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Gen. Musharraf: No proof bin Laden was in Pakistan

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Musharraf commenting on Osama bin Laden

1. Pakistan's President General Pervez Musharraf walking down the stairs with Dutch officials and walking to podium
2. Cutaway Pakistani Information minister Sheikh Rashid Ahmed
3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gen. Pervez Musharraf, Pakistani President (answering about evidence gathered by Pakistani authorities to claim that Osama bin Laden is alive):
Evidence is interrogation of people that we have apprehended and also there was technological evidence, it's a combination of both.
4. Mid shot of Pakistani officials
5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gen. Pervez Musharraf, Pakistani President (answering about evidence gathered by Pakistani authorities to claim that Osama bin Laden is alive):
We have a lot of intelligence, intelligence is human intelligence as evidence, is technological intelligence and aerial surveillance, all combined you produce an intelligence picture, and that's how it happened and other than that, as I said, interrogation details of important personalities who we apprehended.
(Question: So you know where he is right now?)
No, no, I don't know where he (Osama bin Laden) is, I wish I knew. (laughs)
6. Wide of Musharraf at podium with Dutch officials

STORYLINE:

Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf said on Monday that interrogations and technological intelligence suggested that Al Qaida leader Osama bin Laden was still alive.

Evidence is interrogation of people that we have apprehended and also there was technological evidence, Musharraf told the press in the Hague, when asked about Bin Laden's fate.

But despite all the intelligence, Musharraf said he was uncertain about bin Laden whereabouts. Oh no, I don't know where he is, he said. I wish I did.

President Musharraf hailed the killing of Amjad Hussain Farooqi on Sunday as a breakthrough and predicted it would lead to
more high-profile al-Qaida arrests.

Shot dead during a four-hour gunbattle after vowing never to surrender, Farooqi was wanted for his alleged role in the 2002 kidnapping and beheading of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl and in two assassination attempts on Musharraf in December 2003. Three other Pakistanis, one of them an Islamic cleric, were arrested.

Pakistan has arrested more than 600 al-Qaida suspects, including several senior figures in the terror network. Many have been handed over to U.S. authorities.

Al-Qaida chief Osama bin Laden and his No. 2, Ayman al-Zawahri, are both believed to be hiding in the mountains between Pakistan and Afghanistan, though there has been no hard evidence of their location for years.

Musharraf's decision to ally Pakistan with Washington's campaign against international terrorism has enraged Islamic militants, and police stepped up patrols Monday in case of a backlash over Farooqi's death in Nawabshah, a town about 125 miles north of Karachi.


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PAKISTAN: GENERAL MUSHARRAF PRESS CONFERENCE

(26 May 2000) Natural Sound
For the first time since toppling Pakistan's civilian government, General Pervez Musharraf on Thursday unequivocally said he would return the country to democratic rule in three years.
Two weeks ago, the Supreme Court ordered a return to democratic rule in Pakistan within three years and three months.
This is the Supreme Court decision,� Musharraf told reporters at a news conference in the federal capital, Islamabad.
The court order was part of a larger decision that upheld the military takeover in Pakistan last October 12.
The court said the army took power from a civilian government because it was corrupt and incompetent.
The Supreme Court also gave Musharraf sweeping powers to change Pakistan's constitution, something the army chief told reporters he would do.
Musharraf is believed to favour a constitution that gives the military a role in governing the country.
In a three-hour news conference, Musharraf promised sweeping political and economic reform and said the army would hand a progressive and prosperous Pakistan over to civilian rule.
On the international front, Musharraf said that although relations with neighbor India were not good, he was ready to talk to Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee.
The Himalayan region of Kashmir has been the flashpoint of two previous wars between India and Pakistan.
The two countries routinely exchange artillery and heavy weapons fire across the disputed border and there are increasing fears that the simmering dispute could erupt into an all-out confrontation.
The international community is pressuring the countries to open talks.
World leaders are particularly concerned because both countries exploded nuclear devises in 1998 and declared themselves nuclear powers.
Musharraf also warned Russia against carrying out airstrikes against Pakistan's neighbour, Afghanistan.
Both General Valery Manilov, first deputy head of the Russian general staff, and Russian Defence Minister Igor Sergeyev on Thursday reiterated Russia's readiness for possible air strikes on Afghanistan if the country continues alleged aid to Chechen rebels.
The prospect was raised this week after the Kremlin said it had acquired evidence of a deal between Afghanistan's ruling Taliban and suspected terrorist leader Osama bin Laden to aid the rebels.
SOUNDBITE: (English)
Yes, obviously, this is the Supreme Court judgement, which has to be accepted.
SUPER CAPTION: General Pervez Musharraf
SOUNDBITE: (English)
That if India does it, India must be restrained. If India does it, we should not be stopped. Then the onus will be on them, to have initiated another system of blasts. But we are not at all preparing. We don't want to carry out any tests, any nuclear tests at all.
SUPER CAPTION: General Pervez Musharraf
SOUNDBITE: (English)
I am sure Pakistan and India both are responsible enough to understand implications of nuclear power and are responsible enough to avoid any such confrontation which can lead to even the remotest possibility of the use of nuclear weapons.
SUPER CAPTION: General Pervez Musharraf
SOUNDBITE: (English)
It is certainly a very serious matter and I don't know the authenticity of this report, whether they are really contemplating an attack on Afghanistan, but I would certainly say that this will escalate the situation and it will make it one-sided, in favour of the northern alliance which should not be attempted because it can have very, very far reaching consequences in the other central Asian republics.
SUPER CAPTION: General Pervez Musharraf
APTN


