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How Is Japan Dealing With Its Rapidly Ageing Population?

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How Is Japan Dealing With Its Rapidly Ageing Population?

Age Bomb (2013): More than a quarter of Japanese people are over 65 and the number is rising. Soon more than 100 other nations will face a similar problem. Can they learn from the Japanese approach to their ageing demographic?

For similar stories, see:
Is Japan's Criminal Justice System Very Efficient or Deeply Flawed?

Inside ​Japan's Controversial Military Expansion

Where have All the Children Gone? - 45min. documentary


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It's estimated that by 2015 there will be 2.5 million Japanese with senile dementia and as Japan becomes an increasingly urban population, its cities are struggling to cope. In Tokyo a scheme to keep the elderly active with part time jobs is proving a hit. I have no experience of working in a nursery, but this work is pleasant and useful, says 77-year-old Rie. If most people work until 75 and pay tax, we can support them and it makes people healthier, argues Professor Akiyama, who runs the scheme.

Medianolaget Linslusen HB – Ref. 5980

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Japan's Demographic Time Bomb | Insight | Full Episode

Japan tackles traditional values to deal with a labour shortage, sparked by rapidly decreasing birth rates and an ageing society.

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The Japanese React To The Aging Population | ASIAN BOSS

Special Thanks to our Asian Boss reporter Chiaki.

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Immigrants could be the answer to Japan’s population crisis

Japan's government recently passed a law that will give work visas to hundreds of thousands of low-skilled foreign workers as it tries to replenish a rapidly shrinking workforce. The country, which has historically seen itself as culturally and ethnically homogenous, has a deeply ambivalent attitude toward immigration, and the new law is drawing its fair share of controversy. Opponents say it's too vague. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe insists the workers who enter Japan under the new law will be there only temporarily, sparking concerns it risks making immigrant workers second class citizens. Regardless,  it is a major immigration overhaul in all but name, say observers.

Japanese government’s campaign to make fatherhood sexy
For more on how Japan is dealing with its population crisis::

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How can Japan solve its population problem?

In Japan, authorities are experimenting with different ways to address the country’s declining population.

In the south of Japan, people are receiving incentives to remain in the town where they live - and some couples are being paid to have children.

And now the government is researching how robots could alleviate staff shortages.

China's ageing population

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More than three decades after China introduced policies aimed at controlling its population, the country is having to cope with increasing demographic imbalances.

One effect is the growing ratio of older to younger people, in turn placing huge pressures on single children to care for their aging parents and grandparents.

Al Jazeera's Melissa Chan reports from Beijing.

At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.'
Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained.
Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on.
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Are the Japanese Risking Extinction?

Japan's Baby Drain: With a plummeting birth rate and a rapidly ageing population, Japan is facing an unprecedented population collapse with vast economic, social and political implications. We explore the dangers facing the nation.

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The Ainu's Tense Relationship with Japan

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In bustling Tokyo, there's little sense of an impending crisis, but Japan is facing a demographic time bomb. Nobody is having babies. The men aren't as hungry for success or for relationships as they were before, says Kaoru Arai. She epitomises the country's new breed of successful and financially independent women that are putting their career first. I'm picky, yes. I want it all, she smiles. In a desperate move to pull the birth rate back from the brink, the government is offering cash incentives to encourage singles to partner up and procreate.

Meanwhile, the elderly are being left behind, with no one to look after them. Japan's seemingly xenophobic reluctance to admit foreign workers means that major companies are now racing to develop robots to help fill the void and support its ageing population. Somewhat desperate measures, which reveal how difficult the problem has become for the government to handle. This situation cannot continue, we know this very well, but it is still not something that is easily solved.

SBS Australia – Ref. 5785

Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.

Japan Baby Boom: City's policies turn around population decline

Japan is facing a growing demographic crisis. Its population is shrinking, and ageing so rapidly that one in five people are now 70 or older. The economy is slowing down as the number of pensioners rise and the working-age population falls, which means there are also fewer taxpayers. Mayu Yoshida reports went to a city in the east that's bucking the population trend.

#Japan #PopulationDecline #JapanDemographics


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Hong Kong Connection:Ageing In Place

People are living longer and longer. While longevity is something to be celebrated, an ageing population is a considerable problem for any modern city or country. In Hong Kong, a policy referred to as Ageing In Place was introduced in 2003.

Japan's ageing population

In Japan, the proportion of older people aged 65 years old and older is already more than one-quarter of the country's total population. This is the largest proportion of older people in the world. President of the Promotion and Mutual Aid Corporation for Private Schools of Japan, Prof. Atsushi Seike, talks about the ageing population of Japan.
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How will China handle its rapidly ageing population?

Phillip Yin joins Karen Eggleston, Director of Stanford University's Asia Health Policy Program, to talk about the difference between China and Western caring systems for the elderly and the challenges that China faces.

Japan Is Rapidly Becoming An Aged Society (2001)

Geriatric Island (2001): Japanese people are living longer and having fewer children - and soon that will mean there will be more people retired than working, and that has profound economic consequences.

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In Okikamuro, one of the 'the Islands of the Aged', the average age is 71. Catch a cab and chances are your taxi driver will be 85. Get a haircut from an 84 year old. Watch the children play - except they're life-size mannequins placed there to cheer the place up. With the longest life expectancy and one of the world's lowest birth rates, Japan is in for a massive demographic change. In 6 years the population will start to shrink. By the end of the century forecasts say it will have halved. Never has a country aged so quickly, as Japan's will do so in the next 10-15 years. Japanese businessmen are forecast to soon be paying up to 75% of their income; in tax, insurance and pensions; and this is already being partly blamed for crippling the Japanese economy.

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ABC Australia– Ref. 1043

Work until you're 100 - Japan's Incredible Life Expectancy (2010)

An Age Old Problem (2010): At the time of year when our concern for the elderly is particularly strong, we travel to Japan, the world's oldest nation, to discover the secret to dealing with advancing age. But have they got the answers?

For similar stories, see:
How Is Japan Dealing With Its Rapidly Ageing Population?

What Are The Secrets To A Long Life?

Could the Future of Elderly Care be in the Hands of These Robots?


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With 30 million people over 65, Japan's life expectancy is the highest in the world. In the countryside it seems that keeping active and sociable is the secret; a positive mental attitude is what counts. Yet in Tokyo the story is not quite the same - in the city the elderly aren't active through choice. Meagre pensions mean they often work up to their deaths. More and more old people line the streets, living one day to the next. With a huge burden falling on the younger generation, the technophile Japanese see robots as a solution, most recently developing a 'robot suit' walking aid, designed to increase independence. It's a step in the right direction, but is it too little too late?

ORF – Ref. 5019

Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.

Japan embraces robotics to tackle ageing population problem

Innovation in robotics technology helps Japan's rapidly ageing population by providing solutions for domestic help and childcare. TRT World's Joel Flynn reports.

A grim prospect: the aging population in Japan means more people are dying alone

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Japan''s aging population has meant that more and more people end up dying alone. Experts say there are about 30 000 cases a year. It is a bi-product of cultural and economic change in Japan. More than 10 million Japanese now live alone. Families are still the main care givers for the elderly but its still a struggle.

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Japan's Aging Population...Everyday Effects

Things you never think about!

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The Ageing Population - A Different Lens

It’s a fact of life, every single one of us gets older.
Life expectancies are rising whilst birth-rates are on the decline, are we equipped to deal with the consequences? In this episode of A Different Lens we explore the implications of ageing.
From improving our quality of life and understanding the economic repercussions of getting older, to exploring the changes within family structures and workforce we seek to determine;
Can society adapt to an ageing population?
A Different Lens


Produced by Monash University

Monash Business School
Dr Carly Moulang

Monash Education
Dr Geraldine Burke

Monash Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
Professor Joseph Ibrahim
Professor Claire Johnson
Dr Alana Hewitt

Monash University Malaysia
Professor Mahendhiran Sanggaran Nair
Chief Executive Officer, Monash Malaysia R&D

Associate Professor Teh Pei Lee
Monash School of Business, Malaysia

Dr Deepa Alex
Jefferey Cheah
Monash School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Malaysia

Music by Dg Music
Animation by Jumbla
Audio Post Production Baxter Sound
Directed by Hayden Gregory

Produced by Monash University In Partnership With VMLY&R ANZ

Truth of the Aging Time Bomb | Chana Mahadumrongkul | TEDxBangkokPatanaSchool

People age every day. However, as populations around the world continue to grow and healthcare becomes even more progressive, people are also living longer than ever before. By 2050, the number of people in the world 65 and older will have doubled from 10% to 20% – even more surprising is that 70% of the world’s population is expected to be locating in urban areas. For one thing, we have an aging population that is going to need food, money, housing, healthcare – the list goes on. For another thing, an aging population puts a psychological strain on the society as people grow frail and lose mental acuity as they age. How can we, as the younger generation, approach this problem collectively but effectively to best support our baby boom cohorts?

I am a 17-year-old girl who is advocating for people doubled my age or older. In my talk, I will explore “The Truth of Aging Time Bomb,” one of the biggest challenge that the world is facing. Having visited and researched a numerous number of nursing homes all over Thailand, this is now a chance for me to speak about the problem that I genuinely care.
People age every day. However, as populations around the world continue to grow and healthcare becomes even more progressive, people are also living longer. By 2050, the number of people in the world 65 and older will have doubled from 10% to 20%. For one thing, we have an aging population that is going to need food, money, housing, healthcare -- the list goes on. For another thing, an aging population puts a psychological strain on the society as people grow frail and lose mental acuity as they age. How can we, as the younger generation, approach this problem collectively but effectively to best support our baby boom cohorts?

I am a 17-year-old girl who is advocating for people doubled my age or older. In my talk, I will explore “The Truth of Aging Time Bomb,” one of the biggest challenges we are facing. Having visited and researched a numerous number of nursing homes all over Thailand, this is now a chance for me to speak about the problem that I genuinely care. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

101 East Ageing Japan: The Burden of a Graying Planet

Japan faces a demographic crisis. Its population is falling rapidly due to an ageing population and declining birthrates. In two decades from now, seniors will outnumber children under 15.

Japan's government believes it has found a cure for its faltering economy: Women. Long overlooked during more than two decades of economic stagnation, Japanese women are considered among.

In a country that frowns upon foster care, 33000 children from abusive homes are growing up in state institutions. More from 101 East on: YouTube - Facebook.

Population Aging and Economic Growth: Impact and Policy Implications

● Author
- Jaejoon Lee, Fellow

● Go to related report
- KDI Policy Forum, Population Aging and Economic Growth:
Impact and Policy Implications.(

● KDI Website
-

In an aging society there are 7 seniors out of every one hundred people, while an aged society has 14 and a super-aged society has 20.

Korea is expected to enter a super-aged society in 2026.

In fact, at the current pace of aging, Korea is on track to become a super-aged society 10 years faster than Japan.

In terms of the working-age population, Korea’s 65-plus population will grow 1.7 times faster than Japan from 2015 to 2050.

And the share of the senior population will equal that of the working population in 2050.

So, what are the economic repercussions of a rapidly aging population?

KDI conducted an analysis based on the labor force participation rate by age group in 2017, assuming 3 scenarios to estimate the economic growth rate for the coming three decades.

Firstly, assuming that the labor force participation rate remains unchanged during the period, the economic growth rate will average 2.0% in the 2020s and 1.0% in the 2040s.

Next, taking into account Korea’s lower employment rate for women than for men, estimates were made for the growth in the participation rate of women.

For this, Sweden’s employment structure, which has a small gap between men and women, was applied.

However, the results showed that the economic growth rate declined.

Growth trends again failed to improve when the employment structure of Japan, who underwent population aging before Korea, was applied.

The reason for the lack of improvement is because the number of retirees far outnumbers that of the working population.

As a result, even a high participation rate is inadequate to offset the decline in the labor supply.

Accordingly, unless significant improvements are made in productivity through measures to expand the substitute labor force, which includes women and young people, efforts to counter population aging will remain limited.

Additionally, the results revealed that in order to ease the downtrend in economic growth, the labor participation rate of women must be at a similar level to Sweden and that of men to Japan’s while the senior participation rate is at Korea’s level.

The involvement of the senior population in economic activities will not only ease the decline in economic growth but also reduce the dependency ratio, serving as an effective countermeasure to population aging.

[Interview with the author]
The most effective means in terms of responding to population aging is utilizing the senior labor force. And, there are many prerequisites for this, including overhauling the retirement age system and adjusting the wage system.

In addition, we must move away from the social norms of perceiving the over 65s as dependents or surplus. A new life cycle must be established for the senior generation, and the population should be granted opportunities and roles to productively contribute to society.

It is true that compared to the quantity, the quality of Korea’s senior labor market remains subpar.

However, the baby boomers who will soon retire are far more educated than the preceding senior generation. As such, their employment and their productivity in the senior labor market is also expected to increase. In particular, policy efforts must be ramped up in terms of providing vocational training and lifelong education programs to assist those looking to change careers later in life.

#AgingSociety #EconomicGrowth #Economy #WorkingagePopulation #forceparticipationrate #Laborsupply #KDI #KoreaDevelopmentInstitute

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