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Flu Attack! How A Virus Invades Your Body | Krulwich Wonders | NPR

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Flu Attack! How A Virus Invades Your Body | Krulwich Wonders | NPR

When you get the flu, viruses turn your cells into tiny factories that help spread the disease. In this animation, NPR's Robert Krulwich and medical animator David Bolinsky explain how a flu virus can trick a single cell into making a million more viruses.

See and hear the rest of the story on NPR.org:

Credit: Robert Krulwich, David Bolinsky, Jason Orfanon

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use for further information.


For permission to reuse this video, visit our permissions pages at npr.org
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How a Virus Works

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When flu viruses attack! | Infectious diseases | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy

Learn how flu viruses get into and out of your cells using Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase proteins on their surface. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Rishi Desai.

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Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.”

About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything.

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Influenza Virus Microbiology Animation

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Influenza virus

A group of RNA viruses of the Orthomyxoviridae family. Transmission is predominantly airborne, typically in winter. Serotypes A and B are virulent in humans and are the causative agents for the annual flu epidemic.

Capsid : Helical

Genitic structure : -ssRNA (8 segments)

Three pathogenic types
Influenzavirus A
Influenzavirus B
Influenzavirus C

Subtypes are differentiated by cell surface antigens hemagglutinin and neuraminidase (e.g., H1N1 is swine flu)
Hemagglutinin (H): promotes viral entry by binding to sialic acid residues
Neuraminidase (N): promotes the release of virion progeny from host cells by cleaving terminal sialic acid residues

High antigen variability through antigenic drift and antigenic shift
Two forms of vaccines against influenza viruses A and B: inactivated and live attenuated

Disease : Influenza : A highly contagious, viral infection that typically occurs during the winter months. Manifestations include sudden-onset high fever, headache, rhinorrhea, nonproductive cough, malaise, and myalgia.

#influenzavirusmicrobiologyanimation #influenzavirus #influenza
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Influenza Attack! How A Virus Invades Your Body Krulwich Wonders by NPR

When you get the flu, viruses turn your cells into tiny factories that help spread the disease. In this animation, NPR's Robert Krulwich and medical animator David Bolinsky explain how a flu virus can trick a single cell into making a million more viruses.

See and hear the rest of the story on NPR.org:

Credit: Robert Krulwich, David Bolinsky, Jason Orfanon

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use for further information.


For permission to reuse this video, visit our permissions pages at npr.org


Owner is : NPR

NPR Science: The Crow Paradox | Krulwich Wonders | NPR

Here's a surprise: Wild crows can recognize individual people ... especially those they don't like. They can pick a person out of crowd, follow them, and remember them for years. Here, NPR Science Correspondent Robert Krulwich and illustrator Neil Wagner look at how these brainy birds do it.

Hear the rest of the story, and play an interactive game that tests your ability to pick a crow out of a line-up at:

Credit: Robert Krulwich, Neil Wagner, Jason Orfanon

A Virus Attacks a Cell

The beginning of infection. Learn more at
Play a Kahoot! trivia game based on this animation. Visit

SwineFlu Influenza H1N1 Mechanism of Action MOA Animation

A 3D Medical Animations illustrating how Swine Flu H1N1 influenza virus infects the respiratory system and attacks the healthy cells? Read More -

Flu Attack! How A Virus Invades Your Body and how to recover it in easy steps

When you get the flu, viruses turn your cells into tiny factories that help spread the disease. In this animation, NPR's Robert Krulwich and medical animator David Bolinsky explain how a flu virus can trick a single cell into making a million more viruses.


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Behind the Headline: Curing the Common Cold

Virus Animation Credit: Animation courtesy Zirus/XVIVO
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Mutation Image Sequence Credit: J.Y. Srgo
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Robert Krulwich: Why Can't We Walk Straight? | Krulwich Wonders | NPR

Try as you might, you can't walk in a straight line without a visible guide point, like the Sun or a star. You might think you're walking straight, but as NPR's Robert Krulwich reports, a map of your route would reveal you are doomed to walk in circles.

Robert Krulwich: A Word Puzzle | Krulwich Wonders | NPR

You may have to watch it more than once, but see if you can find the words hiding in this video. There are at least a half-dozen. Seek 'em out and report back.

How Ebola Virus Infects a Cell

This 3-D animation shows how the Ebola virus exploits a naturally occurring protein in our cells called NPC1 to cause infection and spread in the body. Narrated by Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., professor of microbiology & immunology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Link to full video:


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#ebola #EbolaVirus #Animation

Fighting flu

This video illustrates how the flu virus works.

In order to spread in the body, the flu virus first uses a protein, called hemagglutinin, to bind to the healthy cell's receptors. Once it has inserted its RNA and replicated, the virus uses an enzyme, called neuraminidase, to sever the connection and move on to the next healthy cell.

Current flu drugs stop the virus from moving on to the next cell by preventing neuraminidase from cutting its ties with the infected cell, thus binding it to the infected cell and allowing the immune system to clear it away.

A new class of flu drug developed at UBC latches onto the neuraminidase like a broken key, stuck in a lock, rendering it useless and has been shown to be effective against drug resistant strains of the flu virus.

For more information, visit

Entry of Virus into Host Cell - Microbiology Animations

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Entry of Virus into Host Cell - Microbiology Animations

Viral entry into the host cell occurs by attachment of the G protein to cell surface receptors, followed by endocytosis via coated pits and low pH fusion of viral and endosomal membranes; all replication occurs in the cytoplasm.

#entryofvirusintohostcell #entryofvirusintocells #viralentry #microbiologyanimations
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How do Viruses Reproduce?

By taking over the machinery of human cells. Learn more at
Play a Kahoot! trivia game based on this animation. Visit

What does the flu do to the human body?

Influenza is a common viral infection that can be deadly. Here's a look at how the flu infects the body and produces symptoms. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube:

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High-Tech Images Show How Viruses Infect Cells

As people around the world contend with illnesses caused by viruses, including this year's strain of the flu or influenza, researchers continue to study how viruses work and how they manage to invade living cells in everything from bacteria to human organs. As VOA's Greg Flakus reports, University of Texas researchers recently collaborated on an innovative technique that allowed them to see a virus in the act of infecting a cell.

Flu fighters

Flu fighters exhibit at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2015: Finding new ways to stop flu in its tracks. Visit the Flu fighters exhibit at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2015:

Video thumbnail image: An electron microscope image of flu. Cutting-edge research could find new ways to combat the global spread of rapidly mutating viruses. Credit: The Roslin Institute.

Viruses - Part 3: Viral Replication Process

Viruses are transferred as particles, known as virions. Once the virion enters a host cell, it disassembles and the viral genome begins to interfere with cellular processes. The first stage of the intracellular phase of the viral replication cycle is cell entry.

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