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Pakistan surprised bin Laden was hiding near Islamabad

Terrell Brown spoke with Lara Logan on how the Pakistani people felt after finding out Osama bin Laden had been living near Islamabad before he was killed in a fortified compound by U.S. forces.
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The State of the U.S.-Pakistan Relationship: A Discussion with Pervez Musharraf

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A Conversation with Pervez Musharraf

ORIGINALLY RECORDED November 2, 2011

Pervez Musharraf, former president of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, discusses his return to politics and analyzes the current government's relationship with the United States.

SPEAKERS:
Pervez Musharraf, Former President, Islamic Republic of Pakistan
James J. Shinn, Lecturer, Princeton University; Coauthor, Afghan Peace Talks: A Primer

A Conversation with Pervez Musharraf

ORIGINALLY RECORDED September 25, 2006

Watch Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf discuss his new memoir, terrorism, and U.S.-Pakistan relations.

SPEAKER:
General Pervez Musharraf, President, Islamic Republic of Pakistan
PRESIDER:
Robert E. Rubin, Director, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Citigroup Inc.; Vice Chairman; Council on Foreign Relations

How pakistan's top official find out about Killing of Usama bin Ladin

Hina Rabbani Khar is telling the story of how pakistan's Prime minister, president, chief of army, ISI cheif and foreign minister found about the killing of osama bin ladin in Abbottabad.

Manhunt: The Ten Year Search for Osama bin Laden: From 9/11 to Abbottabad, Peter Bergen

One of the few Westerners to interview Osama bin Laden, Peter Bergen, a CNN national security analyst, discussed his recent book, Manhunt: The Ten Year Search for Osama bin Laden: From 9/11 to Abbottabad, at the Honorable T. Linus Hoban Memorial Forum at The University of Scranton. The lecture took place Thursday, Oct. 25, at 7 p.m. in the McIlhenny Ballroom of the DeNaples Center on campus. The lecture was sponsored by The Lackawanna Bar Association and The University of Scranton.

Adds Pakistani Foreign Ministry reax to Taliban announcement

1. Exterior of Taliban embassy
2. Abdul Salam Zaeef seated with translator at news conference
3. Cutaway of journalists
4. SOUNDBITE: (Pashtu/English translation) Abdul Salam Zaeef, Taliban ambassador to Pakistan The books of our school of religion write that if infidels attack the territory of a country of Muslims, jihad becomes an Islamic obligation for the Muslims of that country.
5. Cutaway of journalists
6. SOUNDBITE: (English translation) Abdul Salam Zaeef, Taliban ambassador to Pakistan This is... was a very complicated incident. There are many probabilities... who are the real culprits behind this event (the terror attacks on the United States). If there is no evidence in proof given to us, we will not be ready to give Osama bin Laden without any proof.
7. Various of journalists
8. SOUNDBITE: (English translation) Abdul Salam Zaeef, Taliban ambassador to Pakistan This (the departure of bin Laden from Afghanistan) is a suggestion by the Ulema. It is not a decision by a judge. I wanted to clarify this. Furthermore, our position in this regard is that if America has evidence and proof they should produce it. We are ready for the trial of Osama bin Laden in the light of evidence.
9. Cutaway of journalists
10. SOUNDBITE: (English translation) Abdul Salam Zaeef, Taliban ambassador to Pakistan It would then be a showdown of might. But if America tries once to prove, we are ready to cooperate, as we always said. But if they capitalise on the familiarity of Osama and level such allegations, that would be another motive of them, or even if the American FBI and other agencies want to escape the (inaudible) of 5,000 people killed - and for that reason they want to put the blame on Osama bin Laden - that would not be that they are really trying to capture the real culprit. As we said, we would cooperate if they really want to know the real culprit, but if they want to show their might, and are resorting to power and might, it should be well known that we will never surrender to evil and might.
11. Wide shot of news conference
12. Wide of news conference in Pakistan Foreign Ministry
13. SOUNDBITE: (English) Riaz Mohamed Khan, Pakistani Foreign Ministry spokesman The government of Pakistan has taken note of the recommendation of the Afghan Ulema, advising their government to persuade Osama bin Laden to voluntarily leave Afghanistan. We hope that the Taliban leadership, keeping in view the gravity of the situation, will take a prompt decision which is in the interests of Afghanistan and its people and which satisfies the concerns and demands of the international community.
14. Cutaway of journalists (mute)

