This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

How likely are coronavirus transmissions during flights? | COVID-19 Special

x

How likely are coronavirus transmissions during flights? | COVID-19 Special

During the coronavirus lockdowns, air traffic was largely grounded. Now it is gradually starting up again, but there's a long way to go - also in terms of safety measures.
Subscribe:

For more news go to:
Follow DW on social media:
►Facebook:
►Twitter:
►Instagram:
Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie:
#Coronavirus #Flights #Covid19
x

How To Travel and NOT Get Coronavirus - 7 Tips for Flying and Driving in this COVID-19 Pandemic ✈????

How To Travel and NOT Get Coronavirus - 7 Tips for Flying and Driving in this COVID-19 Pandemic ✈????

Catching Coronavirus / COVID-19 in an airplane is possible by inhaling the virus. And the regular face covering that you wear, such as a regular medical mask, won’t prevent you from inhaling the virus if it’s in the air close to you.

Airborne Transmission
-

Coronavirus | COVID-19 YouTube Video Playlist:


Here are my recommended items:

Regular Medical/Surgical Mask


Elastomeric Respirator Mask to Prevent Inhaling The Virus


Glasses/Goggles to Protect Your Eyes


Air Purifier for Home/Office


Pulse Oximeter to measure your Oxygen at Home


Most airlines are requiring passengers to wear masks. Some airlines are also taking other measures to minimize person to person interaction, such as not serving alcoholic beverages or are skipping snacks altogether. Most commercial flights these days have very clean cabin air. Airplanes accomplish this by the way they have their air intake system setup. Essentially, they have compressed air passing through the jet engines, with its temperature being super hot. That hot air is then cooled, and put under pressure (450) PSI. So between the initial hot temperatures and the high pressure, that makes the air in the cabin very sterile, as bacteria and viruses become destroyed in that process.

And the cabin air is exchanged every 3-4 minutes, which is actually better than offices and homes, which is typically every 5-12 minutes. Also, with newer generations of airplanes, they have high-efficiency particulate air filters, meaning HEPA filters, that filter the recirculated air. They can fish out particles as small as 0.3 microns, which is what an N95 respirator mask can do, as well as an elastomeric mask. Now some might say, well the virus is only about 0.1 microns in diameter or 100 nm…. And this is true. But most of the virus in the air is going to exist within respiratory droplets. So the bottom line is, if the virus is in the air, most of it, about 95% of it, will be filtered out with these HEPA filters on the plane, and the same goes for respirator masks.

When someone is expelling respiratory droplets, the ones that more than 5-10 microns in size, those are the ones that are going to act like ballistics, and fall within 6-12 feet of them, IF… they are NOT wearing a mask. The respiratory droplets that are expelled are less than 5 microns, these are the ones that will stay suspended in the air. If someone is wearing a mask, it will drastically reduce the distance the size of that moist cloud, and the distance that moist cloud can travel, but it won’t be totally prevented.

So if no one sitting close to you, or if someone is sitting close to you but does not have the virus, no worries. But, of course, people are going to be close to you, and it's impossible to know who has the virus. And if that virus is in the air close to you, you’re going to breathe it in, unless….you do tip #1, which is, you wear an N95 respirator mask, or an elastomeric respirator. Both of these filter out at least 95% of airborne particles as small as 0.3 microns. Right now the CDC recommends the public to not purchase and wear these N95 respirator masks, for one because they need to be reserved for health care workers. I don’t understand how they can be in limited supply this deep into a pandemic, but I digress. But what you can do is get yourself an elastomeric respirator. This is a reusable device with exchangeable cartridge filters. Like an N95 respirator, it also filters out at least 95% of airborne particles as small as 0.3 microns. It fits tight against the user's face but is more comfortable than an N95.

Dr. Mike Hansen, MD
Internal Medicine | Pulmonary Disease | Critical Care Medicine
Website:
Instagram Account:

#coronavirus #covid19
x

How can you reduce risk of getting COVID-19 on an airplane?

An infectious disease specialist and a respirologist answer viewer questions about the coronavirus pandemic including how to reduce the risk of getting COVID-19 on an airplane.

Watch The National live on YouTube Sunday-Friday at 9 p.m. ET

Subscribe to The National:


Connect with The National online:
Facebook |
Twitter |
Instagram |

More from CBC News |

The National is CBC's flagship nightly news program, featuring the day's top stories with in-depth and original journalism, with hosts Adrienne Arsenault and Andrew Chang in Toronto, Ian Hanomansing in Vancouver and the CBC's chief political correspondent, Rosemary Barton in Ottawa.
x

How Contagious is COVID-19? (Transmission, Spread, and R0)

Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 occurs via droplet transmission, contact transmission, and aerosol transmission. Droplet transmission occurs when respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes are inhaled by a person nearby. Contact transmission occurs when a person touches a contaminated surface and then their mouth, nose, or eyes. Aerosol transmission occurs when respiratory droplets containing the virus mix into the air and then are inhaled. COVID-19 is stable for up to 24 hours on cardboard, 2-3 days on plastic and stainless steel and up to three hours in aerosols, which include fog, mist, dust, air pollutants, and smoke. Therefore, it is possible to get infected by touching contaminated objects or through the air.
The incubation period is the time between infection and symptom onset for an illness. Estimates for COVID-19’s incubation period vary from 2-14 days, but it is generally assumed to be around 5 days. There is more debate about the latent period, which is the time between infection and infectiousness. It is now thought that people can be infectious before showing symptoms, and so the latent period is shorter than the incubation period.
An imported case occurs when a traveler is infected in one area and is reported as sick in another area. Local transmission occurs if that traveler infects others, or if there is a cluster of cases locally and the spread is easily traced. Community transmission occurs when there is no clear source of infection.
Infectivity can be measured using R0. R0 is important epidemiology jargon, short for reproduction number. It is the number of cases, on average, that an infected person will cause during their infectious period. So if R0 =2, then an infected person will infect an average of 2 other people while they are infectious. There are two important variants of the R0. The basic reproduction number represents the maximum potential of a pathogen to infect people – basically what would happen if an infectious person entered a community with no prior immunity. The effective reproductive number describes the current vulnerability of a population based on whether people have immunity thanks to vaccination or prior exposure. The effective R0 decreases over the course of the outbreak. Note that both basic and effective reproduction number depend on factors such as environment and demographics in addition to the pathogen’s infectiousness. The goal of public health interventions is to bring R0 down to less than 1, as this would cause the disease to die out over time.
The seasonal flu has an R0 ranging from 0.9 – 2.1. There is a lot of debate about the R0 of COVID-19, with estimates from more recent data ranging from 2.7-4.2. The variance in these estimates is largely due to differing model assumptions and a lack of data. For example, models which assume the possibility of being infectious before symptom onset have estimates that are around 0.5 higher.
These high R0 estimates mean there is much greater potential for spread of COVID-19 than for the flu. How much greater? For the purpose of this example, let’s say that the flu has an R0 of 1.5 and COVID-19 has an R0 of 3. After three cycles of infection, 11 people have had the flu, and 40 people have been infected with COVID-19. After ten cycles of infection, this becomes 171 people with the flu, and over 88,000 people with COVID-19.

3D Models from:

x

Is Coronavirus COVID-19 Airborne?

Watch the full Coronavirus course for FREE at: (certificate available for a small fee).

How does COVID-19 spread?

CDC’s Dr. Nancy Messonnier recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy:


This video can also be viewed at

3D Animation: SARS-CoV-2 virus transmission leading to COVID-19

Thanks to the brilliant team at Helix Animation for this 3D animation outlining the most common ways of transmitting the coronavirus SARS=CoV-2 based on the latest relevant scientific research available (March 2020).

Please note that the knowledge of this infectious disease and its transmission, as well as on this novel coronavirus, is still incomplete and evolving. Facts may change over time as the outbreak is ongoing with the latest updates found at:

As typical for 3D visualizations, the overall virus representation is an artistic depiction, and the surface proteins density and distribution have been simplified, in order the entire audience to easily grasp the most prominent features of this virus.

In light of the united global effort, we would like to provide free usage of this video and/or any of the imagery shown, as long as it is properly credited (including the logo and the full text in the lower left corner). Thus, if you’d like to use it, please drop us a line via our contact section at (Video/Imagery Usage) and we’ll get back to you with the video/imagery files.

Five things to know about COVID-19 transmission

People can catch COVID-19 from others who have the virus. The disease spreads primarily from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth, which are expelled when a person with COVID-19 coughs, sneezes, or speaks. These droplets are relatively heavy, do not travel far and quickly sink to the ground. People can catch COVID-19 if they breathe in these droplets from a person infected with the virus. This is why it is important to stay at least 1 meter) away from others. These droplets can land on objects and surfaces around the person such as tables, doorknobs and handrails. People can become infected by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. This is why it is important to wash your hands regularly with soap and water or clean with alcohol-based hand rub.

WHO is assessing ongoing research on the ways that COVID-19 is spread and will continue to share updated findings.

Learn more:

COVID-19 numbers, August 3: Four states grapple with local virus transmission | ABC News

The impact of COVID-19 is again being felt across the country.

Four states are now dealing with local transmission of the virus.

ABC analyst Casey Briggs reports.

#ABCNews #Coronavirus

For more from ABC News, click here:
You can watch more ABC News content on iview:

Subscribe to us on YouTube:
Go deeper on our ABC News In-depth channel:
You can also like us on Facebook:
Or follow us on Instagram:
Or even on Twitter:

How to restart tourism during a pandemic? | COVID-19 Special

We all feel like we need a break from the coronavirus, but going on vacation during a pandemic is far from straightforward. That is, if it's even possible. Is it okay to jet off with the family? And where do you go? The rules are changing quickly depending on what you decide. In the past few days, the French city of Nice has made face masks compulsory in public areas.
The industry faces huge losses. Now people who depend on tourism hope that the coming month will bring a turnaround... as visitors put the lockdown behind them.
Subscribe:

For more news go to:
Follow DW on social media:
►Facebook:
►Twitter:
►Instagram:
Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie:
#Coronavirus #Covid19 #Tourism
x

The Best Way to Prevent Getting Coronavirus - *NEW* Respokare® N95 Respirator Mask

There is a brand new N95 respirator mask that is NOW available to the public. It’s also a lot more comfortable compared to other N95 masks, and also has the added benefit of inactivating viral and bacterial proteins.

Here is the link:



The TRUTH of How Coronavirus Spreads and How to Prevent Coronavirus:
Watch Now:

How can you prevent inhaling the virus? The best thing you can do to prevent inhaling the virus into your lungs…Is to wear an N95 mask or an elastomeric mask. N95 respirators are tight-fitting and filter out at least 95% of airborne particles as small as 0.3 microns. But, the CDC recommends the public not to purchase these, and not to wear these.

And there are multiple reasons for that. These n95 masks are being reserved for health care workers. And Amazon will not sell them right now. They’re also uncomfortable, and your voice gets muffled, or make you feel smothered. It partially obstructs airflow in and out of your mouth and nostrils, so if you have an underlying lung condition, like COPD emphysema, probably not something you can tolerate for very long. Also, these have to fit properly on your face to be effective, and in order to do so, you can’t have most types of facial hair, because that can disrupt a good seal of the mask. An elastomeric respirator is a reusable device with exchangeable cartridge filters. Like an N95 respirator, it also filters out at least 95% of airborne particles as small as 0.3 microns. It fits tight against the user's face but is more comfortable than an N95. Before reusing the mask, all its surfaces need to be wiped down with a disinfectant.

So although both of these are not perfect, they are very effective at preventing inhalation of the virus. So these are the best way to prevent inhaling coronavirus, as well as other viruses like influenza and measles, but wearing these is not necessarily a practical thing to do. But, then, just last week, another doctor saw my video on airborne transmission, and messaged me on Instagram, asking me if I heard about this new Respokare® NIOSH N95 mask. And so I looked it up online and did a bunch of research on it. The company that makes the mask is Innonix. At first, I thought this would be some sort of gimmicky mask, but I was wrong.

I was impressed enough to reach out to them and ask if I could review the mask and possibly make a video about it, and they sent me a few samples, and here we are. Just like a regular N95, such as this one that we use in the hospital, made by the company 3M, this mask will filter out particles as small as 0.3 microns. It’s also listed on the CDC’s website of NIOSH-Approved N95 Respirators. It’s also FDA approved. So what sets this mask apart from a regular N95 mask? Several things, actually. For one, it's much more comfortable to wear. You’ve probably seen pictures of health care workers with marks and lines and even bruising on their faces as a result of wearing N95s. And from my personal experience, they’re just not comfortable, especially for more than an hour or two of use. The company also claims that it can “inactivate up to 99.9% of particles within minutes,” So not only trapping viruses and bacteria but destroying them too.
This new KN95 Respokare mask has 4 layers, and the innermost layer is built of soft materials to ensure comfort during periods of long-wear, and is also water-resistant, which is also nice.

On top of that are 3 more layers, that serve to not only trap fine particles, but one of the layers contains copper and zinc ions which serve to destruct viruses and bacteria. Also, the outermost layer has an acidic coating, creating a low pH environment, which helps to destroy viral and bacterial proteins. Unfortunately, I was not able to find any published evidence of this in a medical journal. They also show tables of which viruses and bacteria become activated with a few minutes. So this includes not only coronavirus, but also other viruses and bacteria that can become airborne, like influenza, measles, and some bacteria like tuberculosis, and also helps to prevent inhaling allergens, and pollution. So this is something I am going to buy more of, not only for myself, my friends and family. Also, if you are around other people, don’t forget to protect your eyes with goggles, or glasses that don’t let air in. And try not to touch your face or mask without having clean hands.

Coronavirus | COVID-19 YouTube Video Playlist:


Dr. Mike Hansen, MD
Internal Medicine | Pulmonary Disease | Critical Care Medicine
Website:
Instagram Account:

#coronavirus #covid19

Dating, partnership and loneliness in times of the coronavirus crisis | COVID-19 Special

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, many countries around the world have travel bans in place. The closure of international borders is also holding international unmarried couples apart from each other. Many of them have started campaigning, saying Love Is Not Tourism.

Subscribe:

For more news go to:
Follow DW on social media:
►Facebook:
►Twitter:
►Instagram:
Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie:
#Covid19 #Coronavirus #LoveIsNotTourism

Coronavirus: California health secretary provides update on COVID-19 testing and spread in state

Dr. Mark Ghaly, the California Health & Human Services secretary, was providing updates on Aug. 4 regarding COVID-19 testing and spread in state. #COVID19 #coronavirus #California

Coronavirus Transmission | COVID-19 | Wash Hands | Stay Home | sqadia.com

Novel Coronavirus or COVID-19 has caused one of the worst pandemic, in recent history.

The easy mode of transmission of this virus has caused it to spread across the world.

There are multiple ways the virus can transfer, that are highlighted in this coronavirus transmission Microbiology video lecture.

-------------------------------------------------------------
Watch complete lecture on sqadia.com -

-------------------------------------------------------------

Superspreaders: How do they affect the coronavirus pandemic? | COVID19 Special

When looking at the spread of coronavirus, a few incidences saw individuals spread the disease to hundreds and even thousands. So-called super-spreading events guide the preventive measures in place today, measures aimed at groups most likely to infect others.
Subscribe:

For more news go to:
Follow DW on social media:
►Facebook:
►Twitter:
►Instagram:
Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie:
#Superspreader #Coronavirus #Covid-19
x

COVID-19 Update 11: How exactly the coronavirus becomes airborne.

Different diseases have different modes of transmission. And at the same time, one disease can have multiple modes of transmission. Influenza that’s transmitted by aerosols is generally thought to be associated with a more severe illness than influenza that’s transmitted via contact or fomites.

In this video we continue on from update #10 and examine in greater detail the impact of particle size, the concentration of viral RNA in coarse and fine aerosols, and how they differ in the transmission of COVID-19.

Surprisingly, larger particles (from a cough or sneeze) contain less virus than small particles, and are less likely to penetrate into lungs. Individuals who are sick produce fine, virus laden particles during speaking and breathing that have a high viral load and can travel far down into the lungs of a susceptible individual.

#medmastery #coronavirus #COVID19 #sarscov2 #coronaviruschina #coronavirustruth #coronavirusdeaths #WHO #wuhan #infection #pandemic #publichealth

-----------------------------------------------------------
Links for reference:


-----------------------------------------------------------
More updates by Dr. Wiesbauer:
COVID-19 Update 1: How to tell if a pandemic is likely to occur or not–R0 and the serial interval:
COVID-19 Update 2: How to stop an epidemic - Herd immunity:
COVID-19 Update 3: Symptoms of COVID-19:
COVID-19 Update 4: Clinical characteristics of COVID-19:
COVID-19 Update 5: Estimating case fatality rates for COVID-19:
COVID-19 Update 6: Seasonality: will COVID-19 go away in the summer?:
COVID-19 Update 7: This is probably the most important picture of the whole Coronavirus-epidemic:
COVID-19 Update 8: Zinc and chloroquine for the treatment of COVID-19?:
COVID-19 Update 9: Hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for the treatment of COVID-19–Review of study by Didier Raoult:
COVID-19 Update 10: Is COVID-19 an airborne disease? Will we all need to wear face-masks against SARS-CoV-2?
-----------------------------------------------------------
Useful resources:
For checking daily developments of cases, deaths and more:



Other useful resources:
Journal Watch:

New England Journal of Medicine:

Github collaboration:

CDC:

WHO:

Nucleuswealth:

-------
Speaker: Franz Wiesbauer, MD MPH
Internist & Founder at Medmastery
LinkedIn:
PubMed:

Check out our course library and register for a free trial account:

Facebook:
Twitter:

Please Note: Medmastery's videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical education and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your doctor or health care provider.

Coronavirus update August 1st: Masks recommended in Sydney transmission hotspots | ABC News

A young Melbourne doctor is one of at least three Victorian healthcare workers who have been in intensive care after catching coronavirus at work.

The state's frontline staff say they have been put at unacceptable risk and are demanding better protective equipment at work.

In Queensland health authorities have issued a public health alert updating the locations of concern following another case yesterday, linked to two women who contracted the virus in Melbourne.

00:00 COVID-19 crisis Melbourne
04:05 COVID-19 crisis Sydney
06:35 COVID-19 crisis Brisbane
9:56 WHO reports - largest one-day increase in cases
10.31 UK infection rate appears to be on the rise


Read more here:

For more from ABC News, click here:
You can watch more ABC News content on iview:

Subscribe to us on YouTube:
Go deeper on our ABC News In-depth channel:
You can also like us on Facebook:
Or follow us on Instagram:
Or even on Twitter:

Transmission of the COVID-19 coronavirus

Dr. Eleni Galanis of the BC Centre for Disease Control answers questions about the COVID-19 coronavirus.

COVID-19: Huffing joggers, cyclists less likely to transmit coronavirus | Vancouver Sun

Dr. Bonnie Henry gives her daily coronavirus update.
___

About: Since 1912, the Vancouver Sun has cast a watchful eye on the events, issues and politics of the day – all with a unique West Coast perspective. Publishing Monday through Saturday in print and daily online at vancouversun.com, we are proud to be B.C.’s largest newsroom and are dedicated to telling the stories of our vibrant community.

Connect with the Vancouver Sun Online:
Visit vancouversun.com:
Subscribe to the Vancouver Sun:
Find the Vancouver Sun on Facebook:
Follow the Vancouver Sun on Twitter:
Follow the Vancouver Sun on Instagram:

Trump falsely claims kids 'almost immune' from coronavirus

President Trump argued that children should return to US schools because they’re “almost” or “virtually immune” from the coronavirus. Even though children are less susceptible to the virus, they can still transmit it to others in their household or within their communities.
Trump said he would get media criticism for using the term “totally immune,” adding, “but the fact is that they are virtually immune from this problem.” Later, Facebook said it had removed a post from President Donald Trump's page for containing false claims about Covid-19.
The post was the video of the interview the President gave to Fox News.
This video includes false claims that a group of people is immune from Covid-19 which is a violation of our policies around harmful Covid misinformation, Facebook spokesperson Andy Stone said in a statement.
Stone added the specific comments that had run afoul of Facebook's rules were Trump's false claims about children being almost immune to the virus.
The same clip appears to have also been posted to Twitter by the Trump campaign, which was then shared from the President's main account.

#Trump #CNN #News

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu