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How Europe Went to War in 1914. Tans Lecture Maastricht University

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How Europe Went to War in 1914. Tans Lecture Maastricht University

Christopher Clark revisits the century-old debate on the outbreak of the First World War, highlighting the complexity of a crisis that involved sudden changes in the international system. Clark proposes fresh perspectives on an old question.
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Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 - Christopher Clark

This lecture explores new ways of understanding the crisis that brought war to Europe in the summer of 1914; reflects on some of the problems of interpretation that have dogged the debate over the war's origins; and considers the contemporary resonance of a catastrophe that is now nearly a century old.

The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College Website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.

Website: gresham.ac.uk
Twitter: twitter.com/GreshamCollege
Facebook: facebook.com/greshamcollege
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Catastrophe 1914: Europe goes to War, Sir Max Hastings, The University of Kansas

Sir Max Hastings is a celebrated journalist, broadcaster, and author of twelve books on military history, including Bomber Command (1979), Overlord: D-Day and the Battle for Normandy (1984), and Inferno: The World at War, 1939-45 (2011). He now writes regularly for the Daily Mail and Financial Times, of which he is a contributing editor and reviews books for the Sunday Times and New York Review of Books.

Hastings’ new book, Catastrophe 1914, recreates this dramatic year of the first World War, from the diplomatic crisis to the fighting in Belgium and France on the western front, and Serbia and Galicia to the east. He gives vivid accounts of the battles and frank assessments of generals and political leaders, and shows why it was inevitable that the first war among modern industrial nations could not produce a decisive victory, resulting in a war of attrition.
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13. The Origins of World War I

France Since 1871 (HIST 276)

The traditional, diplomatic history of World War I is helpful in understanding how a series of hitherto improbable alliances come to be formed in the early years of the twentieth century. In the case of France and Russia, this involves a significant ideological compromise. Along with the history of imperial machinations, however, World War I should be understood in the context of the popular imagination and the growth of nationalist sentiment in Europe.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Tangled Maps of Empire: Diplomatic Origins of the First World War
07:24 - Chapter 2. A Delicate Balances: The Shifting Alliances of the Great Powers
19:26 - Chapter 3. The British Empire on the World Stage: Capabilities on the Continent
32:29 - Chapter 4. Mounting Tensions in Alsace-Lorraine: The Saverne Crisis
40:14 - Chapter 5. War Expectations and Enthusiasm

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.
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Christopher Clarke - How Europe Went to War in 1914

Few episodes in the history of modern Europe have attracted such intense and lasting historical interest as the July Crisis of 1914. The chain of events that led to the outbreak of World War One still offers one of the most dramatic and intellectually enthralling narratives in modern history. Yet the size and sophistication of the existing secondary literature poses a challenge: how to generate fresh insights into a crisis that has preoccupied historians and generated controversy for nearly a century. This public lecture revisits the crisis of 1914, reflects on trends in the recent and older writing on the outbreak of war and examines some new angles of approach. Christopher Clark is Regius Professor History at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

16. The Coming of the Great War

European Civilization, 1648-1945 (HIST 202)

If the early years of the twentieth century were marked by a general consensus that a major war was impending, no similar consensus existed concerning the likely form that war would take. Not only the carnage of World War I, but also the nature of its alliances would have been difficult to imagine. Indeed, in 1900 many people would have predicted conflict, rather than collaboration, between France and Britain. The reasons for the eventual entente between France and Britain and France and Russia consist principally in economic and geopolitical motivations. Cultural identity also played a role, particularly in relations between France and Germany. The territory of Alsace-Lorraine formed a crucible for the questions of nationalism and imaginary identity that would be contested in the Great War.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Origins of the First World War: The Tangled Web of Alliances and Rivalries
22:27 - Chapter 2. Britain's Loyalties: Involvement in the Continental Competition
29:27 - Chapter 3. The Formation of the Triple Entente
35:56 - Chapter 4. The Saverne Incident
43:08 - Chapter 5. The Schlieffen Plan: The Timetable of Mobilization

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2008.

The Ending of World War I: The Road to 11 November

This lecture re-examines how the First World War ended. Why did Germany request a ceasefire and why did the Allies and America grant one?

A lecture by David Stevenson, Professor of International History at LSE 7 November 2018



This lecture will re-examine how the First World War ended, anticipating the centenary commemorations in 2018. It will discuss both why Germany requested a ceasefire, and why the Allies and America granted one. It will argue that the German army was near collapse, and that Germany was not defeated by a 'stab in the back' at home. None the less, the Allies had good reasons not to press on to Berlin.

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New Thinking on the Origins of World War I

This summer marks the centennial of the outbreak of World War I, perhaps the most transformative war in history. While the wars of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic wars harnessed national populations to the war effort in a way not previously seen since the emergence of the modern states system, WWI combined the mobilization of both populations and industrial power, enhanced by technology, to produce a most lethal form of warfare. WWI also redrew the map of Europe and created the modern Middle East, as it led to the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Russian Empire, and the Ottoman Empire, thereby unleashing nationalism the disruptive characteristics of which still plague us today. It also paved the way for the great ideological conflicts of the 20th century by unleashing the forces of state-based communism and fascism. To commemorate the outbreak of The Great War, FPRI and ROA will present a workshop offering presentations by three eminent scholars of the war. Michael Neiberg of the US Army War College will discuss the factors that led to the outbreak of the war. John Schindler of the US Naval War College will discuss the often overlooked role of Austria-Hungary in the war and the Eastern and Italian fronts. Kate Epstein of Rutgers University-Camden will discuss the role of pre-war British defense policy in the outbreak of the conflict. Mac Owens, editor of Orbis and professor at the Naval War College, will moderate the panel.

The Military History of the First World War: An Overview and Analysis - Professor David Stevenson

The entire military history in just under an hour, with close examination of the changing tactics and weaponry that made this such an appalling conflict:

This lecture will analyse the reasons for the failure in 1914-15 of the initial war of movement and the factors underlying the trench stalemate that characterised the middle years of the conflict, before examining the return to more mobile campaigning in 1917-18.

It will include the war at sea as well as the war on land, and refer particularly to technology, tactics and logistics.

The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College Website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:

Christopher Clark, France and the Origins of the Great War

H-France Salon, Volume 6, Issue 13
Society for French Historical Studies
Plenary Session
26 April 2014
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16. The Great War, Grief, and Memory (Guest Lecture by Bruno Cabanes)

France Since 1871 (HIST 276)

The human cost of World War I cannot be understood only in terms of demographics. To better understand the consequences of the war upon both soldiers and civilians it is necessary to consider mourning in its private, as well as its public dimensions. Indeed, for many French people who lived through the war, public spectacles of bereavement, such as the Unknown Soldier, were also conceived of as intensely private affairs. Both types of mourning are associated with a wide variety of rituals and procedures.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Personal and Communal Mourning: Modes of Cultural Grief During and After the Great War
05:39 - Chapter 2. Communities in Mourning: Social Circles of Grief
15:57 - Chapter 3. Specificities of the Great War Experience: The Lost Generation, the Lost Bodies
27:53 - Chapter 4. Rites of Collective Mourning: Creating National Unity through Commemoration

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 | Book Review

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Sources:

Clark, Christopher. The Sleepwalkers: How Europe went to war in 1914. (London: Allen Lane, 2012).

The Great WWI Controversy: Who Was to Blame? A Panel Discussion on the Centennial

The origins of the First World War have aroused deep controversy for decades. On the centennial of the war, there is renewed interest in revisiting its origins. Was Germany to blame? Did Europe’s statesmen sleepwalk to war? In this panel discussion, leading historians and IR experts will weigh in on the debate and offer lessons for avoiding another great power conflict.

Graham Allison: Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Peter Gourevitch: Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego
Charles S. Maier: Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History, Harvard University
Thomas Weber: Professor of History and International Affairs, University of Aberdeen; Visiting Scholar, CES
Chaired by: Alison Frank Johnson: Professor of History, Harvard University

Monday, Nov 24th, 2014

Europe: Then and Now, featuring Professor Christopher Clark

Please join us for a fascinating conversation with Christopher Clark, Professor of Modern European History at Cambridge University and author of The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 as we discuss the most significant events that led to the outbreak of World War I during this year's centenary commemoration and reflect on the contemporary similarities. Once again, Europe is witnessing resurgent nationalism that has led to the rise of extremist groups seeking to undermine the status quo. Russia, too, is once more emboldened by the perceived imperative to defend its ethnic and religious kin abroad. And the U.S., exhausted after decades of involvement overseas, has adopted a foreign policy increasingly reminiscent of pre-Wilsonian isolationism. Professor Clark will examine the historic parallels between Europe then and now, and share his thoughts on why Europe went to war in 1914.
Europe, Then and Now:
Parallels between 1914 and 2014 Considered

featuring

Professor Christopher Clark
Author of The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914
Professor of Modern European History, Cambridge University

moderated by

Ms. Heather Conley
Director and Senior Fellow, CSIS Europe Program

Margaret MacMillan: The Road to 1914

International historian Margaret MacMillan returns to The Agenda to discuss the events that led to the First World War, as chronicled in her book The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914. MacMillan tells Steve Paikin why Europe's major powers made decisions that resulted in The Great War.
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The Evolution of Warfare to 1914 - Nicholas Murray

Dr. Nicholas Murray, historian and author of The Rocky Road to the Great War: The Evolution of Trench Warfare to 1914, discusses the evolution of defensive and offensive tactics and armaments in the lead up to the Great War, including the experience of armies in wars during the decades leading up to World War I and how this experience shaped tactical thinking at the start of the war.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Dr. Mark DePue Discusses Trench Warfare During WWI

The Western Front during World War I was defined by two unbroken lines of trenches and a deadly no-man's land in between, dominated by machine guns and artillery. Dr. Mark DePue will examine the inability of the generals on both side to break out of the trenches. This is the second in the series of presentations discussing World War I.

From Wars Toward the Great War: The Ottomans and the Vortex of WWI - Michael Reynolds

Dr. Michael Reynolds, historian and author of Shattering Empires: The Clash and Collapse of the Ottoman and Russian Empires, 1908-1918, explores the Ottoman Empire's losing struggle to preserve its existence from 1876 to 1914 to explain why the Ottomans made the decision to enter the Great War on the side of the Central Powers in 1914.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Britain and 1914 - Professor Vernon Bogdanor

Professor Vernon Bogdanor unpicks the political and social ties that brought led to the first world war:

'Nations slithered over the brink into the boiling cauldron of war without any trace of apprehension or dismay', (Lloyd George, 1934). Britain has been blamed for not making the position clear following the murder of the Austrian Archduke at Sarajevo, and also for aligning with France and Russia, thus promoting the division of Europe into two camps. The government was accused of failing to avert the conflict and then involving Britain in an unnecessary war. Criticisms will be analysed to consider whether they are justified in the light of modern historical research.

The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College Website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:

Christopher Clark on German guilt for WW1

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Christopher Clark - How Europe Went to War in 1914. Tans Lecture Maastricht University
YouTube channel: Maastricht University
Published on Nov 18, 2014
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