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How Europe Went to War in 1914. Tans Lecture Maastricht University

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How Europe Went to War in 1914. Tans Lecture Maastricht University

Christopher Clark revisits the century-old debate on the outbreak of the First World War, highlighting the complexity of a crisis that involved sudden changes in the international system. Clark proposes fresh perspectives on an old question.

Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 - Christopher Clark

This lecture explores new ways of understanding the crisis that brought war to Europe in the summer of 1914; reflects on some of the problems of interpretation that have dogged the debate over the war's origins; and considers the contemporary resonance of a catastrophe that is now nearly a century old.

The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College Website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.

Website: gresham.ac.uk
Twitter: twitter.com/GreshamCollege
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Christopher Clark, "How Europe Went to War in 1914"

Australian historian, Christopher Clark, discusses elements that led Europe to war in 1914. Presented by the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

Recorded October 1, 2014 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

How Europe Went to War in 1914: The Origins Debate Revisited

Chris Clark, Regius Professor of History, Cambridge University, presented the Annual Byrn Lecture, How Europe Went to War in 1914: The Origins Debate Revisited, on April 8, 2015 at Vanderbilt University. Bestselling author of The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914.

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Christopher Clarke - How Europe Went to War in 1914

Few episodes in the history of modern Europe have attracted such intense and lasting historical interest as the July Crisis of 1914. The chain of events that led to the outbreak of World War One still offers one of the most dramatic and intellectually enthralling narratives in modern history. Yet the size and sophistication of the existing secondary literature poses a challenge: how to generate fresh insights into a crisis that has preoccupied historians and generated controversy for nearly a century. This public lecture revisits the crisis of 1914, reflects on trends in the recent and older writing on the outbreak of war and examines some new angles of approach. Christopher Clark is Regius Professor History at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

Politics and the First World War - Professor Sir Richard Evans

The First World War put unprecedented strains on the economic, social and political systems of all the combatant nations. A year after the war ended, the Great European Empires had collapsed, and new, extremist ideologies, from fascism to communism, had emerged to disturb the postwar political world.
This lecture explores the reasons for the radical political changes that made the First World War the seminal catastrophe of twentieth-century Europe.


The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,700 lectures free to access or download from the website.
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The First World War: The Debate

As part of the British Library's contribution to the First World War Centenary, the British Library is arranging a series of events, a free exhibition, 'Enduring War: Grief, Grit and Humour', and has led the UK's contribution to a major, pan-European digitisation project.

To start the event series, we organised a debate with History Today, in which leading historians debated the origins of the war and how it should be commemorated.

The Military History of the First World War: An Overview and Analysis - Professor David Stevenson

The entire military history in just under an hour, with close examination of the changing tactics and weaponry that made this such an appalling conflict:

This lecture will analyse the reasons for the failure in 1914-15 of the initial war of movement and the factors underlying the trench stalemate that characterised the middle years of the conflict, before examining the return to more mobile campaigning in 1917-18.

It will include the war at sea as well as the war on land, and refer particularly to technology, tactics and logistics.

The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College Website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:

Pershing Lecture Series: The Ludendorff Offensives - Scott Stephenson

The Ludendorff Offensives marked the furthest advances of either the Allied or Central Powers since the beginning of the stalemated war. Join Dr. Scott Stephenson as we continue the John J. Pershing Great War Centennial Series with a presentation on the context, effects and legacy of the Ludendorff Offensives.

The John J. Pershing Lecture Series is presented in partnership with the Command and General Staff College Foundation and in conjunction with the centennial exhibition Crucible Life and Death in 1918.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Pershing Lecture Series: The German Army and the Kaiser's Abdication - Scott Stephenson

Facing defeat and revolution at home, the German Kaiser faced an impossible decision in 1918. Join Dr. Scott Stephenson in examining the Kaiser’s choices: seeking a hero's battlefield death at the front, crushing the domestic revolution or fleeing to a neutral nation. The lecture is part of the John J. Pershing Great War Centennial Series presented in partnership with the Command and General Staff College Foundation

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
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CIRSD Conference on WWI: Panel "What Kind of Failure?" - Prof. Christopher Clark

Topic of discussion of the panel: Was the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 a failure of diplomacy, or a failure of foresight on the part of political and military elites, who went to war open-eyed but miscalculated consequences?

Christopher Clark is a Professor of Modern European History at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St Catharine's College, as well as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities. He is the author of various books on modern German and European history, including the one on the history of Prussia entitled Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia 1600-1947 (2006). His latest book is a study of the outbreak of the First World War entitled The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 (2012). Clark is a co-editor of the scholarly book series New Studies in European History published by Cambridge University Press. In October 2010, Germany awarded Clark the Officer's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany, for his research which had contributed greatly to German-British relations

Dr. Mark DePue Discusses Trench Warfare During WWI

The Western Front during World War I was defined by two unbroken lines of trenches and a deadly no-man's land in between, dominated by machine guns and artillery. Dr. Mark DePue will examine the inability of the generals on both side to break out of the trenches. This is the second in the series of presentations discussing World War I.
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New Thinking on the Origins of World War I

This summer marks the centennial of the outbreak of World War I, perhaps the most transformative war in history. While the wars of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic wars harnessed national populations to the war effort in a way not previously seen since the emergence of the modern states system, WWI combined the mobilization of both populations and industrial power, enhanced by technology, to produce a most lethal form of warfare. WWI also redrew the map of Europe and created the modern Middle East, as it led to the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Russian Empire, and the Ottoman Empire, thereby unleashing nationalism the disruptive characteristics of which still plague us today. It also paved the way for the great ideological conflicts of the 20th century by unleashing the forces of state-based communism and fascism. To commemorate the outbreak of The Great War, FPRI and ROA will present a workshop offering presentations by three eminent scholars of the war. Michael Neiberg of the US Army War College will discuss the factors that led to the outbreak of the war. John Schindler of the US Naval War College will discuss the often overlooked role of Austria-Hungary in the war and the Eastern and Italian fronts. Kate Epstein of Rutgers University-Camden will discuss the role of pre-war British defense policy in the outbreak of the conflict. Mac Owens, editor of Orbis and professor at the Naval War College, will moderate the panel.

"Catastrophe 1914: Europe goes to War," Sir Max Hastings, The University of Kansas

Sir Max Hastings is a celebrated journalist, broadcaster, and author of twelve books on military history, including Bomber Command (1979), Overlord: D-Day and the Battle for Normandy (1984), and Inferno: The World at War, 1939-45 (2011). He now writes regularly for the Daily Mail and Financial Times, of which he is a contributing editor and reviews books for the Sunday Times and New York Review of Books.

Hastings’ new book, Catastrophe 1914, recreates this dramatic year of the first World War, from the diplomatic crisis to the fighting in Belgium and France on the western front, and Serbia and Galicia to the east. He gives vivid accounts of the battles and frank assessments of generals and political leaders, and shows why it was inevitable that the first war among modern industrial nations could not produce a decisive victory, resulting in a war of attrition.

DePue Origins of WWI

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The War of 1914: An Avoidable Catastrophe, Dr. Sean McMeekin

Sean McMeekin is Professor of History at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y.

Rejecting earlier accounts of the outbreak of World War I, which emphasized structural factors or German ‘premeditation,’ McMeekin proposes instead a series of contingent occurrences stretching from the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo on June 28 to the British ultimatum to Berlin on Aug. 4, 1914. Far from fated by the alliance system or the arms race, the war of 1914 was an eminently avoidable catastrophe brought on by the opportunistic scheming by a small handful of statesmen, often driven as much by personal complexes and rivalries as by compelling reasons of state. Though
aware, in some sense, of the risks they were running, none of the men responsible could have imagined the scale of the human catastrophe they were about to unleash.

Presented November 7, 2014 as part of the National World War I Museum and United States World War I Centennial Commission 2014 Symposium, 1914: Global War & American Neutrality.

The Symposium was held in association with The Western Front Association East Coast Branch and the World War I Historical Association. Sponsored by Colonel J's, the Neighborhood Tourist Development Fund and Verlag Militaria.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

The Great WWI Controversy: Who Was to Blame? A Panel Discussion on the Centennial

The origins of the First World War have aroused deep controversy for decades. On the centennial of the war, there is renewed interest in revisiting its origins. Was Germany to blame? Did Europe’s statesmen sleepwalk to war? In this panel discussion, leading historians and IR experts will weigh in on the debate and offer lessons for avoiding another great power conflict.

Graham Allison: Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Peter Gourevitch: Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego
Charles S. Maier: Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History, Harvard University
Thomas Weber: Professor of History and International Affairs, University of Aberdeen; Visiting Scholar, CES
Chaired by: Alison Frank Johnson: Professor of History, Harvard University

Monday, Nov 24th, 2014

Britain and 1914 - Professor Vernon Bogdanor

Professor Vernon Bogdanor unpicks the political and social ties that brought led to the first world war:

'Nations slithered over the brink into the boiling cauldron of war without any trace of apprehension or dismay', (Lloyd George, 1934). Britain has been blamed for not making the position clear following the murder of the Austrian Archduke at Sarajevo, and also for aligning with France and Russia, thus promoting the division of Europe into two camps. The government was accused of failing to avert the conflict and then involving Britain in an unnecessary war. Criticisms will be analysed to consider whether they are justified in the light of modern historical research.

The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College Website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:

The 2017 Michael King Memorial Lecture: War in the Nazi imagination

The Department of History and Art History at the University of Otago is proud to present the 2017 Michael King Memorial Lecture, delivered by Professor Sir Richard J. Evans, Regius Professor Emeritus of History, University of Cambridge.

How did the Nazis conceive of war? In this lecture, Professor Evans—a world authority on Nazi Germany—argues that Hitler's belief that war was necessary for the fitness and survival of the German race led him to promote the indoctrination of German society at every level with a will to wage war and the preparedness to do so. Perpetual conflict was the aim, and the idea that World War II would have ended had the Nazis won is an illusion; it would have been followed by other conflicts, principally with America. In this way, defeat was built in to the Nazi war effort from the beginning.
12 October 2017

The Ending of World War I: The Road to 11 November

This lecture re-examines how the First World War ended. Why did Germany request a ceasefire and why did the Allies and America grant one?

A lecture by David Stevenson, Professor of International History at LSE 7 November 2018



This lecture will re-examine how the First World War ended, anticipating the centenary commemorations in 2018. It will discuss both why Germany requested a ceasefire, and why the Allies and America granted one. It will argue that the German army was near collapse, and that Germany was not defeated by a 'stab in the back' at home. None the less, the Allies had good reasons not to press on to Berlin.

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