This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Erik Satie ~ Once Upon A Time In Paris

x

Erik Satie ~ Once Upon A Time In Paris (Artwork by Edouard Leon Cortes)

Songs ~ Gymnopedies #1 ~ Gnossiennes #1,3,4,5 ~
Album ~ Satie: Works For Piano Solo And Piano Duet ~
Artist ~ Pianist: Anne Queffelec ~
with artwork by Edouard Leon Cortes
Tracks: 0:00 Gymnopedies #1
3:32 Gnossiennes #1
6:52 Gnossiennes #3
9:33 Gnossiennes #4
11:52 Gnossiennes #5
x

3 Hours of Once Upon a Time in Paris - Erik Satie [HD]

Trois heures de cette unique pièce d'art.

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No.1

Les Gymnopédies, publiés à Paris à partir de 1888, sont trois compositions pour piano écrites par le compositeur et pianiste français Erik Satie.

Les peintures d'Édouard Cortès.
x

Erik Satie - Once Upon A Time in Paris

ℰ Erik Satie Gymnopedies and Gnossiennes.
Did you ever watch Woody Allen's movie Midnight in Paris?

● Pictures: Eduard Cortes
These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3/4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure.
*************************************************

●Lent et douloureux (D major / D minor)
●Lent et triste (C major)
●Lent et grave (A minor)
*************************************************
By the end of 1896, Satie's popularity and financial situation were ebbing. Claude Debussy, whose popularity was rising at the time, helped draw public attention to the work of his friend. Debussy expressed his belief that the second Gymnopédie did not lend itself to orchestration. (Orchestrations of this Gymnopédie were only realised many decades later, by other composers, and not frequently performed.) Thus, in February 1897, Debussy orchestrated the third and first only, reversing the numbering: Satie's first became Debussy's third, and vice versa. The score was then published in 1898.
x

3 Hours- Erik Satie Gymnopédies and Gnossiennes- Once Upon a Time in Paris- Study and Relaxing Music

Erik Satie
Éric Alfred Leslie Satie (UK: /ˈsæti, ˈsɑːti/, US: /sæˈtiː, sɑːˈtiː/, French: [eʁik sati]; 17 May 1866 – 1 July 1925), who signed his name Erik Satie after 1884, was a French composer and pianist. Satie was an influential artist in the late 19th- and early 20th-century Parisian avant-garde. His work was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music, and the Theatre of the Absurd.

Gymnopédies
The Gymnopédies (French pronunciation: ​[ʒim.nɔ.pe.di]), or Trois Gymnopédies, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist Erik Satie. The first and third were published in 1888 and the second in 1895.

Gnossiennes
The Gnossiennes (French pronunciation: ​[ɡnosjεn]) are several piano compositions written by the French composer Erik Satie in the late 19th century. The works are for the most part in free time (lacking time signatures or bar divisions) and highly experimental with form, rhythm and chordal structure. The form as well as the term was invented by Satie.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
x

Erik Satie Once Upon A Time In Paris

0:00 gymnopedie # 1
3:32 Gnossienne No. 1
6:52 Gnossienne No. 3
9:33 Gnossienne No. 4
11:52 Gnossienne No. 5

Khatia Buniatishvili - Erik Satie: Gymnopédie No.1

Khatia Buniatishvili’s new music video for “Gymnopédie No.1” by Erik Satie from her new album “Labyrinth.”

Listen & order the album here:

“Labyrinth” explores the unfathomable quest that is human life. It plots a filmic course through hesitance, wistfulness, sensuality, pleasure and pain – all seen through the eyes of a woman enlightened by self-reflection and wisdom. Recorded at La Grande Salle Pierre Boulez at the Philharmonie de Paris, the album occupies its own half-real domain, drawing on the evocative language of composers from Scarlatti to Morricone and from Bach to Glass.

The labyrinth, says the French-Georgian pianist, is “our fate and creation; our impasse and deliverance; the polyphony of life, senses, reawakened dreams and the neglected present; unexpected and expected turnings of the said or unsaid ... The labyrinth of our mind.”

International release date: October 9, 2020

CONNECT WITH KHATIA BUNIATISHVILI:
► Website & Tour Dates:
► Facebook:
► Instagram:
► Twitter:

CONNECT WITH SONY CLASSICAL:
► Website:
► Facebook:
► Instagram:
► Twitter:
► Youtube:

© 2020 Sony Classical, a division of Sony Music Entertainment.

#KhatiaBuniatishvili #Labyrinth #Gymnopédie #ErikSatie

Erik SATIE - Gymnopedies 1, 2, 3 (60 min)

The Gymnopédies, published in Paris starting in 1888, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist Erik Satie.


Soundtrack :

-- At First Sight
-- Corrina, Corrina (1994, Jessie Nelson)
-- My Dinner With André (1981, Louis Malle)
-- The Royal Tenenbaums
-- Valentine's Day
-- What Lies Beneath
-- Mr Nobody (2009, Jaco Van Dormael)
-- An Other Woman (1988, Woody Allen)

The three Gymnopédies are part of the soundtrack for the anime feature film The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya.

An interpolation of Gymnopédie No. 1 is looped throughout the chorus of Janet Jackson's song Someone to Call My Lover.

Gymnopédie No. 1 is played near the end of the 2015 film Love by Gaspar Noe.

A remixed version of Gymnopédie No. 1 composed by Masafumi Takada is part of the soundtrack for the Grasshopper Manufacture 2001 video game Flower, Sun, and Rain.

An adaptation of Gymnopédie No. 1 to the Game Boy Advance's hardware by Shogo Sakai is used as background music in the 2006 Japanese video game Mother 3 under the title Leder's Gymnopédie.

A version of Gymnopédie No. 1 plays in the JRPG Persona 2, when the player visits the 'Velvet Room' and stays there until after the Velvet Room's main theme finishes.

Gymnopédie No. 1 is played by Gerry (Ben Mendelsohn) in the 2015 film, Mississippi Grind.


Gymnopedies 1, 2, 3 Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Satie - Gymnopédie No. 1

Satie - Gymnopédie No. 1
Click the ????bell to always be notified on new uploads!
♫ Listen on Spotify:
♫ MIDI:
♫ Facebook:
♫ Instagram:
♫ Twitter:
♫ Buy me a coffee:

Hope you enjoy my performance of Satie's First Gymnopédie.

Sheet music & MIDI:

Outro: Debussy - Arabesque No. 1

Hello, I'm Rousseau, I make piano covers of classical and pop songs with a reactive visualizer. New videos every Monday!
#Rousseau #Piano #PianoCover

1 Hour of Once Upon a Time in Paris - Erik Satie [HD]

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No.1

Alfred Eric Leslie Satie (Honfleur, 17 May 1866 -- Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a gymnopedist in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a phonometrograph or phonometrician (meaning someone who measures (and writes down) sounds) preferring this designation to that of musician, after having been called a clumsy but subtle technician in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. He was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music and the Theatre of the Absurd.
The Gymnopédies, published in Paris starting in 1888, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist, Erik Satie.

These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3/4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure. Collectively, the Gymnopedies are regarded as the precursors to modern ambient music[citation needed] - gentle yet somewhat eccentric pieces which, when composed, defied the classical tradition. For instance, the first few bars feature a disjunct chordal theme in the bass - first, a G-major 7th in the bass, and then a B-minor chord, also in the lower register. Then comes the one-note theme in D major. Although the collection of chords at first seems too complex to be harmonious, the melody soon imbues the work with a soothing atmospheric quality.

Satie himself used the term furniture music to refer to some of his pieces, implying they could be used as mood-setting background music. However, Satie used this term to refer to only some of his later, 20th century compositions, without specific reference to the Gymnopédies as background music. From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie's body of furniture music, perhaps due to John Cage's interpretation of them.
[from Wikipedia]


Artwork: Leonora Carrington The Temptation of St.Anthony
Played by: Daniel Varsano, Philippe Entremont
x

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No. 1 - Piano Tutorial Easy - How To Play (Synthesia)

➜ SHEET MUSIC:
➜ Learn Piano Easy:

More Piano Tutorials:
Original productions of myself:
Facebook PianoTutorialEasy:
TWITTER PianoTutorialEasy:

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No. 1- piano tutorial easy - learn how to play Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No. 1 in an easy beginner piano lesson with synthesia.

This easy piano arrangement was created by Michael Carstensen.

➜ Get the newest sheets:

➜ Subscribe:


➜ NEW Pop Music - Piano Tutorial EASY:

➜ OLD Pop Music - Piano Tutorial EASY:

➜ NEW Pop Music - Piano Tutorial ADVANCED:

➜ OLD Pop Music - Piano Tutorial ADVANCED:

➜ Movie/TV-Series - Piano Tutorial EASY:

➜ Movie/TV-Series - Piano Tutorial ADVANCED:

➜ Classical Music - Piano Tutorial EASY:

➜ Classical Music - Piano Tutorial ADVANCED:

➜ NEW Original Piano Pieces - EASY:

➜ NEW Original Piano Pieces - ADVANCED:

➜ Games Music - Piano Tutorial:

➜ Traditional Music - Piano Tutorial:

DISCLAIMER: This video and description contain affiliate links, which means that I receive a small commission when you click on one of the product links. This help supports the channel and allows me to continue making such videos. Thanks for your support!

