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History of the Black Death - Full Documentary

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What Made The Black Death (The Plague) so Deadly?

In modern times, if you get sick your parents take you to the doctor and you get some medicine to feel better, but in the fourteenth century illnesses like The Black Death would spread from town to town, wiping out entire villages of people. In today's educational animated video we look at what made The Black Death so deadly.
How terrible was this SICKNESS and ILLNESS? What can we learn from the history about this disease? Is the pandemic truly gone or can it one day come back? In what year did the plague doctors actually appear?

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The Black Death: Worst Pandemic in History Visualized

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Plague 101 | National Geographic

What is plague? How many people died from the Black Death and the other plague pandemics? Learn about the bacterium behind the plague disease, how factors like trade and urbanization caused it to spread to every continent except Antarctica, and how three devastating pandemics helped shape modern medicine.
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Dorsey Armstrong The Black Death The World's Most Devastating Plague Part 01 Audiobook

History Audio Books Dorsey Armstrong The Black Death The World's Most Devastating Plague Part 01
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Could the Black Death (The Plague) Happen Again?

Could the black death happen in the modern time? Why did the plague happen in the first place?

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Plague in the Ancient and Medieval World

The word 'plague', in defining a lethal epidemic, was coined by the physician Galen (l. 130-210 CE) who lived through the Antonine Plague (165 - c. 180/190 CE) but the disease was recorded long before in relating the affliction of the Plague of Athens (429-426 BCE) which killed many of the city’s inhabitants, including the statesman Pericles (l. 495-429 BCE). This epidemic, and some of the others that followed, may or may not have been actual plague as it was later defined; ancient writers tended to use the term plague for any widespread outbreak of pestilence.

Plagues certainly may have existed prior to the Athenian outbreak – and almost certainly did – but most studies of the epidemic begin with Athens as it is the first recorded by an eyewitness and survivor, the historian Thucydides (l. 460/455 - 399/398 BCE). Plagues are routinely named either for the person who reported them, the monarch at the time of the outbreak, the region afflicted, or by an epithet as in the case of the Black Death.


Original Article Plague in the Ancient & Medieval World


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What Made The Black Death So Deadly & Who Were The Plague Doctors

In modern times, if you get sick your parents take you to the doctor and you get some medicine to feel better, but in the fourteenth century illnesses like The Black Death would spread from town to town, wiping out entire villages of people. In today's educational animated video we look at what made The Black Death so deadly. Also, we are looking at 'The Plague Doctors' and who they were, what they did and how did they help.

How terrible was this SICKNESS and ILLNESS? What can we learn from the history about this disease? Is the pandemic truly gone or can it one day come back? In what year did the plague doctors actually appear? Can it come back and will it come back?


TIMESTAMPS:
00:00 What Made The Black Death (The Plague) so Deadly?
10:42 Why The Black Death (The Plague) Is The Worst Thing That Can Happen To You
19:59 Could the Black Death (The Plague) Happen Again?
25:54 The Reason Why People Passed So Young In The Middle Ages


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Medieval Misconceptions: THE BLACK DEATH, one of the worst pandemics of history

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A detailed presentation and dispelling some of the misconceptions around one of the worst pandemics of history, the medieval Bubonic Plague or the Black Death.

Here's a really great reply article to this video if you would like farther reading on the matter, and also corrects a few mistakes such as the specific time of the plague doctor mask:

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THE BLACK DEATH - A Kid Explains History, Episode 16

The Black Death, aka the Bubonic Plague, devastated Europe in the middle of the 14th century. How did it do this and where did it come from? Let Mr. Q share what he has learned.

How the Black Death Killed Rome - The Plague of Justinian DOCUMENTARY

The Plague of Justinian was one of the most destructive pandemics to rock the ancient world. It killed 10s of millions across the Empire and contributed to the fall of Rome. The first 100 people to go to are going to get unlimited access for 1 week to try it out. You’ll also get 25% off if you want the full membership.

In this history documentary we take a look at one of the most destructive pandemics of the ancient world. Thanks to modern science we have been able to identify its root cause, the Yersinia Pestis bacterium. The Black Death had come to Europe centuries before its more infamous Medieval visit.

We begin the episode with a brief discussion of disease in the ancient world. We then turn specifically to the nature of the Black Death. The documentary covers its life cycle in reservoir populations, its transmission by fleas, and its symptoms once in a host body. Once this context is established we turn to our historical record for the first record of its appearance. This occurred around 540 AD in Roman Egypt.

Our records tell us that it sprung up in the Roman fort of Pelusium on the eastern edge of the Nile Delta. Here the bacterium would infect the local rodent population which infested the grain depots and port facilities of Egypt. These then seem to have hitched a ride on one of the numerous outbound ships and been directly injected into the trade routes which were the bloodstream of the Roman Empire. The Plague then spread to all major port cities with a huge wave of destruction. The capitol of Constantinople was incredibly hard hit with even the Emperor being infected. The Plague struck the Byzantine Empire just as Belisarius was leading the legions to reconquer the west. It seems that this destabilizing attack crippled Rome's ability to press forward with the campaigns and doomed their efforts to bring about the rise of a new Roman Empire which stretched across the whole of the Mediterranean once more.

In the last portion of the documentary we then take a look at some of the scientific evidence which might better contextualize the impact of the Plague of Justinian.

Bibliography and Suggested Reading
Justinian's Flea: The First Great Plague and the End of the Roman Empire
The Justinian Plague: An inconsequential pandemic?
The Justinian Plague’s Devastating Impact Was Likely Exaggerated
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Black Death and the Failure of Pandemic Lockdowns - Pandemic History 03

Starting in 1347 and for three centuries, the second plague pandemic provides ample time to learn how to deal with the recurring outbreaks. And yet, fears of ruining the economy, political expediency, and refusal to accept reality leaves those trying to implement protection measure to fight an uphill battle. The result is even worse economic consequences, and unfathomable death.

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Hosted by: Indy Neidell and Spartacus Olsson
Written by: Indy Neidell and Spartacus Olsson
Directed by: Astrid Deinhard
Executive Producers: Astrid Deinhard, Indy Neidell, Spartacus Olsson, Bodo Rittenauer
Creative Producer: Joram Appel
Post-Production Director: Wieke Kapteijns
Research by: Spartacus Olsson, Indy Neidell, and James Currie
Edited by: Karolina Dołęga
Sound Engineer: Marek Kamiński
Graphic Design: Ryan Weatherby

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Quinto Tiberio Angelerio and New Measures for Controlling Plague in 16th-Century Alghero, Sardinia digitalized by Google, original from Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Icons from The Noun Project by: Ben Mullins, parkjisun, Muhamad Ulum & Adrien Coquet

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A Far Cry - Flouw
Fire Building Ext 3 - SFX Producer
Last Point of Safe Return - Fabien Tell
London - Howard Harper-Barnes.mp3
Please Hear Me Out - Philip Ayers
Scream Female 3 - SFX Producer.
Scream Male 6 - SFX Producer
Superior - Silver Maple
Symphony of the Cold-Blooded - Christian Andersen
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Archive by Screenocean/Reuters

Research Sources:
“Quinto Tiberio Angelerio and New Measures for Controlling Plague in 16th-Century Alghero, Sardinia” Raffaella Bianucci , Ole Jørgen Benedictow, Gino Fornaciari, and Valentina Giuffra
“The Path to Pistoia: Urban Hygiene Before the Black Death” G Geltner Past & Present, Volume 246, Issue 1, February 2020, Pages 3–33
“Encyclopedia of the Black Death” Joseph Patrick Byrne
“Epidemiological characteristics of an urban plague epidemic in Madagascar, August–November, 2017: an outbreak report” The Lancet, Rindra Randremanana, PhD *Voahangy Andrianaivoarimanana, PhD Birgit Nikolay, PhD Beza Ramasindrazana, PhD Juliette Paireau, PhD, Quirine Astrid ten Bosch, PhD et al
“Yersinia pestis, the cause of plague, is a recently emerged clone of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis” Mark Achtman, Kerstin Zurth, Giovanna Morelli, Gabriela Torrea, Annie Guiyoule, and Elisabeth Carniel
“Insights into the evolution of Yersinia pestis through whole-genome comparison with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis” P. S. G. Chain, E. Carniel, F. W. Larimer, J. Lamerdin, P. O. Stoutland, W. M. Regala, A. M. Georgescu, L. M. Vergez, M. L. Land, V. L. Motin, R. R. Brubaker, J. Fowler, J. Hinnebusch, M. Marceau, C. Medigue, M. Simonet, V. Chenal-Francisque, B. Souza, D. Dacheux, J. M. Elliott, A. Derbise, L. J. Hauser, and E. Garcia
“Distinct Clones of Yersinia pestis Caused the Black Death” Stephanie Haensch, Raffaella Bianucci, Michel Signoli, Minoarisoa Rajerison, Michael Schultz, Sacha Kacki, Marco Vermunt, Darlene A. Weston, Derek Hurst, Mark Achtman, Elisabeth Carniel, Barbara Bramanti

A TimeGhost chronological documentary produced by OnLion Entertainment GmbH.

The Black Death - The History of a Terrible Plague that has Ravaged the World - See U in History

The Black Death - The History of a Terrible Plague that has Ravaged the World



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The Return of the Black Death: The Plague of Children

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Further reading:

Histories of the Plague:





The records of the bishops of Winchester:

Critics of the bubonic plague theory:




Supporters of the bubonic plague theory:

The Bishop of Aarhus and his medical advice:

Mass Grave in Lincolnshire:

Societal effects of the plague:

The Welsh poem ‘Haint y Nodau:
Commemoration_in_Late_Medieval_Wales_DHale.pdf

The Black Death | Complete Audiobook | With Commentary | Medieval History

The Black Death is the name given to the plague outbreak in Europe between 1347-1352 CE. The term was only coined after 1800 CE in reference to the black buboes (growths) which erupted in the groin, armpit, and around the ears of those infected as the plague struck the lymph nodes; people of the time referred to it as “the pestilence” among other terms. It came from the East where it raged between 1346-1360 CE and was a combination of bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague.

One of the primary sources on the outbreak was the Italian writer and poet Giovanni Boccaccio (l. 1313-1375 CE), best known for his work The Decameron (written 1349-1353 CE), which tells the story of ten people who entertain themselves with stories while in isolation from the plague. In the first chapter, before introducing the characters, he describes how the plague struck the city of Florence in 1348 CE, how people reacted, and the staggering death toll which would finally amount to between 30-50 million before it wore itself out. The outbreak would completely alter the European social structure as well as the belief systems of many of those who survived it.

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The Original Article titled Boccaccio on the Black Death: Text & Commentary.




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The Lasting Effects of the Black Death | Pandemics & the Economy | The Great Courses Plus

How the Black Death Changed the Economy | Pandemics, epidemics, and outbreaks can have profound effects not just on human populations, but also on the economy. Discover how the Black Death shut down trade routes, lowered economic productivity, disrupted supply and demand, depressed land value, and ultimately made the medieval feudal system untenable in this lecture by Professor Donald J. Harreld from the course An Economic History of the World since 1400 that was published by The Great Courses in 2016.

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The past, present and future of the bubonic plague - Sharon N. DeWitte

View full lesson:

The bubonic plague, which killed around 1/5 of the world’s population in the 14th century, is still around today -- but it now claims only a few thousand lives each year. How did that number shrink so drastically? Sharon N. DeWitte investigates the causes and effects of the black death and explains how knowing this information can help us prepare for any future outbreaks of the disease.

Lesson by Sharon N. DeWitte, animation by Steff Lee.

The Black Death - Professor Sir Richard J. Evans FBA

Bubonic plague first swept Europe in the age of Justinian, in the sixth century, killing an estimated 25 million people in the Byzantine Empire and spreading further west. Its most devastating outbreak was in mid-fourteenth-century Europe, when it destroyed perhaps a third of the continent's population. Italian city-states pioneered the policies of quarantine and isolation that remained standard preventive measures for many centuries; religious revival and popular disturbances, crime and conflict may have spread as life was cheapened by the mass impact of the plague. The economic effects of the drastic reduction in population were severe, though not necessarily negative. Later outbreaks of the plague culminated in outbreaks in Seville (1647), London (1665), Vienna (1679) and Marseilles (1720) and then it disappeared from Europe while recurring in Asia through the nineteenth century. The plague set the template for many later confrontations with epidemic disease, discussed in the following lectures.

The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:


Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There is currently over 1,300 lectures free to access or download from the website.
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The Black Death for kids - explanating video

Plagues in Historical Perspective: The Jews and The Black Death | 07.06.2020

Plagues in Historical Perspective: The Jews and the Black Death
A four-part public lecture series in light of COVID-19, featuring the work of of the Beyond the Elite: Jewish Daily Life in Medieval Europe project of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
June 2020

Lecture I: The Plague and the Jews: An Introduction to the Black Death, held on 7.6.2020 at Beit Avichai
Prof. Elisheva Baumgarten and Dr. Eyal Levinson
This session will introduce the European fourteenth century and the situation of the Jews before and during the Black death and will discuss what we know about pre-plague life based on textual and archeological sources.

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Haunted Quarantine Island Poveglia And Venice During the Black Plague | Italy

This episode was filmed almost a year ago, 3 months after our trip to Hungary. We couldn't imagine that the Poveglia episode would air during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Venice was a city organized around maritime commerce. It took an extremely hard hit because of all the ships, people and cargo coming and going from all over the world to it’s ports.
After the first wave of the plague, three separate quarantine buildings were set up as a precautionary measure, so that the ill or the potentially ill could be moved further away from the city center. Poveglia was the first Island you would pass while trying to dock in Venice. That is why it was also used as a quarantine for boat passengers until 1814, when it was closed down. Supposedly more than 100,000 plague victims and mental patients were buried on this small island. For that reason, Poveglia is regarded as one of the most haunted locations on Earth.

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0:00 Intro
0:56 Aquileia
3:10 Venice
4:26 The Black Death
6:56 Poveglia Exploration

In ten years of exploring, we gathered extensive knowledge of many abandoned places and today we offer these services to clients:
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The idea is to travel each month to a different destination and film a travel/educational documentary on forgotten and abandoned locations. Please note that this was completely independently funded, all the gear and tools are our own.

CREDITS:
Camera 1: Mihovil Pirnat
Camera 2: Vjekoslav Palinić
Camera 3: Matija Pucak
Drone shots/logistics: Vjekoslav Palinić
Narration: Mihovil Pirnat
Editing: Mirko Czukor
Translation: Ela Diviš

Special thanks to Živko Pletikapić for additional help for filming architecture in Venice and Aquileia.

MUSIC:
A New Start - The Bows
Angst - Jan Baars
Devastation Is Here - Jon Gegelman
Glass - Claudio Laucci
Hafla Intro - Itai Armon
Looper - Michael Vignola
To The Strong - Michael Vignola

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