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Hidden Universe - Dark Matter - Full Documentary HD

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Dark Matter and Dark Energy Documentary - Space Documentary 2017

DARK MATTER NOVA SCIENCE DOCUMENTARY Discovery Life Universe (full length documentary)

AMAZON PRIME - FREE TRIAL SIGN UP: Dark Matter - PBS Documentary (full length documentary). Thanks for watching history life .



From a single point - the big bang brought into being space, time and an expanding plasma cloud of Hydrogen: the primal element, from which came Helium in .

Nova is a United States popular science television series produced by WGBH Boston. It is broadcast on Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) in the U.S., and in .

[NOVA SpaceNow] DARK MATTER: Space PBS Documentary updat 2015 HD Dark matter is a hypothetical kind of matter that cannot be seen with telescopes .
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How the Universe Works - The Dark Matter Enigma - Space Discovery Documentary

Explore the biggest question of all. How far do the stars stretch out into space? And what's beyond them? In modern times, we built giant telescopes that have allowed us to cast our gaze deep into the universe. Astronomers have been able to look back to near the time of its birth. They've reconstructed the course of cosmic history in astonishing detail. From intensive computer modeling, and myriad close observations, they've uncovered important clues to its ongoing evolution. Many now conclude that what we can see, the stars and galaxies that stretch out to the limits of our vision, represent only a small fraction of all there is. Does the universe go on forever? Where do we fit within it? And how would the great thinkers have wrapped their brains around the far-out ideas on today's cutting edge? For those who find infinity hard to grasp, even troubling, you're not alone. It's a concept that has long tormented even the best minds. Over two thousand years ago, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras and his followers saw numerical relationships as the key to understanding the world around them. But in their investigation of geometric shapes, they discovered that some important ratios could not be expressed in simple numbers. Take the circumference of a circle to its diameter, called Pi. Computer scientists recently calculated Pi to 5 trillion digits, confirming what the Greeks learned: there are no repeating patterns and no ending in sight. The discovery of the so-called irrational numbers like Pi was so disturbing, legend has it, that one member of the Pythagorian cult, Hippassus, was drowned at sea for divulging their existence. A century later, the philosopher Zeno brought infinity into the open with a series of paradoxes: situations that are true, but strongly counter-intuitive. In this modern update of one of Zeno's paradoxes, say you have arrived at an intersection. But you are only allowed to cross the street in increments of half the distance to the other side. So to cross this finite distance, you must take an infinite number of steps. In math today, it's a given that you can subdivide any length an infinite number of times, or find an infinity of points along a line. What made the idea of infinity so troubling to the Greeks is that it clashed with their goal of using numbers to explain the workings of the real world. To the philosopher Aristotle, a century after Zeno, infinity evoked the formless chaos from which the world was thought to have emerged: a primordial state with no natural laws or limits, devoid of all form and content. But if the universe is finite, what would happen if a warrior traveled to the edge and tossed a spear? Where would it go? It would not fly off on an infinite journey, Aristotle said. Rather, it would join the motion of the stars in a crystalline sphere that encircled the Earth. To preserve the idea of a limited universe, Aristotle would craft an historic distinction. On the one hand, Aristotle pointed to the irrational numbers such as Pi. Each new calculation results in an additional digit, but the final, final number in the string can never be specified. So Aristotle called it potentially infinite. Then there's the actually infinite, like the total number of points or subdivisions along a line. It's literally uncountable. Aristotle reserved the status of actually infinite for the so-called prime mover that created the world and is beyond our capacity to understand. This became the basis for what's called the Cosmological, or First Cause, argument for the existence of God. #universedocumentary #spacedocumentary #Universe

Science Documentary Dark Energy The Biggest Mystery in the Universe

Science Documentary -- Dark Energy The Biggest Mystery in the Universe.

Science Documentary | Dark Energy The Biggest Mystery in the Universe.

[Universe OST] Dark Energy: The Biggest Mystery in the Universe | Space & Universe Documentary Thank for watching! Don't forget to like and subscirbe.

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Dark Matter & Dark Energy the Invisible Universe - BBC Science Documentary Subscribe: .
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BBC 2017 Dark Matter, Dark Energy the Invisible Universe HD, Full Documentary 2017

BBC 2017 Dark Matter, Dark Energy the Invisible Universe HD, Full Documentary 2017 The Documentary Video belongs to Documentary Detective and . Discovery Science Universe (documentary) nova.

BBC 2017 Dark Matter, Dark Energy the Invisible Universe HD, Full Documentary 2017 The Documentary Video belongs to Documentary Detective and . BBC 2017 Dark Matter, Dark Energy the Invisible.

Universe Documentary -Biggest Black Holes - BBC Documentary 2017 || Documentray. Universe Documentary -Biggest Black Holes - BBC Documentary 2017 || Documentray. Monster Black Holes in the.

National Geographic: End of the Universe - Documentary HD

How and when will the Universe end? Gravity and dark matter are poised to annihilate the Universe in a big crunch. Expansion and dark energy may tear it apart. Or, a phase transition could kill us tomorrow in a cosmic death bubble. Thanks for watching Please Like, Share, Comment and Subscribe.
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Physics | Antimatter and Dark Matter

Dark matter is a theorized form of matter that is thought to account for approximately 80% of the matter in the universe, and about a quarter of its total energy density. The majority of dark matter is thought to be non-baryonic in nature, possibly being composed of some as-yet undiscovered subatomic particles. Dark matter has not been directly observed, but its presence is implied in a variety of astrophysical observations, including gravitational effects that cannot be explained unless more matter is present than can be seen. For this reason, most experts think dark matter to be ubiquitous in the universe and to have had a strong influence on its structure and evolution. The name dark matter refers to the fact that it does not appear to interact with observable electromagnetic radiation, such as light, and is thus invisible (or 'dark') to the entire electromagnetic spectrum, making it extremely difficult to detect using usual astronomical equipment.

No Dark Matter? - Documentary 2018 HD

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Dark Matter & Dark Energy in Hindi - Complete Information | क्या हैं डार्क मैटर और डार्क एनर्जी

क्या हैं डार्क मैटर और डार्क एनर्जी (What is Dark Matter & Dark Energy). If you are searching for Dark Matter Kya hai or Dark energy kya hai?, it simply means you want to know about Dark Energy & Dark Matter in Hindi. It's an Educational video on Universe and Cosmology.


This Episode on Dark Matter and Dark Energy is in Hindi and explains these two complex entities in the best possible way. Here is a simple introduction of Dark Energy.

In physical cosmology and astronomy, dark energy is an unknown form of energy which is hypothesized to permeate all of space, tending to accelerate the expansion of the universe.

Dark matter is a hypothetical type of matter distinct from baryonic matter (ordinary matter such as protons and neutrons), neutrinos and dark energy. The existence of dark matter would explain a number of otherwise puzzling astronomical observations.

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No Dark Matter Documentary HD

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Athene's Theory of Everything - Full Documentary HD

Human Brain And Quantum Physics - Full Documentary HD

Human Brain And Quantum Physics. Credits to ATHENE'S

the following documentary presents new developments in neuroscience and a solution to current unsolved problems in physics, Solely focused on scientifically verified data, it also has philosophical repercussions to life, death and the origins of universe.

Dr. Granville Dharmawardena of the University of Colombo writes that psychologists often speak of the mind and the body as two separate entities for convenience, but most acknowledge that they are intimately entwined. Yet none knows exactly how or how intimately. So the mind body problem keeps stubbornly resisting a definite solution. Philosopher John Searle (Mills Professor of Philosophy, University of California, and Berkley) says that today’s philosophers are reluctant to tackle such big problems as how people have been trying to understand their relationship to the universe.

All these refer to the elusive relationship between the body and the mind referred to more generally as the brain-mind problem. The brain-mind relationship has baffled mankind for a very long time. One main reason for this is that it was not considered as a candidate for scientific study until recently.

Psychology and related sciences were able to continue for many years by either ignoring the brain entirely or at best treating it as a black box whose rules of operation could be understood without reference to its internal contents or composition.

The human brain without doubt is the most complex organ in the known universe. It is physical and biological. Therefore, it has to be amenable to scientific probing without the intervention of such considerations as the Gödel’s theorem, which states that there are statements in mathematical systems which are true but cannot be proven within those systems.


Attempts to understand the brain-mind problem within Newton’s universe over centuries have introduced divisions and concepts that have become detrimental to having a new look at it from the point of view of modern science, more specifically quantum mechanics. . Just as the Earth was proved not to be the center of the universe, our current theories that govern our physical universe such as Einstein’s gravity theory and others may become obsolete in our understanding of reality. For example, astrophysicist can only account for about 10% of the matter in the universe. Dark matter was invented to account for the other 90%, but no one knows if dark matter even exists. Could it be that our theories are really 90% wrong, dark matter doesn’t exist, and there are actually other things that are beyond our current comprehensive ability that determine our perception of our universe and reality? Most likely, yes.

In trying to interpret the mechanisms of operation of the human brain and developing a model for consciousness that explain all practical observations, it is necessary first of all to jettison traditional thinking and clean up the mess created by human genius. It is also necessary to enlist all the observed properties of the brain and consciousness and ensure that the developed model explains all of them.

There is general agreement that the seat of consciousness is the brain in Human beings. We can go along with this concept. Philosopher Colin McGinn (Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University, New Jersey the USA) introduces a property of the brain of which the brain is the basis of consciousness and a theory which fully explains the dependence of conscious states on brain states. He adds that if we knew the theory, then we have a constructive solution to the mind-body problem.

It is reasonable to consider a property of the brain, but it is not possible at this stage to shut the possibility that, as Nobel Laureate Neurobiologist Sir John Eccles points out, the scope of consciousness may not remain limited within the confines of the human skull. This is especially so because many of our practical observations and those of many others clearly show that consciousness, at times, can remain completely dis-embodied. We can hence, focus our attention on understanding three factors, the nature of consciousness, the property of the brain that enables consciousness to operate within the brain, and a model that explains the behavior of the brain and consciousness as practically observed.

The brain, which is material, has received much attention over a very long period from both classical and modern scientists. The classical science explanation of the structure and the mechanisms of operation of the brain is easily accessible through medical and biology text books.


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Universe | Mysteries of No Dark Matter

Dark matter is a theorized form of matter that is believed to account for approximately 80% of the matter in the universe, and about a quarter of its total energy density. The majority of dark matter is thought to be non-baryonic in nature, possibly being composed of some as-yet undiscovered subatomic particles.[note 1] Dark matter has not been directly observed, but its presence is implied in a variety of astrophysical observations, including gravitational effects that cannot be explained unless more matter is present than can be seen. For this reason, most experts believe dark matter to be ubiquitous in the universe and to have had a strong influence on its structure and evolution. The name dark matter refers to the fact that it does not appear to interact with observable electromagnetic radiation, such as light, and is thus invisible (or 'dark') to the entire electromagnetic spectrum, making it extremely difficult to detect using usual astronomical equipment.
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Is there a dark matter Documentary National Geography 2018

Is there a dark matter Documentary National Geography 2018

Dark Universe 101 | National Geographic

Of all the great unknowns in outer space, the dark universe might just be the most mysterious. Learn the basics of dark energy and dark matter and how scientists study this nearly undetectable realm of the cosmos.
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National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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Dark Universe 101 | National Geographic


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dark matter explained in Hindi | dark energy

Secret web ep.- 12

Dark matter is a type of matter which is not visible. Dark matter made up 27 % of universe. we can't see dark matter with eyes because it does not reflect,emit or absorb light.

dark matter is different from dark energy. because of the motion of objects in a distant galaxy, scientists were able to know about it.

This video explains dark matter and dark energy completely. A full video in Hindi explaining dark matter.

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BBC 2015 Dark Matter, Dark Energy the Invisible Universe HD, Full Documentary 2016

BLACK HOLES - Full Documentary - Penetrating the Mystery of Singularities

A black hole is a place in space where gravity pulls so much that even light can not get out. The gravity is so strong because matter has been squeezed into a tiny space. This can happen when a star is dying. Because no light can get out, people can't see black holes. They are invisible. Space telescopes with special tools can help find black holes. The special tools can see how stars that are very close to black holes act differently than other stars.

How Big Are Black Holes?

Black holes can be big or small. Scientists think the smallest black holes are as small as just one atom. These black holes are very tiny but have the mass of a large mountain. Mass is the amount of matter, or stuff, in an object.

Another kind of black hole is called stellar. Its mass can be up to 20 times more than the mass of the sun. There may be many, many stellar mass black holes in Earth's galaxy. Earth's galaxy is called the Milky Way.

The largest black holes are called supermassive. These black holes have masses that are more than 1 million suns together. Scientists have found proof that every large galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its center. The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy is called Sagittarius A. It has a mass equal to about 4 million suns and would fit inside a very large ball that could hold a few million Earths.


How Do Black Holes Form?
Scientists think the smallest black holes formed when the universe began.

Stellar black holes are made when the center of a very big star falls in upon itself, or collapses. When this happens, it causes a supernova. A supernova is an exploding star that blasts part of the star into space.

Scientists think supermassive black holes were made at the same time as the galaxy they are in.


If Black Holes Are Black, How Do Scientists Know They Are There?
A black hole can not be seen because strong gravity pulls all of the light into the middle of the black hole. But scientists can see how the strong gravity affects the stars and gas around the black hole. Scientists can study stars to find out if they are flying around, or orbiting, a black hole.

When a black hole and a star are close together, high-energy light is made. This kind of light can not be seen with human eyes. Scientists use satellites and telescopes in space to see the high-energy light.


Could a Black Hole Destroy Earth?
Black holes do not go around in space eating stars, moons and planets. Earth will not fall into a black hole because no black hole is close enough to the solar system for Earth to do that.

Even if a black hole the same mass as the sun were to take the place of the sun, Earth still would not fall in. The black hole would have the same gravity as the sun. Earth and the other planets would orbit the black hole as they orbit the sun now.

The sun will never turn into a black hole. The sun is not a big enough star to make a black hole.


How Is NASA Studying Black Holes?
NASA is using satellites and telescopes that are traveling in space to learn more about black holes. These spacecraft help scientists answer questions about the universe.

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Dark matter is a hypothetical form of matterthat is thought to account for approximately 85% of the matter in the universe, and about a quarter of its total energy density. The majority of dark matter is thought to be non-baryonic in nature, possibly being composed of some as-yet undiscovered subatomic particles.Its presence is implied in a variety of astrophysical observations, including gravitational effects that cannot be explained unless more matter is present than can be seen. For this reason, most experts think dark matter to be ubiquitous in the universe and to have had a strong influence on its structure and evolution. The name dark matter refers to the fact that it does not appear to interact with observable electromagnetic radiation, such as light, and is thus invisible (or 'dark') to the entire electromagnetic spectrum, making it extremely difficult to detect using usual astronomical equipment.
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The First Moment Of Time | The Universe - Space Documentary HD

When was the first light in the universe?
The speed of light gives us an amazing tool for studying the universe. Because light only travels a mere 300,000 kilometers per second, when we see distant objects, we're looking back in time.
You're not seeing the sun as it is today, you're seeing an 8 minute old sun. You're seeing 642 year-old Betelgeuse. 2.5 million year-old Andromeda. In fact, you can keep doing this, looking further out, and deeper into time. Since the universe is expanding today, it was closer in the past.
Run the universe clock backwards, right to the beginning, and you get to a place that was hotter and denser than it is today. So dense that the entire universe shortly after the Big Bang was just a soup of protons, neutrons and electrons, with nothing holding them together.
In fact, once it expanded and cooled down a bit, the entire universe was merely as hot and as dense as the core of a star like our sun. It was cool enough for ionized atoms of hydrogen to form.
Because the universe has the conditions of the core of a star, it had the temperature and pressure to actually fuse hydrogen into helium and other heavier elements. Based on the ratio of those elements we see in the universe today: 74% hydrogen, 25% helium and 1% miscellaneous, we know how long the universe was in this whole universe is a star condition.

The fusion process generates photons of gamma radiation. In the core of our sun, these photons bounce from atom to atom, eventually making their way out of the core, through the sun's radiative zone, and eventually out into space. This process can take tens of thousands of years. But in the early universe, there was nowhere for these primordial photons of gamma radiation to go. Everywhere was more hot, dense universe.

The universe was continuing to expand, and finally, just a few hundred thousand years after the Big Bang, the universe was finally cool enough for these atoms of hydrogen and helium to attract free electrons, turning them into neutral atoms.
This was the moment of first light in the universe, between 240,000 and 300,000 years after the Big Bang, known as the Era of Recombination. The first time that photons could rest for a second, attached as electrons to atoms. It was at this point that the universe went from being totally opaque, to transparent.

And this is the earliest possible light that astronomers can see. Go ahead, say it with me: the cosmic microwave background radiation. Because the universe has been expanding over the 13.8 billion years from then until now, the those earliest photons were stretched out, or red-shifted, from ultraviolet and visible light into the microwave end of the spectrum.

If you could see the universe with microwave eyes, you'd see that first blast of radiation in all directions. The universe celebrating its existence.
After that first blast of light, everything was dark, there were no stars or galaxies, just enormous amounts of these primordial elements. At the beginning of these dark ages, the temperature of the entire universe was about 4000 kelvin. Compare that with the 2.7 kelvin we see today. By the end of the dark ages, 150 million years later, the temperature was a more reasonable 60 kelvin.

For the next 850 million years or so, these elements came together into monster stars of pure hydrogen and helium. Without heavier elements, they were free to form stars with dozens or even hundreds of times the mass of our own sun. These are the Population III stars, or the first stars, and we don't have telescopes powerful enough to see them yet. Astronomers indirectly estimate that those first stars formed about 560 million years after the Big Bang.

Then, those first stars exploded as supernovae, more massive stars formed and they detonated as well. It's seriously difficult to imagine what that time must have looked like, with stars going off like fireworks. But we know it was so common and so violent that it lit up the whole universe in an era called reionization. Most of the universe was hot plasma.
The early universe was hot and awful, and there weren't a lot of the heavier elements that life as we know it depends on. Just think about it. You can't get oxygen without fusion in a star, even multiple generations. Our own solar system is the result of several generations of supernovae that exploded, seeding our region with heavier and heavier elements.

As I mentioned earlier in the article, the universe cooled from 4000 kelvin down to 60 kelvin. About 10 million years after the Big Bang, the temperature of the universe was 100 C, the boiling point of water. And then 7 million years later, it was down to 0 C, the freezing point of water.

This has led astronomers to theorize that for about 7 million years, liquid water was present across the universe… everywhere. And wherever we find liquid water on Earth, we find life.

What is Dark Matter and Dark Energy?

What is dark energy? What is dark matter? Well, if we knew exactly we would have a nobel prize – we know that they exist though. So what do we know about those strange things?

Check out THE NOVA PROJECT to learn more about dark energy:

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