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Francis Fukuyama: The Origins of the State: China and India

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Francis Fukuyama: The Origins of the State: China and India

Francis Fukuyama, director of the International Development Program, discussed this topic as part of his lecture series entitled, Getting to Denmark: Where the State, Rule of Law and Accountable Government Come From.
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Francis Fukuyama on The Origins of Political Order - John Adams Institute

One of America’s most distinguished political thinkers took the John Adams Institute stage for the second time to discuss his far-ranging exploration of history and society. Francis Fukuyama’s book is about how states form, but while it goes back into the distant past, its relevance is very up-to-date. How did ancient societies relinquish their tribal ties in favor of a strong central government? The West has long supported democracy as an organizing principle, and has pushed tribal societies to change. But how realistic is that? Francis Fukuyama also visited the John Adams Institute in 2014 and 1995.

Moderator: Frans Timmermans
In cooperation with Contact publishers

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This video was recorded on May 10, 2011.
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Francis Fukuyama: The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution

Francis Fukuyama, Stanford, analyzes the global history of state formation. Apr 28, 2011.
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Francis Fukuyama on Political Order and Political Decay

The political scientist explains how the West has developed strong states while the Middle East and Africa continue to struggle. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website:
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Francis Fukuyama (Conversations with History)

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Francis Fukuyama for a discussion of his new book, The Origins of Political Order. Fukuyama traces his intellectual odyssey, discusses the origins of The End of History thesis, and describes the influence of Samuel Huntington. Fukayama identifies his purpose in writing the new book, the importance of history and comparative studies to the development of his arguments, the relevance of insights from the biological sciences, and the role of ideas in institution building. He compares the evolution of the state in China and India and then assesses the relevance of the Chinese model of state power in an era of globalization. Series: Conversations with History [7/2011] [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 21952]

Francis Fukuyama: The Origins of Political Order

How does Francis Fukuyama view state formation, normative issues, and human behavior? Does he believe (as Andrew Carnegie did) that history moves in an upward direction and we can eventually put an end to war? This fascinating interview explores these questions and more.

BookTV: Francis Fukuyama, The Origins of Political Order

Francis Fukuyama, senior fellow at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, explores the origins of government. The author's range of study in the first of a two-part history ranges from the development of tribal societies to the earliest modern states in China and the rise of politics in Europe. Dr. Fukuyama presents a history of government at Politics & Prose Bookstore in Washington, D.C.

Conversations With History - Francis Fukuyama

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Francis Fukuyama for a discussion of his new book, The Origins of Political Order. Fukuyama traces his intellectual odyssey, discusses the origins of The End of History thesis, and describes the influence of Samuel Huntington. The conversation moves on to focus on the problem of political order. Fukayama identifies his purpose in writing the new book, the importance of history and comparative studies to the development of his arguments, the relevance of insights from the biological sciences, and the role of ideas in institution building. He compares the evolution of the state in China and India and then assesses the relevance of the Chinese model of state power in an era of globalization. He then offers an analysis of the neo-conservative agenda. He concludes with advice for students as they prepare for the future.

Lecture: The Origins of Political Order by Prof Francis Fukuyama

NOW READ THIS: The Origins of Political Order by Francis Fukuyama

Today I review a wonderful work on political philosophy and history by the legendary thinker Francis Fukuyama. Really great book! Definitely something you should pick up if you are interested in the development of our modern political systems and how we got to where we are now. It is a wealth of awesome knowledge and touches on WAAAAAY too many subjects to encompass in one review, but I hope it inspires and challenges you.

I will be reviewing his sequential volume, Political Order and Political Decay as soon as I have the time to read it!

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The 'End of History' Revisited | Francis Fukuyama

Frank Fukuyama's 1992 book The End of History and the Last Man had profound and lasting impact with its declaration that science and technology, the growing global economy, and liberal democracy are leading history in a quite different direction than Marx and Hegel imagined. In this revisit to those themes, Fukuyama examines conflict with and within Islam, the need for a diffuse form of global governance to deal with problems like climate change, and the deeper implications of biotechnology.

'The End of History' Revisited was given on June 28, 02007 as part of Long Now's Seminar series. The series was started in 02003 to build a compelling body of ideas about long-term thinking from some of the world's leading thinkers. The Seminars take place in San Francisco and are curated and hosted by Stewart Brand. To follow the talks, you can:

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[Lecture] Francis Fukuyama on the Political Order and Political Decay of China and the United States

This is the first part of the S.T. Lee Distinguished Lecture, where Prof Francis Fukuyama talks about his new book on Political Order and Political Decay in political institutions, particularly on China and the US.

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Prof Francis Fukuyama believes that a modern effective state should serve public issues and keep public interest from the private rulers than in patrimonial state. A modern state will be built around three institutions:
1) a state which concentrates and uses power,
2) the rule of law which constrains the powerful, and
3) mechanisms of democratic accountability to ensure that power is used for public rather than private benefit.

China invented state modernity but has failed to develop adequate institutions of constraint, while the American tradition has focused on constraints to state power at the expense of state effectiveness. Prof Francis Fukuyama uses the three constitutions for a modern state to explain what are the advantages and disadvantages for China and the US, and the ability of the two societies to adjust their balance of institutions, which will determine the dominant model for the future.

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In the second part of the lecture, which consists of the Q&A section, Prof Francis Fukuyama accepts and answers questions from the floor related to democracy, culture, state power, trust in nations, strong leadership, and the changes in his views now compared to those written in his previous books.

Cick here to watch the second part of the lecture:

The Origins of the State of India by Francis Fukuyama Part-1 of 3

Watch Part-2 here:

Francis Fukuyama explains the foundation on which the Indian civilization was created.

The Origins of the State of India by Francis Fukuyama Part-2 of 3

Watch Part-3 here:

Francis Fukuyama explains the foundation on which the Indian civilization was created.

Francis Fukuyama: India vs. China

Francis Fukuyama looks at Indian and Chinese history to assess which emerging market to invest in.

This Carnegie Council event took place on May 2, 2011. For complete video, audio, and transcript, go to:
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The Origins of the State of India by Francis Fukuyama Part-3 of 3

Watch Part-1 here:

Francis Fukuyama explains the foundation on which the Indian civilization was created.

Under Xi China transformed from authoritarian to totalitarian: Francis Fukuyama

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Francis Fukuyama, political scientist, author, and senior fellow at Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute, was the guest at ThePrint's Off The Cuff. Fukuyama talked about how under Chinese President Xi Jinping China has transitioned from an ordinary authoritarian one to a totalitarian one. Fukuyama decodes the reasons behind China’s recent assertive behaviour against India. And how he think India has taken a wrong path under Prime Minister Narendra Modi, and social harmony is necessary for any country that wants to develop a strong foreign policy. He also talks about growing intolerance on both the Left and the Right.


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China and the Modern State | Francis Fukuyama

A great flood at the dawn of Chinese civilization, around 2,000 BC, was said to have swept away settlements, the water rising so high that it overran hills, mountains and even heaven itself. The legend tells that the divine King Yu, with the help of a tortoise and a dragon, tamed the waters by building ditches and dams, thus earning a mandate to rule and laying the foundation for China’s first dynasty, the Xia.

Now, a team of scientists led by Chinese seismologist Wu Qianlong, says there's evidence that a flood did indeed submerge a vast swathe of the country almost 4,000 years ago. In the Jishi Gorge, in what is now Qinghai province, they found remnants of a landslide caused by an earthquake, big enough to block the Yellow River. The pent-up river formed a big lake over several months that eventually breached the dam, believed to have been slightly smaller than the Hoover Dam, unleashing a cataclysm powerful enough to flood land 2,000 km downstream. It's among the largest known floods to have happened on earth during the past 10,000 years, says geologist Darryl Granger.

In 2008, Wu traveled 25 kilometers downstream from the gorge, where the earthquake had destroyed numerous cave dwellings in a Neolithic settlement called Lajia. Subsequently, a thick layer of mud engulfed the ruins and the victims, which until now had preserved them for discovery. Wu found that the Lajia mud matched material from the Jishi Gorge, suggesting that the same earthquake that had destroyed the dwellings had also triggered the upstream landslide that set the stage for the flood. Deep cracks in the ground opened by the quake were filled by mud typical of a flood, indicating that the earthquake and flood must have occurred in the same year.

The researchers put the Yellow river flood at about 1920 BC by carbon dating the skeletons of children in a group of 14 victims found in Lajia. Because children grow so quickly, their bones give a very accurate and reliable age at the time of their death. The three skeletons we dated and two others all agree perfectly well, and they tell us that the flood happened at 1922 BC, plus or minus about 28 years, Dr. Granger said. So this coincides remarkably well with the major cultural transition in China.

The dates for the flood places the start of the Xia dynasty later than previously thought, in 1900 BC, rather than 2000 BC or earlier, as some timelines suggest. This means the dynasty existed squarely in the early Bronze Age, rather than the late Stone Age as previously though. The timing of the flood also marks the transition from the neolithic period to the early Bronze Age in China — a cultural shift with huge implications. About this time, urban areas and walled settlements appeared, including Erlitou, an archaeological site that has been linked to the Xia Dynasty (but has never been confirmed through archaeological evidence).

This is the first scientific evidence of not only China's Great Flood, but the existence of King Yu and the Xia dynasty itself, lending weight to the longstanding though controversial theory that the Xia Dynasty existed as China’s first unified state. Xia's existence has been contentious among archaeologists, because the only records of the Xia and the deluge were written about 1,000 years after the events were supposed to have happened. A compelling detail, however, is that the historical texts put Yu's efforts to stem the floodwaters in an area called Jishi.

Without written records tied directly to the civilization, some have said that the facts of the Xia have been inflated or outright fictionalized to shore up subsequent dynastic leaders and the 'mandate of heaven' that allowed them to rule. But if the legend is true, it means that this flood gave rise to one of the world's oldest and most enduring civilizations, enhancing our understanding of how catastrophes have shaped and guided human progress.
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Francis Fukuyama: China vs. United States

Francis Fukuyama discusses the differences in political development between the United States and China.

This Carnegie Council event took place on May 2, 2011. For complete video, audio, and transcript, go to:

[Live Webcast] Francis Fukuyama on Political Order and Political Decay: China and the United States

In this S.T. Lee Distinguished Lecture, Prof Francis Fukuyama talks about Political Order and Political Decay: China and the United States.


A modern state is built around three institutions: a state which concentrates and uses power, the rule of law which constrains the powerful, and mechanisms of democratic accountability to ensure that power is used for public rather than private benefit.

There is a great deal of instability in the current international system due to state weakness and incoherence. China and the US are, in some sense, at opposite poles in the scale of political order and decay.

China invented state modernity but has failed to develop adequate institutions of constraint, while the American tradition has focused on constraints to state power at the expense of state effectiveness. The ability of the two societies to adjust their balance of institutions will determine the dominant model for the future.

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