#PianoTutorial #PianoEasy #PianoTutorialEasy

Gymnopédie No. 1 ~ Erik Satie ~ 10 HOUR LOOP Classical Piano Music for Relaxation, Study and Sleep

Please enjoy this classic song, I hope this video will be great for studying, sleeping, and relaxing :-)

Please subscribe if you enjoy!

About Erik Satie's Gymnopédies (from wikipedia):

The Gymnopédies are the first compositions with which Erik Satie tried to cut himself loose from the conventional 19th century salon music environment of his father and stepmother. In September 1887 Satie composed three sarabands (Trois Sarabandes), taking a quote from Contamine's La Perdition by way of introduction. By this time, Satie knew Contamine personally.

Satie apparently used the word gymnopédiste (gymnopaedist), before having written a note of his later famous gymnopédies.

The anecdote of Satie introducing himself as a gymnopaedist in December 1887 runs as follows: the first time Satie visited the Chat Noir cabaret, he was introduced to its director, Rodolphe Salis, famous for serving sharp comments. Being coerced to mention his profession, Satie, lacking any recognisable professional occupation, presented himself as a gymnopaedist, supposedly in an attempt to outwit the director.

The composition of the three Gymnopédies started only two months later, and was completed in April 1888.

In August 1888, the First Gymnopédie was published, accompanied by the verse of Contamine quoted above. However, it remains uncertain whether the poem was composed before the music, or whether Contamine intended the verse as a tribute to his friend, who had now completed both a set of sarabands and gymnopédies.

Later the same year the Third Gymnopédie was published. There was, however, no publication of the Second Gymnopédie until 7 years later, with several announcements of an impending publication of this gymnopédie being made in the Chat Noir and Auberge du Clou periodicals.




Erik Satie: Gymnopedie No 1 (by Kevin MacLeod) Attribution License (incompetech.com)

Erik Satie 'Gymnopedie No.1' on Modular Synthesizer : Once upon a time in Paris





#sleepmusic, #satie, #modularsynth

#hermod, #squarp, #mutable, #rings

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No.1, No.2 and No.3 Sheet Music

These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3
4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure. Collectively, the Gymnopédies are regarded as an important precursor to modern ambient music[1] The first few bars of Gymnopédie No. 1 consist of an alternating progression of two major seventh chords, the first on the subdominant, G, and the second on the tonic, D.

The melodies of the pieces use deliberate, but mild, dissonances against the harmony, producing a piquant, melancholy effect that matches the performance instructions, which are to play each piece painfully (douloureux), sadly (triste), or gravely (grave).

From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie's body of furniture music, perhaps because of John Cage's interpretation of them.

Gymnopédie No. 1 - Erik Satie [Piano Tutorial] (Synthesia)

♫ Sheet Music:
► Learn the piano step by step: *
► Learn piano songs quick and easy: *
► iTunes:
► Spotify:
► Sheet Music:
► Classical Sheet Music:
► Support me on Patreon:
► Facebook:
► Twitter:
* Affiliate Link

Enjoy this well known piano piece composed by Erik Satie!

The MIDI was made by Bernd Krueger at the website:

♫ Promote Your Music ♫

To submit your music on my channel:

➝ Write me a PM on Facebook:
➝ Always send a link or music file of your work.
➝ If I'm interested, I will message you back.

Composer(s): Erik Satie

Original Music © Erik Satie (1888)
x

Erik Satie - Gymnopédies No. 1 and 3 | Symfonieorkest Vlaanderen

Symfonieorkest Vlaanderen / Flanders Symphony Orchestra
Jan Latham-Koenig, conductor
Nathalie Gaudefroy, solist

Erik Satie - Gymnopédies No. 1 and 3

Recorded 18.05.2014 at deSingel Antwerpen

Follow us:
website |
Facebook | @symfonieorkest
Instagram | @symfonieorkestvlaanderen

Erik Satie Once Upon A Time In Paris

♬ Erik Satie ♯ 'Once upon a time in Paris' - GYMNOPÉDIES ( I, II, III) ♯

JOIN US here ► and ENJOY hours of BEST CLASSICAL MUSIC here►
ERIK SATIE (17 May 1866 – 1 July 1925) FRANCE, MODERNISM (SATIE PAGE►
These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3/4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure. Collectively, the Gymnopédies are regarded as an important precursor to modern ambient music—‌gentle yet somewhat eccentric pieces which, when composed, defied the classical tradition.[citation needed] For instance, the first few bars of Gymnopédie No. 1 consist of an alternating progression of two major seventh chords, the first on the subdominant, G, and the second on the tonic, D.

The melodies of the pieces use deliberate, but mild, dissonances against the harmony, producing a piquant, melancholy effect that matches the performance instructions, which are to play each piece painfully, sadly or gravely.

From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie's body of furniture music, perhaps because of John Cage's interpretation of them.
The work was possibly based upon the poetry of J. P. Contamine de Latour (1867–1926), who wrote Les Antiques (The Ancients), a poem containing these lines:
Slanting and shadow-cutting a bursting stream
Trickled in gusts of gold on the shiny flagstone
Where the amber atoms in the fire gleaming
Mingled their sarabande with the gymnopaedia

Source:



SEE ALSO:

♬ The BEST Of SATIE Playlist ►

♬ ROMANTIC MUSIC Playlist ►

♬ RELAXING MUSIC Playlist ►

♬ CLASSICAL FOR KIDS Playlist ►

♬ CHRISTMAS & NEW YEAR'S EVE Playlist ►

♬ FAMOUS (OPERA) ARIAS Playlist ►

FOLLOW MELODY CLASSICAL on:

TWITTER ►
FACEBOOK ►
GOOGLE+ ►

♬ Erik Satie ♯ 'Once upon a time in Paris' - GYMNOPÉDIE No.1 ♯

JOIN US here ► and ENJOY hours of BEST CLASSICAL MUSIC here►
ERIK SATIE (17 May 1866 – 1 July 1925) FRANCE, MODERNISM (SATIE PAGE►
These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3/4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure. Collectively, the Gymnopédies are regarded as an important precursor to modern ambient music—‌gentle yet somewhat eccentric pieces which, when composed, defied the classical tradition.[citation needed] For instance, the first few bars of Gymnopédie No. 1 consist of an alternating progression of two major seventh chords, the first on the subdominant, G, and the second on the tonic, D.

The melodies of the pieces use deliberate, but mild, dissonances against the harmony, producing a piquant, melancholy effect that matches the performance instructions, which are to play each piece painfully, sadly or gravely.

From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie's body of furniture music, perhaps because of John Cage's interpretation of them.
The work was possibly based upon the poetry of J. P. Contamine de Latour (1867–1926), who wrote Les Antiques (The Ancients), a poem containing these lines:
Slanting and shadow-cutting a bursting stream
Trickled in gusts of gold on the shiny flagstone
Where the amber atoms in the fire gleaming
Mingled their sarabande with the gymnopaedia

Source:



SEE ALSO:

♬ The BEST Of SATIE Playlist ►

♬ ROMANTIC MUSIC Playlist ►

♬ RELAXING MUSIC Playlist ►

♬ CLASSICAL FOR KIDS Playlist ►

♬ CHRISTMAS & NEW YEAR'S EVE Playlist ►

♬ FAMOUS (OPERA) ARIAS Playlist ►

FOLLOW MELODY CLASSICAL on:

TWITTER ►
FACEBOOK ►
GOOGLE+ ►

♬ Erik Satie ♯ 'Once upon a time in Paris' - GYMNOPÉDIE No.3 ♯

JOIN US here ► and ENJOY hours of BEST CLASSICAL MUSIC here►
ERIK SATIE (17 May 1866 – 1 July 1925) FRANCE, MODERNISM (SATIE PAGE►
These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3/4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure. Collectively, the Gymnopédies are regarded as an important precursor to modern ambient music—‌gentle yet somewhat eccentric pieces which, when composed, defied the classical tradition.[citation needed] For instance, the first few bars of Gymnopédie No. 1 consist of an alternating progression of two major seventh chords, the first on the subdominant, G, and the second on the tonic, D.

The melodies of the pieces use deliberate, but mild, dissonances against the harmony, producing a piquant, melancholy effect that matches the performance instructions, which are to play each piece painfully, sadly or gravely.

From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie's body of furniture music, perhaps because of John Cage's interpretation of them.
The work was possibly based upon the poetry of J. P. Contamine de Latour (1867–1926), who wrote Les Antiques (The Ancients), a poem containing these lines:
Slanting and shadow-cutting a bursting stream
Trickled in gusts of gold on the shiny flagstone
Where the amber atoms in the fire gleaming
Mingled their sarabande with the gymnopaedia

Source:



SEE ALSO:

♬ The BEST Of SATIE Playlist ►

♬ ROMANTIC MUSIC Playlist ►

♬ RELAXING MUSIC Playlist ►

♬ CLASSICAL FOR KIDS Playlist ►

♬ CHRISTMAS & NEW YEAR'S EVE Playlist ►

♬ FAMOUS (OPERA) ARIAS Playlist ►

FOLLOW MELODY CLASSICAL on:

TWITTER ►
FACEBOOK ►
GOOGLE+ ►

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu