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Fisheries Economics & Policy: Maximum Economic Yield

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maximum sustainable yield

Economics of fisheries lecture

Lecture covers biological relationship between fish population and growth rate, economically efficient level of harvesting, and an overview of policies to manage fisheries.
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AGEC 350 - Fisheries

The simple economics of an open-access fishery.

OceanMOOC | 8.2 | Fisheries Economics and Management

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Fisheries Stock Assessment Modelling Video 12 - Fisheries Economics

Ensuring Australian fisheries are not only environmentally sustainable but also financially sustainable is critical to maintaining a long term industry. In this video we overview some basics about fisheries economics and how setting a maximum economic yield for a fishery not only means higher profits for fishers but also, more sustainable fish stocks.

Maximising economic yield in fisheries

Project MYFISH - Maximising economic yield in fisheries

MYFISH launch meeting, research project on sustainable fisheries management in place under the 7th Framework Programme of the European Union and 31 participating institutions across Europe. The meeting will run until Thursday 26 and will involve around 100 professionals from various universities and research centers in Europe. Video available at:
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The Economics of Fisheries

Update: This lecture replaces the video with John Reynolds, who worried that his lecture on fisheries science (he's a biologist) and policy might offend some people.

I gave this guest lecture to a class on fisheries *science* so they'd have an idea about the economics affecting their topic. Sorry for off-camera (and bad sound) discussion and questions

Economics Tutoring Series - Fisheries and the Gordon Model

In this video, we introduce using a logarithmic growth function to model a fishery and determine maximum sustainable yield and bioeconomic equilibrium. We then use the Gordon Model to determine effort levels in group optimum/monopoly, maximum sustainable yield, and open access situations.

Maximum Sustainable Yield for Logistic Growth.(Hindi)

This video shows the Maximum Sustainable Yield for a Logistic Growth.

Introduction to Logistic Curve:

Deriving the rate constant:

maximum sustainable yield

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maximum sustainable yield
Maximum Sustainable Yield. After Caddy (1993) three distinct management strategies exist. direct fishing effort control. Advantages and disadvantages. I.Constant catch quotas to achieve TRPs. constant escapement policy. less reliable due to the unrecorded catches and high discards. Slideshow 3060381 by ova
show1 : Maximum sustainable yield

show2 : Advantages and disadvantages

show3 : Targets and limits

show4 : Maximum sustainable yield

show5 : Maximum sustainable yield

show6 : Maximum sustainable yield

show7 : Maximum sustainable yield

show8 : Ices fmsy framework long or medium lived species

show9 : Maximum sustainable yield

show10 : Data limited stocks

show11 : Do not act mechanically

show12 : F msy as a lrp

show13 : Opinions

show14 : Precautionary approach
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What is MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD? What does MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD mean?

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What is MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD? What does MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD mean? MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD meaning - MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD definition - MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD explanation.

Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under license.

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In population ecology and economics, maximum sustainable yield or MSY is theoretically, the largest yield (or catch) that can be taken from a species' stock over an indefinite period. Fundamental to the notion of sustainable harvest, the concept of MSY aims to maintain the population size at the point of maximum growth rate by harvesting the individuals that would normally be added to the population, allowing the population to continue to be productive indefinitely. Under the assumption of logistic growth, resource limitation does not constrain individuals’ reproductive rates when populations are small, but because there are few individuals, the overall yield is small. At intermediate population densities, also represented by half the carrying capacity, individuals are able to breed to their maximum rate. At this point, called the maximum sustainable yield, there is a surplus of individuals that can be harvested because growth of the population is at its maximum point due to the large number of reproducing individuals. Above this point, density dependent factors increasingly limit breeding until the population reaches carrying capacity. At this point, there are no surplus individuals to be harvested and yield drops to zero. The maximum sustainable yield is usually higher than the optimum sustainable yield and maximum economic yield.

MSY is extensively used for fisheries management. Unlike the logistic (Schaefer) model, MSY has been refined in most modern fisheries models and occurs at around 30% of the unexploited population size. This fraction differs among populations depending on the life history of the species and the age-specific selectivity of the fishing method.

However, the approach has been widely criticized as ignoring several key factors involved in fisheries management and has led to the devastating collapse of many fisheries. As a simple calculation, it ignores the size and age of the animal being taken, its reproductive status, and it focuses solely on the species in question, ignoring the damage to the ecosystem caused by the designated level of exploitation and the issue of bycatch. Among conservation biologists it is widely regarded as dangerous and misused.

Maximum sustainable yield | Wikipedia audio article

This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:



00:02:45 1 History
00:05:48 2 Modelling MSY
00:05:58 2.1 Population growth
00:12:55 2.2 MSY model
00:21:56 2.3 For demographically structured populations
00:23:36 2.4 Implications of MSY model
00:25:13 2.5 Uses of MSY
00:26:15 2.6 Limitations of MSY approach
00:29:14 2.6.1 Orange roughy
00:29:53 3 Overfishing
00:31:17 4 Optimum sustainable yield
00:32:17 5 See also



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SUMMARY
=======
In population ecology and economics, maximum sustainable yield or MSY is theoretically, the largest yield (or catch) that can be taken from a species' stock over an indefinite period. Fundamental to the notion of sustainable harvest, the concept of MSY aims to maintain the population size at the point of maximum growth rate by harvesting the individuals that would normally be added to the population, allowing the population to continue to be productive indefinitely. Under the assumption of logistic growth, resource limitation does not constrain individuals' reproductive rates when populations are small, but because there are few individuals, the overall yield is small. At intermediate population densities, also represented by half the carrying capacity, individuals are able to breed to their maximum rate. At this point, called the maximum sustainable yield, there is a surplus of individuals that can be harvested because growth of the population is at its maximum point due to the large number of reproducing individuals. Above this point, density dependent factors increasingly limit breeding until the population reaches carrying capacity. At this point, there are no surplus individuals to be harvested and yield drops to zero. The maximum sustainable yield is usually higher than the optimum sustainable yield and maximum economic yield.
MSY is extensively used for fisheries management. Unlike the logistic (Schaefer) model, MSY has been refined in most modern fisheries models and occurs at around 30% of the unexploited population size. This fraction differs among populations depending on the life history of the species and the age-specific selectivity of the fishing method.
However, the approach has been widely criticized as ignoring several key factors involved in fisheries management and has led to the devastating collapse of many fisheries. As a simple calculation, it ignores the size and age of the animal being taken, its reproductive status, and it focuses solely on the species in question, ignoring the damage to the ecosystem caused by the designated level of exploitation and the issue of bycatch. Among conservation biologists it is widely regarded as dangerous and misused.
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Maximum sustainable yield

Quality video

Bioeconomics of Sustainable Fisheries

(Visit: Globally, over the past century, coastal fisheries have faced overharvesting and mismanagement. California is no exception. This video recounts stories from fishermen, and others engaged in commercial fisheries, about the decades-long struggle to replenish stocks through a variety of management measures. Through their experiences, we discover the many successes in recovering stocks, the capricious nature of the biology of some species, and also emerging challenges for managing fisheries sustainably, including climate change, regional resources management, access, and local infrastructure. Successfully managing the complex 'bioeconomic' dynamics of coupled natural and human ecosystems, such as fisheries, will provide an ongoing challenge of paramount importance for the survival of vibrant coastal communities. Series: Sustainable California [Show ID: 33987]

Glossary: Maximum Sustainable Yield

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Population Growth - 6 Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY)

In this video lecture we will learn about Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) and see an important derivation and condition.

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All the Fish in the Sea Maximum Sustainable Yield and the Failure of Fisheries Management

Fishing

020 - Fishing

In this video Paul Andersen explains how various techniques have been used for years to collect seafood. Commercial fishing has led to overfishing in certain areas and species due to the tragedy of the commons. An explanation of aquaculture and sustainable fish yield is also included.

Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos:


Music Attribution

Intro
Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav
Artist: CosmicD
Link to sound:
Creative Commons Atribution License

Outro
Title: String Theory
Artist: Herman Jolly


All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing:

Bjørkan, T. (2010). English: Fish cages in Velfjorden, Brønnøy, Norway. Retrieved from
Con-struct. (2013a). English: Global total wild fish capture and aquaculture production in million tonnes, as reported by the FAO. Retrieved from
Con-struct. (2013b). English: Global total wild fish capture and aquaculture production in million tonnes, as reported by the FAO. Retrieved from
CZ, P. R. from P. (2006). Traditional fish traps, Hà Tây, Vietnam. Retrieved from
Epipelagic. (2012a). English: Global wild fish capture in million tonnes, 1950–2010, as reported by the FAO. Based on data sourced from the FishStat database. Retrieved from
Epipelagic. (2012b). English: Time series for the collapse of the Atlantic northwest cod stock. Retrieved from
Fg2. (2005). English: Ama (pearl diver) in Japan. Retrieved from
File:Seineak.JPG. (2012, March 21). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from
Gagnon, B. (2006). Français : Pêcheurs sur échasses près de Unawatuna, Sri Lanka. Retrieved from
Hammond, K. (Unknown date). Aquaculture - workers harvest catfish from the Delta Pride Catfish farms in Mississippi. Retrieved from
Health, N. I. for O. S. and. (2013). English: Boat fishing for crabs in the Bering Sea. Retrieved from
Inaglory, B. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). English: Spear fisherman in Hawaii. Retrieved from
India, C. E. V. from C. (2007). English: A fisherman in Kerala, India. A fisherman casting a net in Kerala, India. Retrieved from
jjron. (2009). English: Fishermen jigging for squid with jiggerpoles off the historic Queenscliff Pier in the early evening. Retrieved from
Lamiot. (2010). English: Collapse of Atlantic cod stocks off the East Coast of Newfoundland in 1992. Retrieved from
Pararas-Carayannis, D. G. (2000). English: Aquaculture’s effect on the environment. Retrieved from
Rojas, C. O. (1997). English: About 400 tons (360 t) of Chilean jack mackerel (Trachurus murphyi) are caught by a Chilean purse seiner off of Peru. Retrieved from
Sitting man fishing - Free People icons. (n.d.). Retrieved October 19, 2015, from
(n.d.). Retrieved from

Sustainable fisheries strategy

For more information and to download the Sustainable Fisheries Strategy, visit the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries website at

Maximum Sustainable Yield for Growing Algae

There are a couple of ways to harvest your algae. The best way is to harvest at your maximum sustainable yield point. You can either do this continuously by siphoning off an amount of algae that allows your bioreactor to grow nonstop, or you can harvest off a specific volume then restart your bioreactor with the remaining algae.

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