STORYLINE:

Afghanistan's Taliban rulers have refused to hand over alleged terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden, warning that U-S attempts to apprehend him by force could plunge the region into crisis.

The refusal by the hard-line Afghan leadership, which has sheltered bin Laden for the last five years, was announced at a news conference in Islamabad on Friday by the Taliban ambassador to Pakistan.

He spoke after U-S President George W Bush warned that Afghanistan must hand over bin Laden and his lieutenants or they will share their fate.

There was no sign that Bush's warning was enough to convince Afghanistan's rulers to move against bin Laden, the prime suspect in the September 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington.

Speaking through a translator, the ambassador said the Taliban was ready to put bin Laden on trial, but only if the United States provided evidence of his guilt.

He also said he had no information on bin Laden's current whereabouts.


He also called for an investigation by the United Nations, saying President Bush's ultimatum posed a great danger for Muslims.





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Taliban continue to deny Bin Laden involovement

1. Various of people on street outside Taliban Embassy
2. Abdul Salam Zaeef walks into conference room
3. Various of press conference
4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Abdul Salam Zaeef, Taliban ambassador to Pakistan
Osama has no pilots. Where did he train them? Training of pilots is the work of a running government and only such a government has the capacity to do so. In Afghanistan, there is no such possibility for the training.
5. Various of journalists
6. Zaeef speaking at press conference
7. Cutaway of journalists
8. Mothers of American aid workers arriving outside embassy (Deborah Oddy in black, with Nancy Cassell)
9. Father of Heather Mercer, detainee
9. Mothers in conversation
10. People looking at newspapers on street
11. Various close-up shots of newspapers
12. Various of men looking at newspapers
13. SOUNDBITE: (Urdu) Voxpop
In my opinion, what happened is very bad and not good and whoever has done this they want to weaken America internally. Just to destroy bad image of muslims around the world. Whatever has been done is beyond the means of Afghanistan or any muslim country.
14. Various Islamabad street scenes
15. Exterior of Islamabad Airport
16. Travellers waiting at airport
17. Sign showing cancelled flights
18. Flight display showing cancelled flights
18. Various of travellers waiting to board flights
STORYLINE:
Afghanistan's ruling Taliban warned on Friday that any military attack by the United States would lead to acts of revenge.
Leading fundamentalist clerics used Friday prayers in Kabul to press Muslims worldwide into action, calling for a unified front in response to any U-S-led retaliation for Tuesday's terror attacks on New York and Washington.
In Islamabad, Abdul Salam Zaeef, the Taliban ambassador to Pakistan, explained why the Taliban believed Osama bin Laden was not responsible for the devastating attacks.
Alleged terrorist bin Laden has been identified by Secretary of State Colin Powell as the number one suspect in the attacks against New York's World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
But Abdul Salam Zaeef, speaking in Islamabad, said bin Laden had neither the capacity nor the resources to have orchestrated the attacks.
Reading from a statement by the reclusive leader of Afghanistan's ruling Taliban militia, Mullah Mohammed Omar, he said investigators were trying to link bin Laden to
this week's attacks unjustifiably and without any reason.
In the statement read aloud by the ambassador on Friday, Omar said the attacks themselves point to bin Laden's innocence because Osama has no pilots and because there is no pilot training in Afghanistan.
Abdul Salam Zaeef, the Afghan ambassador to Pakistan, told reporters in the Pakistani capital of Islamabad that handing over bin Laden to the United States would be a long process. It would have to involve U.S. authorities providing evidence against bin Laden to the Taliban.
So far the Americans have not contacted us on providing any evidence. Our position is very clear. We have condemned the attacks, he said.
Moreover, the West had no proof of his involvement, he added.
Afghanistan's strict Muslim Taliban rulers have given haven to bin Laden and his allies for years.
They have refused to hand over bin Laden, who also is wanted by Washington in the deadly bombings of two U-S embassies in East Africa in 1998.
Since Tuesday's attacks, there has been speculation about a U-S retaliatory strike against Afghanistan.
Foreign aid workers are streaming out of the country, heading for safer territory in neighboring Pakistan.
The flow of refugees out of Afghanistan - already high because of drought and civil war - has intensified since Tuesday's attacks.


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We trained Mujahideen, Laden was our hero: Ex-Pak Prez Musharraf

An undated video shows former Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf admitting that the country brought Mujahideen from around the world, trained them and gave them weapons. Musharraf said that terrorists like Osama bin Laden and Jalaluddin Haqqani used to be Pakistan's heroes. Then the environment was different but now it is different. Heroes have turned into villains, Musharraf further said. #sutathu,#mujahideenladen,#expakprezmusharraf,#world

British PM meets Musharraf + comments

En route to Islamabad from Moscow
1. Mid shot of plane wing
2. Blair talking with journalists on plane
3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Blair, British Prime Minister
It's increasingly clear that there is now a chance of getting some broad agreement for the post-Taliban regime if that is what it comes too and virtually everyone, including Russia and ourselves, and I believe Pakistan also, want to make sure that any successor regime is broad based and includes proper representation of all the ethnic groupings and gives some chance to the country of recovering from the miserable poverty stricken existence that is their present situation.
4. Cutaway photographer

Islamabad
5. Various of Blair and Musharraf at talks
6. Wide shot of Blair and Musharraf news conference
7. Cutaway cameraman
8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Blair, British Prime Minister
President Musharraf and I have had detailed and very worthwhile discussions. We have agreed that if the current Taliban regime fails to yield up bin Laden and it falls, then it's successor must be broad based and key ethnic grouping represented, including the Pastum and that Pakistan has a valid interest in close involvement in how such a successor regime be established. We've also agreed to restart UK-Pakistan defence co-operation, measures for bi-lateral assistance and to help the work towards a new IMF program for Pakistan - Pakistan having completed successfully the first phase of its present programme.
9. Cutaway media
10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Blair, British Prime Minister
The 11th of September has changed the world. Nations make their choices if they want to help in the fight against international terrorism or stand aside. I believe that Pakistan has made the right choice. The result will be a significant and lasting strengthening of the outside world's relations with Pakistan. We in Britain will play our full part we will not walk away, neither will others.
11. Cutaway Pakistan officials listening
12. SOUNDBITE: (English) General Pervez Musharraf, President of Pakistan
I personally condemn this human tragedy that occurred, and also condone with the US government on this tragedy. We exchanged notes on the issue of Afghanistan, on the issue of evidence. I personally, also my government feels that there is evidence leading to an association between this terrorist act and Osama bin Laden.
13. Cutaway official
14. Blair and Musharraf leaving news conference
15. Wide shot of car carrying Blair arriving for reception
16. Blair and Musharraf shaking hands

STORYLINE:

British Prime Minister Tony Blair said on Friday that Pakistan's decision to back U.S.-led efforts to combat terrorism would lead to improved relations with the rest of the world.

Speaking at a news conference in Islamabad following talks with President Gen. Pervez Musharraf, the British prime minister said Pakistan's decision will result in a significant and lasting strengthening of the outside world's relations with Pakistan.

We in Britain will play our full part we will not walk away, neither will others, Blair added.

General Pervez Musharraf said he believes the evidence was strong enough to link Osama bin Laden to the attacks.

Blair's in-and-out visit to Pakistan was to show support for Musharraf, who has backed the US-led campaign against terrorist suspect Osama bin Laden despite opposition from his country's Islamic parties.

Blair said he came to thank Pakistan for its stand and to make clear that any punitive action would not be directed against the Islamic world.


En route to Pakistan from Russia, Blair told reporters he was optimistic about reaching a broad agreement with Pakistan on a government for a post-Taliban Afghanistan.






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Pakistan Gov't Complicit In US Drone Strikes

New leaked documents reveal just how complex of an issue President Obama's use of drones in Pakistan has become. For years, America has been launching drone strikes in Pakistan with the consent and help of the Pakistani government, but this teamwork took place behind closed doors. Meanwhile, the same officials who worked with the CIA to target Pakistani militants would turn around and publicly denounce the strikes to appease the people of Pakistan - people who want their government to keep them secure, but are extremely skeptical of the United States' role in the region, especially after the Osama Bin Laden raid. But that operation - in which the US military flew multiple helicopters an hour into Pakistani territory, conducted an hour-long raid right next to the country's elite military academy, and then flew back over the border into Afghanistan without setting off any of the country's national security alarm bells, confirmed that the Pakistani government is largely inept and unable to maintain security over its own country. The assassination of Presidential candidate Benazir Bhutto in 2008 also confirmed these doubts. All of this breeds distrust between the people and their government and makes it understandable why the government would make it seem like they have nothing to do with President Obama's drone strikes.

New leaked documents reveal Pakistan endorsed US drone strikes:


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Musharraf denies 'secret deal' with US

Former Pakistan President Perverz Musharraf on Tuesday (May 10) denies the existence of any 'secret deal' with the US that allowed America to carry out a unilateral operation against Osama bin Laden on Pakistani soil. Download the Times Now India's Election HQ app and get all the election info at one go. Click here: Social Media Links :-

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British PM meets Musharraf + comments

En route to Islamabad from Moscow
1. Mid shot of plane wing
2. Blair talking with journalists on plane
3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Blair, British Prime Minister
It's increasingly clear that there is now a chance of getting some broad agreement for the post-Taliban regime if that is what it comes too and virtually everyone, including Russia and ourselves, and I believe Pakistan also, want to make sure that any successor regime is broad based and includes proper representation of all the ethnic groupings and gives some chance to the country of recovering from the miserable poverty stricken existence that is their present situation.
4. Cutaway photographer

Islamabad
5. Various of Blair and Musharraf at talks
6. Wide shot of Blair and Musharraf news conference
7. Cutaway cameraman
8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Blair, British Prime Minister
President Musharraf and I have had detailed and very worthwhile discussions. We have agreed that if the current Taliban regime fails to yield up bin Laden and it falls, then it's successor must be broad based and key ethnic grouping represented, including the Pastum and that Pakistan has a valid interest in close involvement in how such a successor regime be established. We've also agreed to restart UK-Pakistan defence co-operation, measures for bi-lateral assistance and to help the work towards a new IMF program for Pakistan - Pakistan having completed successfully the first phase of its present programme.
9. Cutaway media
10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Tony Blair, British Prime Minister
The 11th of September has changed the world. Nations make their choices if they want to help in the fight against international terrorism or stand aside. I believe that Pakistan has made the right choice. The result will be a significant and lasting strengthening of the outside world's relations with Pakistan. We in Britain will play our full part we will not walk away, neither will others.
11. Cutaway Pakistan officials listening
12. SOUNDBITE: (English) General Pervez Musharraf, President of Pakistan
I personally condemn this human tragedy that occurred, and also condone with the US government on this tragedy. We exchanged notes on the issue of Afghanistan, on the issue of evidence. I personally, also my government feels that there is evidence leading to an association between this terrorist act and Osama bin Laden.
13. Cutaway official
14. Blair and Musharraf leaving news conference
15. Wide shot of car carrying Blair arriving for reception
16. Blair and Musharraf shaking hands

STORYLINE:

British Prime Minister Tony Blair said on Friday that Pakistan's decision to back U.S.-led efforts to combat terrorism would lead to improved relations with the rest of the world.

Speaking at a news conference in Islamabad following talks with President Gen. Pervez Musharraf, the British prime minister said Pakistan's decision will result in a significant and lasting strengthening of the outside world's relations with Pakistan.

We in Britain will play our full part we will not walk away, neither will others, Blair added.

General Pervez Musharraf said he believes the evidence was strong enough to link Osama bin Laden to the attacks.

Blair's in-and-out visit to Pakistan was to show support for Musharraf, who has backed the US-led campaign against terrorist suspect Osama bin Laden despite opposition from his country's Islamic parties.

Blair said he came to thank Pakistan for its stand and to make clear that any punitive action would not be directed against the Islamic world.


En route to Pakistan from Russia, Blair told reporters he was optimistic about reaching a broad agreement with Pakistan on a government for a post-Taliban Afghanistan.






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Pressure on Pak to prove its innocence

Leaders across the world are putting pressure on Pakistan to make a full declaration of their role. Premiers of both UK & France have said that Pakistan needed to explain how Osama remained hidden in Pakistan all this while. Download the Times Now India's Election HQ app and get all the election info at one go. Click here: Social Media Links :-

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We Didn't Tell Pakistanis About Osama Because They Would Have Helped Him To Get Away - Ted Poe

US did not inform about the raid on Osama bin Laden to Pakistan because Pakistanis would have snitched the information to Osama and he would have gone away. Clip from the House Foreign Relations Committee's hearing of US Ambassador to Pakistan and State Department Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan Richard Olson on 16 December, 2015 on The Future of US-Pakistan Relations. Full video of the hearing -


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Straw presser, plus meeting foreign minister and Musharraf

AGENCY POOL
1. Various of Pakistani President General Pervez Musharraf and British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw meeting
2. Various of Musharraf and Straw sitting and talking

AGENCY POOL
3. Various of Straw meeting Pakistani Foreign Minister Abdul Sattar and ministry officials

APTN
4. Straw and Sattar entering news conference
5. Cutaway
6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jack Straw, British Foreign Secretary
Our position is very straightforward: that is that if people are ready to surrender, they are serious in that intention, they have given up their arms, and it is possible to accept their surrender then the surrender should be accepted. We all understand the potential humanitarian disaster that is possible in Kunduz. Making arrangements and in particular in the very confused circumstances could prove extremely difficult. It also has to said that if people have been fighting for the Taliban, as is the case with any other combatants in a similar conflict, then they stand to be detained if they are surrendered. They cannot expect to go free.
7. Cutaway
8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Jack Straw, British Foreign Secretary
They are themselves sending representatives to the meeting in Bonn and somebody who is fairly senior in the Northern Alliance and we hope, given what they have already said that we expect the Northern Alliance to continue to show a high degree of responsibility for securing a peaceful future in Afghanistan and that can only come about if there is give and take and if there is acceptance that no one party , no one ethnic group should have complete control of any government or administration.
9. Cutaway
10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Abdul Sattar, Pakistani Foreign Minister
Any Afghan who is prepared to support implementation of security council resolutions of 1999, December 2000 and September 12 and Oct 14 of this year should be considered eligible for consultation in the formation of a broad based government. Of course those people who are to be brought to prosecution for their part in the terrorism they are in a different class and these are the ones we consider to be extremists.
11. Wide of news conference

STORYLINE:

Frantic diplomatic efforts are continuing to arrange a round of power-sharing talks for a post-Taliban Afghan government next week in Bonn, Germany.

On Friday, British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw flew into Islamabad for talks with Pakistani President General Pervez Musharraf.

The meeting was aimed at shoring up support for a broad-based government to replace the Islamic extremists.

Straw later met Pakistani Foreign Minister Abdul Sattar.

After the talks, Straw appealed to Northern Alliance forces surrounding Kunduz to accept the surrender of people who want to escape the siege of the beleaguered northern Afghan city.

Sattar accepted that the situation in the city was potentially grave.


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The Talibanization of South Asia: Can it Be Stopped?

A talk by Pervez Hoodbhoy, Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad.Dr. Pervez Hoodbhoy received his bachelor's degrees in electrical engineering and mathematics, master's in solid state physics, and Ph.D in nuclear physics, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been a faculty member at the Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad since 1973. He is chairman of Mashal, a non-profit organization that publishes books in Urdu on women's rights, education, environmental issues, philosophy, and modern thought. Dr. Hoodbhoy has written and spoken extensively on topics ranging from science in Islam to education issues in Pakistan and nuclear disarmament. He produced a 13-part documentary series in Urdu for Pakistan Television on critical issues in education, and two other major television series aimed at popularizing science. He is author of Islam and Science: Religious Orthodoxy and the Battle for Rationality, now in 5 languages.His writings have appeared in Dawn, The News, Frontier Post, Muslim, Newsline, Herald, Jang, and overseas in Le Monde, Japan Times, Washington Post, Asahi, Seattle Times, Post-Intelligencer, Frontline, The Hindu, and Chowk Magazine. He has been an engaged speaker at more than twenty US campuses including MIT, Princeton, Univ. of Maryland, and Johns Hopkins University. He has appeared on several TV and radio networks (BBC, CNN, ABC, NBC, PBS, NPR, Fox) to analyze political developments in South Asia.

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CJP sends message to Pervez Musharraf that he won't be arrested on returning to Pak

CJP Saqib Nisar sends message to Former President Pervez Musharraf that he won't be arrested on returning to Pakistan

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