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How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 3 - Space Discovery Documentary

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How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 3 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 3 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

Search for Second Earth' tells the story of an extraordinary odyssey, a scientific and human story that began 500 years ago with Copernicus and Galileo. And it takes us beyond the stars to the far reaches of the universe in search of life somewhere other than Earth. To date, astronomers have detected over 3000 planets located outside the solar system. When one thinks that twenty years ago, the only planets we could observe were those in our own solar system, this is both a revolution and a revelation. With the construction of giant telescopes, thousands or even millions of other worlds will soon be discovered. These so-called exoplanets are all very different. But could any of them support life? The most recent research shows that life is much more tenacious and resilient than we once thought. Are we alone in the universe? This question, which for so long was chiefly a religious and philosophical one, has now become rational and scientific. If other inhabited planets exist, how can we detect them? How can we discover what flora, fauna or even what kind of strange civilisations they may host? And above all, how do we get there? This documentary offers secondary science teachers stimulus materials to help students to imagine the future possibility of humans making an as-yet impossible voyage into the cosmos in search of the life forms that might be found there. Search for Second Earth explores a voyage into the infinite, which will also teach us a great deal about our own planet and the origins of life here.
#universedocumentary #spacedocumentary #Universe
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How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 1 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 1 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Dark History of the Solar System - Space Discovery Documentary

Our solar system hides a dark and violent past, and new discoveries reveal that Earth and the planets were formed from the destruction of strange alien worlds that came before us.
#universedocumentary #spacedocumentary #Universe
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How The Universe Works - Universe Explore - Space Discovery Documentary

Search for Second Earth' tells the story of an extraordinary odyssey, a scientific and human story that began 500 years ago with Copernicus and Galileo. And it takes us beyond the stars to the far reaches of the universe in search of life somewhere other than Earth. To date, astronomers have detected over 3000 planets located outside the solar system. When one thinks that twenty years ago, the only planets we could observe were those in our own solar system, this is both a revolution and a revelation. With the construction of giant telescopes, thousands or even millions of other worlds will soon be discovered. These so-called exoplanets are all very different. But could any of them support life? The most recent research shows that life is much more tenacious and resilient than we once thought. Are we alone in the universe? This question, which for so long was chiefly a religious and philosophical one, has now become rational and scientific. If other inhabited planets exist, how can we detect them? How can we discover what flora, fauna or even what kind of strange civilisations they may host? And above all, how do we get there? This documentary offers secondary science teachers stimulus materials to help students to imagine the future possibility of humans making an as-yet impossible voyage into the cosmos in search of the life forms that might be found there. Search for Second Earth explores a voyage into the infinite, which will also teach us a great deal about our own planet and the origins of life here.
#universedocumentary #spacedocumentary #Universe

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 2 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 2 - Space Discovery Documentary
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How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe Part 12 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe Part 12 - Space Discovery Documentary
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How the Universe Works - Planets in Our Solar System and black hole - Space Discovery Documentary

A supermassive black hole (SMBH) is the largest type of black hole, on the order of hundreds of thousands to billions of solar masses (M?), and is found in the center of almost all massive galaxies. In the case of the Milky Way, the SMBH corresponds with the location of Sagittarius A*.

Supermassive black holes have properties that distinguish them from lower-mass classifications. First, the average density of a supermassive black hole (defined as the mass of the black hole divided by the volume within its Schwarzschild radius) can be less than the density of water in the case of some supermassive black holes. This is because the Schwarzschild radius is directly proportional to mass, while density is inversely proportional to the volume. Since the volume of a spherical object (such as the event horizon of a non-rotating black hole) is directly proportional to the cube of the radius, the minimum density of a black hole is inversely proportional to the square of the mass, and thus higher mass black holes have lower average density. In addition, the tidal forces in the vicinity of the event horizon are significantly weaker for massive black holes. As with density, the tidal force on a body at the event horizon is inversely proportional to the square of the mass: a person on the surface of the Earth and one at the event horizon of a 10 million M? black hole experience about the same tidal force between their head and feet. Unlike with stellar mass black holes, one would not experience significant tidal force until very deep into the black hole.
#Universe #Space #Documentary

How the Universe Works - Latest Secrets of The Solar System - Space Discovery Documentary

The formation and evolution of the Solar System began 4.6 billion years ago with the gravitational collapse of a small part of a giant molecular cloud. Most of the collapsing mass collected in the center, forming the Sun, while the rest flattened into a protoplanetary disk out of which the planets, moons, asteroids, and other small Solar System bodies formed.

This model, known as the nebular hypothesis was first developed in the 18th century by Emanuel Swedenborg, Immanuel Kant, and Pierre-Simon Laplace. Its subsequent development has interwoven a variety of scientific disciplines including astronomy, physics, geology, and planetary science. Since the dawn of the space age in the 1950s and the discovery of extrasolar planets in the 1990s, the model has been both challenged and refined to account for new observations.

The Solar System has evolved considerably since its initial formation. Many moons have formed from circling discs of gas and dust around their parent planets, while other moons are thought to have formed independently and later been captured by their planets. Still others, such as Earth's Moon, may be the result of giant collisions. Collisions between bodies have occurred continually up to the present day and have been central to the evolution of the Solar System. The positions of the planets might have shifted due to gravitational interactions. This planetary migration is now thought to have been responsible for much of the Solar System's early evolution.

In roughly 5 billion years, the Sun will cool and expand outward to many times its current diameter (becoming a red giant), before casting off its outer layers as a planetary nebula and leaving behind a stellar remnant known as a white dwarf. In the far distant future, the gravity of passing stars will gradually reduce the Sun's retinue of planets. Some planets will be destroyed, others ejected into interstellar space. Ultimately, over the course of tens of billions of years, it is likely that the Sun will be left with none of the original bodies in orbit around it
#Universe #Space #Documentary

How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe Part 11 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe Part 11 - Space Discovery Documentary
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How the Universe Works - From The Big Bang To The Present Day - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - From The Big Bang To The Present Day - Space Discovery Documentary
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How the Universe Works | Black Hole And High Energy Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Dark Future Of The Sun - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary
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How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe Part 10 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe Part 10 - Space Discovery Documentary
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How the Universe Works | Black Hole And High Energy Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Dark Future Of The Sun - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe Part 5 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - The Story of Earth Part 2 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - The Story of Earth Part 2 - Space Discovery Documentary

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Next Videos
How the Universe Works | Black Hole And High Energy Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Dark Future Of The Sun - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe Part 5 - Space Discovery Documentary
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How the Universe Works - The Dark Matter Enigma - Space Discovery Documentary

Explore the biggest question of all. How far do the stars stretch out into space? And what's beyond them? In modern times, we built giant telescopes that have allowed us to cast our gaze deep into the universe. Astronomers have been able to look back to near the time of its birth. They've reconstructed the course of cosmic history in astonishing detail. From intensive computer modeling, and myriad close observations, they've uncovered important clues to its ongoing evolution. Many now conclude that what we can see, the stars and galaxies that stretch out to the limits of our vision, represent only a small fraction of all there is. Does the universe go on forever? Where do we fit within it? And how would the great thinkers have wrapped their brains around the far-out ideas on today's cutting edge? For those who find infinity hard to grasp, even troubling, you're not alone. It's a concept that has long tormented even the best minds. Over two thousand years ago, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras and his followers saw numerical relationships as the key to understanding the world around them. But in their investigation of geometric shapes, they discovered that some important ratios could not be expressed in simple numbers. Take the circumference of a circle to its diameter, called Pi. Computer scientists recently calculated Pi to 5 trillion digits, confirming what the Greeks learned: there are no repeating patterns and no ending in sight. The discovery of the so-called irrational numbers like Pi was so disturbing, legend has it, that one member of the Pythagorian cult, Hippassus, was drowned at sea for divulging their existence. A century later, the philosopher Zeno brought infinity into the open with a series of paradoxes: situations that are true, but strongly counter-intuitive. In this modern update of one of Zeno's paradoxes, say you have arrived at an intersection. But you are only allowed to cross the street in increments of half the distance to the other side. So to cross this finite distance, you must take an infinite number of steps. In math today, it's a given that you can subdivide any length an infinite number of times, or find an infinity of points along a line. What made the idea of infinity so troubling to the Greeks is that it clashed with their goal of using numbers to explain the workings of the real world. To the philosopher Aristotle, a century after Zeno, infinity evoked the formless chaos from which the world was thought to have emerged: a primordial state with no natural laws or limits, devoid of all form and content. But if the universe is finite, what would happen if a warrior traveled to the edge and tossed a spear? Where would it go? It would not fly off on an infinite journey, Aristotle said. Rather, it would join the motion of the stars in a crystalline sphere that encircled the Earth. To preserve the idea of a limited universe, Aristotle would craft an historic distinction. On the one hand, Aristotle pointed to the irrational numbers such as Pi. Each new calculation results in an additional digit, but the final, final number in the string can never be specified. So Aristotle called it potentially infinite. Then there's the actually infinite, like the total number of points or subdivisions along a line. It's literally uncountable. Aristotle reserved the status of actually infinite for the so-called prime mover that created the world and is beyond our capacity to understand. This became the basis for what's called the Cosmological, or First Cause, argument for the existence of God. #universedocumentary #spacedocumentary #Universe

How the Universe Works - Formation of the Solar System

The formation and evolution of the Solar System began 4.6 billion years ago with the gravitational collapse of a small part of a giant molecular cloud. Most of the collapsing mass collected in the center, forming the Sun, while the rest flattened into a protoplanetary disk out of which the planets, moons, asteroids, and other small Solar System bodies formed.

This model, known as the nebular hypothesis was first developed in the 18th century by Emanuel Swedenborg, Immanuel Kant, and Pierre-Simon Laplace. Its subsequent development has interwoven a variety of scientific disciplines including astronomy, physics, geology, and planetary science. Since the dawn of the space age in the 1950s and the discovery of extrasolar planets in the 1990s, the model has been both challenged and refined to account for new observations.

The Solar System has evolved considerably since its initial formation. Many moons have formed from circling discs of gas and dust around their parent planets, while other moons are thought to have formed independently and later been captured by their planets. Still others, such as Earth's Moon, may be the result of giant collisions. Collisions between bodies have occurred continually up to the present day and have been central to the evolution of the Solar System. The positions of the planets might have shifted due to gravitational interactions. This planetary migration is now thought to have been responsible for much of the Solar System's early evolution.

In roughly 5 billion years, the Sun will cool and expand outward to many times its current diameter (becoming a red giant), before casting off its outer layers as a planetary nebula and leaving behind a stellar remnant known as a white dwarf. In the far distant future, the gravity of passing stars will gradually reduce the Sun's retinue of planets. Some planets will be destroyed, others ejected into interstellar space. Ultimately, over the course of tens of billions of years, it is likely that the Sun will be left with none of the original bodies in orbit around it
Thanks for watching Please Like, Share, Comment and Subscribe
► Welcome to ! How the Universe Works
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Next Videos
How the Universe Works | Black Hole And High Energy Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Dark Future Of The Sun - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe Part 5 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works National Geographic The Universe Space Discovery Documentary

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How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

Explore the biggest question of all. How far do the stars stretch out into space? And what's beyond them? In modern times, we built giant telescopes that have allowed us to cast our gaze deep into the universe. Astronomers have been able to look back to near the time of its birth. They've reconstructed the course of cosmic history in astonishing detail. From intensive computer modeling, and myriad close observations, they've uncovered important clues to its ongoing evolution. Many now conclude that what we can see, the stars and galaxies that stretch out to the limits of our vision, represent only a small fraction of all there is. Does the universe go on forever? Where do we fit within it? And how would the great thinkers have wrapped their brains around the far-out ideas on today's cutting edge? For those who find infinity hard to grasp, even troubling, you're not alone. It's a concept that has long tormented even the best minds. Over two thousand years ago, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras and his followers saw numerical relationships as the key to understanding the world around them. But in their investigation of geometric shapes, they discovered that some important ratios could not be expressed in simple numbers. Take the circumference of a circle to its diameter, called Pi. Computer scientists recently calculated Pi to 5 trillion digits, confirming what the Greeks learned: there are no repeating patterns and no ending in sight. The discovery of the so-called irrational numbers like Pi was so disturbing, legend has it, that one member of the Pythagorian cult, Hippassus, was drowned at sea for divulging their existence. A century later, the philosopher Zeno brought infinity into the open with a series of paradoxes: situations that are true, but strongly counter-intuitive. In this modern update of one of Zeno's paradoxes, say you have arrived at an intersection. But you are only allowed to cross the street in increments of half the distance to the other side. So to cross this finite distance, you must take an infinite number of steps. In math today, it's a given that you can subdivide any length an infinite number of times, or find an infinity of points along a line. What made the idea of infinity so troubling to the Greeks is that it clashed with their goal of using numbers to explain the workings of the real world. To the philosopher Aristotle, a century after Zeno, infinity evoked the formless chaos from which the world was thought to have emerged: a primordial state with no natural laws or limits, devoid of all form and content. But if the universe is finite, what would happen if a warrior traveled to the edge and tossed a spear? Where would it go? It would not fly off on an infinite journey, Aristotle said. Rather, it would join the motion of the stars in a crystalline sphere that encircled the Earth. To preserve the idea of a limited universe, Aristotle would craft an historic distinction. On the one hand, Aristotle pointed to the irrational numbers such as Pi. Each new calculation results in an additional digit, but the final, final number in the string can never be specified. So Aristotle called it potentially infinite. Then there's the actually infinite, like the total number of points or subdivisions along a line. It's literally uncountable. Aristotle reserved the status of actually infinite for the so-called prime mover that created the world and is beyond our capacity to understand. This became the basis for what's called the Cosmological, or First Cause, argument for the existence of God. #universedocumentary #spacedocumentary #Universe

How the Universe Works - The Search For a Second Earth

The Search For a Second Earth by The Science Channel. Buy How the Universe Works series on Discovery Store:

➡ American DocStation facebook page:


⚠ Video information:
Serie: How the Universe Works: Season 3
Episode: 9
Network: Discovery Channel, The Science Channel
Narrator: Mike Rowe
Release date: 2014
Genre: Documentary

⚠ Video settings:
Dimension: 1280x720
Bitrate: 3500
FPS: 30
Audio: 160/48kHz

➡ American DocStation facebook group:


➡ The Science Channel official website:


➡ Other links:


This video is meant for entertainment and educational purposes. The Science Channel/Discovery Channel is the developer and publisher of this documentary for the purpose of copyright. All rights reserved.

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