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Fisheries Economics & Policy: Individual and Transferable Quotas

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Fisheries Economics & Policy: Individual and Transferable Quotas

This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. This video looks at individual and transferable quotas within the fishing industry. The Fisheries Economics & Policy series will cover management strategies to preserve fishing in the long term and will include concepts such as open access, common pool resources, tragedy of the commons, maximum economic yield, taxes and subsidies, reducing effort, territorial use rights, transferable quotas and externalities.

To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out:
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Fisheries Economics & Policy: Intro to Fisheries Management

This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. The first of our Fisheries Economics & Policy series, this video introduces the concept of how a population of fish can be managed sustainably. The series will cover management strategies to preserve fishing in the long term and will include concepts such as open access, common pool resources, tragedy of the commons, maximum economic yield, taxes and subsidies, reducing effort, territorial use rights, transferable quotas and externalities.

To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out:

Fishing video footage courtesy of Atlantic Group Norway:
Original video can be found here:

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Fisheries Economics & Policy: Subsidies and Taxes

This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. This video looks at subsidies and taxes in the fishery industry and how it effects the fisherman's incentives. The Fisheries Economics & Policy series will cover management strategies to preserve fishing in the long term and will include concepts such as open access, common pool resources, tragedy of the commons, maximum economic yield, taxes and subsidies, reducing effort, territorial use rights, transferable quotas and externalities.

To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out:

For copyright information on all sound effects, see
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Fisheries Economics & Policy: Marine Protected Areas

This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. This video looks at marine protected areas within the fishing industry and the costs and benefits involved in establishing these areas. The Fisheries Economics & Policy series will cover management strategies to preserve fishing in the long term and will include concepts such as open access, common pool resources, tragedy of the commons, maximum economic yield, taxes and subsidies, reducing effort, territorial use rights, transferable quotas and externalities.

To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out:

For copyright information on all sound effects, see
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Fisheries Economics & Policy: A Closer Look at Fisheries

This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. This video looks closer at fisheries today and the problems they face. The Fisheries Economics & Policy series will cover management strategies to preserve fishing in the long term and will include concepts such as open access, common pool resources, tragedy of the commons, maximum economic yield, taxes and subsidies, reducing effort, territorial use rights, transferable quotas and externalities.

To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out:

For copyright information on all sound effects, see

Fisheries Economics & Policy: Maximum Economic Yield

This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. This video covers maximum economic yield in fishing and fishing quotas. We'll compare growth rates and fish populations and look at where on the growth curve the population reaches sustainability. We'll also introduce the concepts of fishing effort, economic rent and maximum sustainable yields.

To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out:

For copyright information on all sound effects, see

Fisheries Economics & Policy: Territorial Use Rights Fisheries

This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. This video looks at territorial use rights fisheries and the costs and benefits involved for both the fishermen and the environment. The Fisheries Economics & Policy series will cover management strategies to preserve fishing in the long term and will include concepts such as open access, common pool resources, tragedy of the commons, maximum economic yield, taxes and subsidies, reducing effort, territorial use rights, transferable quotas and externalities.

To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out:

For copyright information on all sound effects, see

Individual Transfer Quotas (ITQs)

This video discusses Individual Transfer Quotas (ITQs). ITQs are quotas that limit the number of fish a fisherman can catch and are intended to prevent overfishing. Absent regulation, each fisherman has an incentive to continue catching fish beyond the quantity which is socially efficient (each fisherman who adds an additional boat creates a negative externality, because his or her new boat with catch some fish that would have been caught by other people's boats anyway). To prevent depleted fish stocks ITQs limit the quantity of fish caught to the socially efficient level. ITQs can be bought and sold on markets and are initially given out by auction or based on historical catch. ITQs can create issues when they incentivize fishermen to throw back fish caught accidentally (bycatch and high-grading). These issues can be addressed by allowing fishermen to purchase temporary overages when they return with their catch.

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AGEC 350 - Fisheries

The simple economics of an open-access fishery.

SDG 14 - Indicators of fish stocks, sustainability of fisheries, and illegal fishing



SDG 14 - Indicators of fish stocks, sustainability of fisheries, illegal fishing and access rights for small-scale fishers

An overview of SDG indicators 14.4.1, 14.6.1, 14.7.1, 14.b.1, measuring fish stocks, sustainability of fisheries, illegal fishing and access rights for small-scale fishers.

Related videos with more information on SDG indicators under FAO custodianship:
• Monitoring the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: the role of FAO
• SDG 2 – Indicators of hunger and severity of food insecurity
• SDG 2 – Indicators of productivity and income of small-scale food producers
• SDG 2 – Indicator of agricultural sustainability
• SDG 2 – Indicators of conservation of genetic resources for food and agriculture and risk status of livestock breeds
• SDG 2 – Indicator of public investment in agriculture
• SDG 2 – Indicator of price volatility
• SDG 5 – Indicators of women’s ownership of agricultural land and equal rights to land ownership
• SDG 6 – Indicators of water use efficiency and water stress
• SDG 12 – Indicator of global food losses
• SDG 15 - Indicators of sustainable forests and mountains

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Fishing Quota Film

Hugo Salgado: Individual Transferable Quotas in Chilean Fisheries

A Community Colloquium presents Hugo Salgado, Professor of Universidad be Concepcion, Chile: Individual Transferable Quotas (ITQ) in Chilean Fisheries: A tale of economic success and social disconformity. ITQs in Chile have led to economic success by creating more secure jobs, products of higher value, and more exports with reduced catches. Nevertheless, this has generated industry concentration, unemployment, entry of new fishermen into the artisanal sector, and entry barriers in the processing industry. Wages in the harvesting and processing industry have decreased. The highly concentrated industry now has more political power to influence regulators and the quota-setting process. As this process is now controlled by the industry, quotas have been set much higher than biological recommendations, and harvests have been lower than the quotas set during the past few years. Fish stocks do not seem to recover, indicating overexploitation. All of this has generated intense debate between those who are benefitting and those who are being negatively affected by the ITQ system. Understanding this process is crucial to designing ITQ systems that could contribute to more sustainable fisheries in developing countries, not only from an economic perspective, but also from a biological and social perspective, too.

Fishing Quotas and Regulations

Ted Talk (fishing quotas, and fisheries)

Economics of fisheries lecture

Lecture covers biological relationship between fish population and growth rate, economically efficient level of harvesting, and an overview of policies to manage fisheries.
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NZ's Fishing Quota Management System

What is a fishing Quota Management System? It’s a way of ensuring the sustainability of fish stocks, a healthy environment, and providing for consumer demand for fish.

Subject Areas:
■ Science & Technology
■ World History / Geography

Topics:
■ Entrepreneurship
■ Environment
■ Government
■ Property Rights
■ Regulations
■ New Zealand

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A Fisherman's Perspective of the Individual Fishing Quota System in Alaska 10/12/12

Author Dean Adams presented A Fisherman's Perspective of the Individual Fishing Quota System in Alaska - Before, During, and After Implementation as part of Western Washington University's Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series at 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12, 2012 in Communications Facility Room 125 on the Western campus.

The initiation of the Individual Fishing Quota system in 1995 marked the end of the derby fisheries for the halibut and sablefish longline fisheries in Alaska. Adams' career in commercial longline fishing spanned the derby years and extended into the IFQ fishery. The IFQ system, a radical departure from traditional fishery management, has resulted in extended fishing seasons, minimized waste and bycatch of target and nontarget species, improved safety for the fishing industry, and improved food quality.

As a consequence, the economic value of the resource has increase substantially.
Adams participated in the federal fisheries management process leading up to the implementation of the IFQ system both individually and as a representative for the Fishing Vessel Owners Association, a Seattle-based group of owner/operators in the Alaska longline fishery. He will tell the story from his perspective, which will include discussion of problems associated with the IFQ system -- some anticipated, and some, not.

The speaker series is held by Western's Huxley College of the Environment to bring together the environmentally minded community and other interested members of the WWU and Bellingham communities. Speakers address topics of contemporary environmental concern in the region and the world.

For more information, please contact the main office of Huxley College of the Environment, at (360) 650-3520.

Western's Huxley College of the Environment is one of the oldest environmental colleges in the nation and a recognized national leader in producing the next generation of environmental stewards. The College's academic programs reflect a broad view of the physical, biological, social and cultural world. This innovative and interdisciplinary approach makes Huxley unique. The College has earned international recognition for the quality of its programs.

Management Options.mpg

The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council strives to manage our fisheries to achieve the greatest overall benefit to the nation.

To do so the Council must make some tough decisions regarding the allocation of fish between sectors. For each federally managed species the Council uses historical catch records, along with social and economic data, to determine the percentage of the total allowable catch that can be harvested by each sector. That percentage is the annual quota that lets the commercial and recreational sectors know how much fish they can catch each year.

Common Fisheries Policy and prevention of discards

A worldwide problem in fisheries is the fact that unwanted bycatch is returned to in the form of discards. Fish or other marine organisms that are thrown back into the sea after the target fish have been selected out almost never survive. The new European Common Fisheries Policy dictates that bycatch needs to be landed in the future, in order to stimulate research and developments in gear selectivity. The use of remote electronic monitoring during fishing operations it is expected that both monitoring will be facilitated and new inventions will lead to widespread use of smart gear and netting and in changes in the behaviour of fishermen to fight wasteful fishing practices. This video was produced by the ComFish project and is one of its deliverables. - See more at:

Fishery Conservation: Privatize the Oceans?

By explaining regulation in depth, this video attempts to educate people about the possibility that governmental regulation MAY not be effective for all fish species. It also presents a possible alternate solution to regulation to ensuring the future health of the United States fisheries.

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