public Domain]
Asteroid Discovery Video [credit: Scott Manley - scottmanley1972@gmail.com]
Inner Solar System [credit: Wikimedia Commons]
Kirkwood gaps [credit: Wikimedia Commons]
Ceres, Earth & Moon size comparison [credit: NASA]
Dawn Glimpses Ceres’ North Pole [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA]
Ceres cutaway [credit: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)]
Bright Spot on Ceres Has Dimmer Companion [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA]
Vesta [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCAL/MPS/DLR/IDA]
Lutetia [credit: ESA]
Gaspra [credit: NASA]
Steins [credit: ESA/Osiris]
Mathilde [credit: NEAR Spacecraft Team, JHUAPL, NASA]
Ida [credit: NASA/JPL]
Kleopatra [credit: Stephen Ostro et al. (JPL), Arecibo Radio Telescope, NSF, NASA]
An artist's conception of two Pluto-sized dwarf planets in a collision around Vega. [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle (SSC)]
Itokawa [credit: ISAS, JAXA]
An artist's illustration showing two asteroid belts and a planet orbiting Epsilon Eridani [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech]
Near-Earth Asteroids [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech]
Lagrange Points Diagram [credit: Wikimedia Commons]
TK7 [credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA]
165347 Philplait [credit: Larry Denneau/Pan-STARRS via Amy Mainzer]

What Are the Main Branches of Earth Science

There are so many things we can learn about the world around us. Let’s take a closer look at the main branches of Earth science.

Learn more by reading the full article:

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu