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How the Universe Works - From The Big Bang To The Present Day - Space Discovery Documentary

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How the Universe Works - From The Big Bang To The Present Day - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - From The Big Bang To The Present Day - Space Discovery Documentary
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How the Universe Works | Black Hole And High Energy Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Dark Future Of The Sun - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works: From The Big Bang To The Present Day - Documentary

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How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

Finding a New Earth: Exoplanets and the Habitable Zone - Space Science Documentary

Discovering thousands of planets beyond our solar system counts as a “eureka” moment in human exploration. But the biggest payoff is yet to come: capturing evidence of a distant world hospitable to life.
We begin the search on familiar ground. On this planet, currently our sole example of a life-bearing world, the need for water is non-negotiable. So astronomers search the cosmos for similar environments. Around almost every “normal” star, including our sun, we can draw a band of potential habitability: the right distance and temperature for liquid water to exist. The key, of course, is a planetary surface where the water could pool. Both stars and planets come in many types and sizes, and the interplay of these factors determines the extent and influence of this “habitable zone.”

A giant, hot-burning star’s habitable zone would be found at a much greater distance than that of a smaller, cooler stellar dwarf. And if we stick with the plan—hunting first for what we know—then small, rocky worlds are our best bet for finding evidence of life as we know it (we’ll talk about “life as we don’t know it” in the next section).

So the ideal candidate is an Earth-sized, rocky world nestled comfortably within its star’s habitable zone—though scientists’ understanding of what makes up a habitable zone continues to evolve.
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How the Universe Works - Big-Bang Theory - Origin of Universe And The Solar System

The term evolution usually refers to the biological evolution of living things. But the processes by which planets, stars, galaxies, and the universe form and change over time are also types of evolution. In all of these cases there is change over time, although the processes involved are quite different.

In the late 1920s the American astronomer Edwin Hubble made a very interesting and important discovery. Hubble made observations that he interpreted as showing that distant stars and galaxies are receding from Earth in every direction. Moreover, the velocities of recession increase in proportion with distance, a discovery that has been confirmed by numerous and repeated measurements since Hubble's time. The implication of these findings is that the universe is expanding.

Hubble's hypothesis of an expanding universe leads to certain deductions. One is that the universe was more condensed at a previous time. From this deduction came the suggestion that all the currently observed matter and energy in the universe were initially condensed in a very small and infinitely hot mass. A huge explosion, known as the Big Bang, then sent matter and energy expanding in all directions.

Origins of the Universe 101 | National Geographic

How old is the universe, and how did it begin? Throughout history, countless myths and scientific theories have tried to explain the universe's origins. The most widely accepted explanation is the big bang theory. Learn about the explosion that started it all and how the universe grew from the size of an atom to encompass everything in existence today.
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How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 1 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 1 - Space Discovery Documentary

The Beginning of Everything -- The Big Bang

How did everything get started?

Has the universe a beginning or was it here since forever? Well, evidence suggests that there was indeed a starting point to this universe we are part of right now. But how can this be? How can something come from nothing? And what about time? We don't have all the answers yet so let's talk about what we know.

Also, we try to make this one not depressing. Tell us if we succeeded.



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The Beginning of Everything -- The Big Bang

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How The Universe Began- Full Documentary

The most popular theory of our universe's origin centers on a cosmic cataclysm unmatched in all of history—the Big Bang. This theory was born of the observation that other galaxies are moving away from our own at great speed, in all directions, as if they had all been propelled by an ancient explosive force. What Is the Big Bang Theory? Before the big bang, scientists believe the entire vastness of the observable universe, including all of its matter and radiation, was compressed into a hot, dense mass just a few millimeters across. This nearly incomprehensible state is theorized to have existed for just a fraction of the first second of time.

Big bang proponents suggest that some 10 billion to 20 billion years ago, a massive blast allowed all the universe's known matter and energy—even space and time themselves—to spring from some ancient and unknown type of energy.

The theory maintains that, in the instant—a trillion-trillionth of a second—after the big bang, the universe expanded with incomprehensible speed from its pebble-size origin to astronomical scope. Expansion has apparently continued, but much more slowly, over the ensuing billions of years.

Scientists can't be sure exactly how the universe evolved after the big bang. Many believe that as time passed and matter cooled, more diverse kinds of atoms began to form, and they eventually condensed into the stars and galaxies of our present universe.

Origins of the Theory

A Belgian priest named Georges Lemaître first suggested the big bang theory in the 1920s when he theorized that the universe began from a single primordial atom. The idea subsequently received major boosts by Edwin Hubble's observations that galaxies are speeding away from us in all directions, and from the discovery of cosmic microwave radiation by Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson.

The glow of cosmic microwave background radiation, which is found throughout the universe, is thought to be a tangible remnant of leftover light from the big bang. The radiation is akin to that used to transmit TV signals via antennas. But it is the oldest radiation known and may hold many secrets about the universe's earliest moments.

The big bang theory leaves several major questions unanswered. One is the original cause of the big bang itself. Several answers have been proposed to address this fundamental question, but none has been proven—and even adequately testing them has proven to be a formidable challenge.

According to the predictions of Einstein's General Relativity, a static Universe would be gravitationally unstable; everything needed to either be moving away from one another or collapsing towards one another if the fabric of space obeyed his laws. The observation of this apparent recession taught us that the Universe was expanding today, and if things are getting farther apart as time goes on, it means they were closer together in the distant past.

How The Universe Was Created | The Big Bang | Short Space Documentary

Part of the Universe Project. A seven episode mini series about the universe.
This video is purely for entertainment purposes.
All video, photo and music licenses are available.

Please enjoy the episode (short documentary) about the Big Bang. The event that formed the universe we can observe today. An unbelievable event which created all the matter around us. How could this event have happened?

This episode answer a small portion of how the universe works; the big bang theory
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Beyond the Big Bang Documentary HD 720p

The universe began with a massive expansion, billions and billions of years ago, and it continues to expand with every passing second. The idea that the universe, and man's very existence, began with a Big Bang is no longer a topic of debate among most scientists--it is essentially taken as fact. Thanks for watching Please Like, Share, Comment and Subscribe.

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How many planets are in the solar system? How did it form in the Milky Way galaxy? Learn facts about the solar system’s genesis, plus its planets, moons, and asteroids.
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Big Bang Theory Beyond The Big Bang Explosion Space Documentary 4

How the Universe works - Space time (Documentary)

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The Universe is all of space and time[a] and their contents, including planets, stars, galaxies, and all other forms of matter and energy. While the spatial size of the entire Universe is still unknown, it is possible to measure the observable universe.

The earliest scientific models of the Universe were developed by ancient Greek and Indian philosophers and were geocentric, placing Earth at the centre of the Universe. Over the centuries, more precise astronomical observations led Nicolaus Copernicus to develop the heliocentric model with the Sun at the centre of the Solar System. In developing the law of universal gravitation, Sir Isaac Newton built upon Copernicus' work as well as observations by Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler's laws of planetary motion.

Further observational improvements led to the realization that our Sun is one of hundreds of billions of stars in a galaxy we call the Milky Way, which is one of at least hundreds of billions of galaxies in the Universe. Many of the stars in our galaxy have planets. At the largest scale galaxies are distributed uniformly and the same in all directions, meaning that the Universe has neither an edge nor a center. At smaller scales, galaxies are distributed in clusters and superclusters which form immense filaments and voids in space, creating a vast foam-like structure. Discoveries in the early 20th century have suggested that the Universe had a beginning and that space has been expanding since then, and is currently still expanding at an increasing rate.

The Big Bang theory is the prevailing cosmological description of the development of the Universe. Under this theory, space and time emerged together 13.799±0.021 billion years ago[2] with a fixed amount of energy and matter that has become less dense as the Universe has expanded. After an initial accelerated expansion at around 10−32 seconds, and the separation of the four known fundamental forces, the Universe gradually cooled and continued to expand, allowing the first subatomic particles and simple atoms to form. Dark matter gradually gathered forming a foam-like structure of filaments and voids under the influence of gravity. Giant clouds of hydrogen and helium were gradually drawn to the places where dark matter was most dense, forming the first galaxies, stars, and everything else seen today. It is possible to see objects that are now further away than 13.799 billion light-years because space itself has expanded, and it is still expanding today. This means that objects which are now up to 46 billion light years away can still be seen in their distant past, because in the past when their light was emitted, they were much closer to the Earth.

From studying the movement of galaxies, it has been discovered that the universe contains much more matter than is accounted for by visible objects; stars, galaxies, nebulas and interstellar gas. This unseen matter is known as dark matter (dark means that there is a wide range of strong indirect evidence that it exists, but we have not yet detected it directly). The Lambda-CDM model is the most widely accepted model of our universe. It suggests that about 69.2%±1.2% [2015] of the mass and energy in the universe is a scalar field known as dark energy which is responsible for the current expansion of space, and about 25.8% [2015] is dark matter. Ordinary (baryonic) matter is therefore only 4.9% [2015] of the physical universe. Stars, planets, and visible gas clouds only form about 6% of ordinary matter, or about 0.3% of the entire universe.

There are many competing hypotheses about the ultimate fate of the universe and about what, if anything, preceded the Big Bang, while other physicists and philosophers refuse to speculate, doubting that information about prior states will ever be accessible. Some physicists have suggested various multiverse hypotheses, in which the Universe might be one among many universes that likewise exist.

(Review by Wikipedia)



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How Universe Was Made | Before The Big Bang - Space Documentary

In the first second after the universe began, the surrounding temperature was about 10 billion degrees Fahrenheit (5.5 billion Celsius), according to NASA. The cosmos contained a vast array of fundamental particles such as neutrons, electrons and protons. These decayed or combined as the universe got cooler.

This early soup would have been impossible to look at, because light could not carry inside of it. The free electrons would have caused light (photons) to scatter the way sunlight scatters from the water droplets in clouds, NASA stated. Over time, however, the free electrons met up with nuclei and created neutral atoms. This allowed light to shine through about 380,000 years after the Big Bang.

This early light — sometimes called the afterglow of the Big Bang — is more properly known as the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It was first predicted by Ralph Alpher and other scientists in 1948, but was found only by accident almost 20 years later. [Images: Peering Back to the Big Bang & Early Universe]

Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, both of Bell Telephone Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey, were building a radio receiver in 1965 and picking up higher-than-expected temperatures, according to NASA. At first, they thought the anomaly was due to pigeons and their dung, but even after cleaning up the mess and killing pigeons that tried to roost inside the antenna, the anomaly persisted.

Simultaneously, a Princeton University team (led by Robert Dicke) was trying to find evidence of the CMB, and realized that Penzias and Wilson had stumbled upon it. The teams each published papers in the Astrophysical Journal in 1965.
#Space #Documentary #BigBang
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From Nothing To Everything - How The Universe Works

Almost 14 billion years ago the big bang exploded the universe into life, from a region smaller than the size of an atom to the universe in a matter of seconds, from nothing to everything.

What Came Before the Big Bang?

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Modern science seems to agree that our universe began with a monumental explosion, but do we know what came before the Big Bang? Watch to find out!

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How the Universe Works - From The Big Bang To The Present Day - Documentary

How the Universe Works - From The Big Bang To The Present Day - Space Discovery Documentary
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How the Universe Works - Secret History of Mercury - Space Discovery Documentary

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The Mercury Atmosphere and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) instrument aboard NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft was designed to study both the exosphere and surface of the planet Mercury. To learn more about the minerals and surface processes on Mercury, the Visual and Infrared Spectrometer (VIRS) portion of MASCS has been diligently collecting single tracks of spectral surface measurements since MESSENGER entered Mercury orbit on March 17, 2011. The track coverage is now extensive enough that the spectral properties of both broad terrains and small, distinct features such as pyroclastic vents and fresh craters can be studied. To accentuate the geological context of the spectral measurements, the MASCS data have been overlain on the monochrome mosiac from the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS), an instrument with wide- and narrow-angle cameras to map the rugged landforms and spectral variations on Mercury’s surface. Click on the image to explore the colorful diversity of surface materials in more detail!

The MESSENGER spacecraft is the first ever to orbit the planet Mercury, and the spacecraft's seven scientific instruments and radio science investigation are unraveling the history and evolution of the solar system's innermost planet. In the mission's more than four years of orbital operations, MESSENGER has acquired over 250,000 images and extensive other data sets. MESSENGER's highly successful orbital mission is about to come to an end, as the spacecraft runs out of propellant and the force of solar gravity causes it to impact the surface of Mercury near the end of April 2015.

How the Universe Works - Alien Storms & Black Holes - Space Discovery Documentary

At the centre of some black holes is 'an area where space and time exists' Colonies of aliens living on planets within black holes may not be as far-fetched as it sounds. Some black holes have a complex internal structure that allows photons, particles and planets to orbit a central singularity, according to one scientist. A singularity is the region in a black hole when space and time become infinite. However, Professor Vyacheslav Dokuchaev claims that at the centre of certain black holes, and under the right conditions, is an area where the fabric of space and time exists once more. If a charged and rotating black hole is large enough, he said, it can weaken the tidal forces that are beyond the event horizon - the point where nothing, not even light, can escape a black hole's gravity.

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