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ITT 2016 - Kevlin Henney - Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of Many Programmers

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ITT 2016 - Kevlin Henney - Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of Many Programmers

Habits help you manage the complexity of code. You apply existing skill and knowledge automatically to the detail while focusing on the bigger picture. But because you acquire habits largely by imitation, and rarely question them, how do you know your habits are effective? Many of the habits that programmers have for naming, formatting, commenting and unit testing do not stand up as rational and practical on closer inspection. Kevlin Henney examines seven coding habits that are not as effective as programmers believe, and to suggest alternatives.

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???? DevTernity 2016: Kevlin Henney - Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of Many Programmers

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Habits help you manage the complexity of code. You apply existing skill and knowledge automatically to the detail while focusing on the bigger picture. But because you acquire habits largely by imitation, and rarely question them, how do you know your habits are effective? Many of the habits that programmers have for naming, formatting, commenting and unit testing do not stand up as rational and practical on closer inspection. This talk examines seven coding habits that are not as effective as programmers believe, and suggests alternatives.
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Seven ineffective coding habits of many programmers - Kevlin Henney

Breakout session from DevWeek 2014
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18 ITT 2016 Kevlin Henney Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of Many Programmers YouTube Google

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BUILD STUFF'14: Kevlin Henney - Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of Many Programmers

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant and trainer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for various magazines and sites, including Better Software, The Register, Application Development Advisor, Java Report and the C/C++ Users Journal. Kevlin is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series. He is also editor of the 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know site and book.

Habits help you manage the complexity of code. You apply existing skill and knowledge automatically to the detail while focusing on the bigger picture. But because you acquire habits largely by imitation, and rarely question them, how do you know your habits are effective? Many of the habits and conventions programmers have for naming, formatting, commenting and unit testing do not stand up as rational and practical on closer inspection.

This session examined seven coding habits that are not as effective as many programmers — whether working with Java, .NET, native or scripting languages — might believe, and suggested alternatives.

Seven ineffective coding habits of many programmers Kevlin Henney

Habits help you manage the complexity of code. You apply existing skill and knowledge automatically to the detail while focusing on the bigger picture. But because you acquire habits largely.

Habits help you manage the complexity of code. You apply existing skill and knowledge automatically to the detail while focusing on the bigger picture. But because you acquire habits largely.

Breakout session from DevWeek 2017

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant and trainer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for various magazines.

code::dive 2016 conference – Kevlin Henney – Clean Coders Hate (…) When You Use These (…) Tricks

Lecture was held on code::dive conference on November 15-16, 2016, Wrocław, Poland

GOTO 2017 • Code as Risk • Kevlin Henney

This presentation was recorded at GOTO Amsterdam 2017. #GOTOcon #GOTOams


Kevlin Henney - Independent Consultant, Speaker, Writer & Trainer

ABSTRACT
What is risk? Many people aren't sure, but it's not just uncertainty: risk is exposure to uncertainty.
Instead of just plastering over the cracks, security should also involve reducing the size and number of cracks, reducing the opportunities for cracks to appear, reducing the class of errors and [...]

Download slides and read the full abstract here:





#CodeAsRisk #Security #Encryption

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Get Kata - Kevlin Henney

Programmers use coding katas to kick the tyres of their programming languages, paradigms and practices. Typically anchored in a TDD cycle, katas are simple problems that give programmers the opportunity to exercise deliberate practice and explore different approaches, whether programming style, pair programming or test-first programming.

But the simplicity can be deceptive, with many programmers tiring of these katas too soon, missing out on some of the more mind-bending and paradigm-expanding opportunities on offer.

This session will pick on a couple of katas and dig deeper into TDD, lambdas, language(s), (dys)functional programming and Alcubierre drive. It will present code in a variety of languages, highlight the weaknesses of some common mantras, play around with ideas - and blend code, humour and general nerdiness to be both an enjoyable and educational session.

Kevlin's slides:

Foo Café is a meeting place for people with an interest in software development and IT. 




Here, user groups and partner companies find the perfect atmosphere for sharing knowledge and develop competence. 




Foo Café is open for everyone and is free to attend. To make an event at Foo Café, you have to become a partner company with us or you can run a user group with an in-depth technical focus.




We welcome companies with sponsor challenges.




We are currently present in Stockholm and Malmö and have made over 2048 tech events since the start in 2012. 




At Foo Café there’s an event going on everyday, year round.

???? DevTernity 2019: Kevlin Henney - Lean Code

Lean has been applied as a toolkit to fine-tune development processes and organisational workflow, but what does it mean when we apply the practices to the detail of the code, the practices used to develop it and the people who develop it? What does Lean Code and its creation look like? There is a need to move beyond often separated worlds of software craft and agile development, to properly embrace code in its detail, but to also connect it more completely to the flow of business and the intelligence of people around it. To move beyond simple exhortations of clean code to something more human. This talk offers a fresh look at Lean principles and practices from the perspective of the code and the coder, rather than the usual scale of the organisation and the development process.
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Beauty in Code 2019, 3 of 6 — Kevlin Henney: What Do You Mean?

Beauty in Code 2019 was a single-track full day IT-conference organized by Living IT, featuring six amazing speakers from three continents. It was hosted at the Malmö Live conference center on March 2, 2019.

Session 3 of 6 by Kevlin Henney (@KevlinHenney)
What Do You Mean?
It's just semantics. How many conversations about philosophy, politics and programming are derailed by this thought-stopping comment? Semantics is all about meaning.
If there is one thing we struggle with and need to get better at, it is the search for and clarification of meaning. The world in which a software system lives is filled with meaning.
The structure, concepts and names that inform the code, its changes and the mental models held by developers are expressions of meaning.
The very act of development is an exercise in meaning — its discovery, its formulation, its communication.
Paradigms, processes and practices are anchored in different ways of thinking about and arriving at meaning.
But just because we are immersed in concepts of meaning from an early age, and just because the daily work of software development is about wrangling meaning, and just because it's just semantics, that doesn't mean we're necessarily good at it.
It takes effort and insight. Let's talk about what we mean.

Programming with GUTs by Kevlin Henney

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant and trainer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for various magazines and web sites, including Better Software, The Register, Java Report and the C/C++ Users Journal. Kevlin is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series. He is also editor of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know.

Kevlin Henney Lean Code

Kevlin Henney Lean Code

GOTO 2013 • Worse Is Better, for Better or for Worse • Kevlin Henney

This presentation was recorded at GOTO Aarhus 2013


Kevlin Henney - Patterns, Programming, Practice and Process

ABSTRACT
Over two decades ago, Richard P Gabriel proposed the thesis of Worse Is Better to explain why some things that are designed to be pure and perfect are eclipsed by solutions that are seemingly limited and incomplete. This is not simply the observation that things that should be better are not, but that some solutions that were not designed to be the best were nonetheless effective and were the better option. We find many examples of this in software development, some more provocative and surprising than others. In this talk we revisit the original premise and question in the context of product development and user experience, challenging some common ideas of what delights the user, the customer and the market and what should (or should not) be simple in a product.



Programming with GUTs - Kevlin Henney

Breakout session from DevWeek 2015


DevWeek is the UK’s leading conference for professional software developers, architects and analysts. With insights on the latest technologies, best practice and frameworks from industry-leading experts, plus hands-on workshop sessions, DevWeek is your chance to sharpen your skills - and ensure every member of your team is up to date.

Please visit for information on the latest event.

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DevWeek is part of DevWeek Events, a series of software development conferences and workshops, including DevWeek's sister conference 'Software Architect' ( brought to you by Publicis UK.

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Get Kata - Kevlin Henney

Coding katas are a way that programmers can kick the tires of their programming languages, paradigms and practices. Conventionally anchored in a TDD cycle, katas are typically simple problems that give programmers the opportunity to exercise deliberate practice and explore different approaches, whether programming style, pair programming or test-first programming.

But the simplicity can be deceptive, with many programmers tiring of these katas too soon, missing out on some of the more mind-bending and paradigm-expanding opportunities on offer.

This session will pick on a handful of katas and dig deeper into TDD, software craftsmanship, lambdas, language(s), (dys)functional programming and Alcubierre drive.

For more engineering updates and insights:

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Kevlin Henney - Worse Is Better, for Better or for Worse

From #Vilnius to #Mallorca! BUILD STUFF is going to celebrate summer! An amazing weekend on APRIL 29-30, 2017 – MALLORCA, SPAIN will take you out of the office into a seaside event full of professional lectures, technical sessions, beach games, umbrella drinks, and wonderful sunset. #buildstuffes #beachconference #sun #code

Kevlin is an independent consultant and trainer based in the UK. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for various magazines and web sites, including Better Software, The Register, Java Report and the C/C++ Users Journal. Kevlin is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series. He is also editor of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know.

Declarative Thinking, Declarative Practice by Kevlin Henney

Do this, do that. Coding from assembler to shell scripting, from the mainstream languages of the last century to the mainstream languages now, is dominated by an imperative style. From how we teach variables — they vary, right? — to how we talk about databases, we are constantly looking at state as a thing to be changed and programming languages are structured in terms of the mechanics of change — assignment, loops and how code can be threaded (cautiously) with concurrency.

Functional programming, mark-up languages, schemas, persistent data structures and more are all based around a more declarative approach to code, where instead of reasoning in terms of who does what to whom and what the consequences are, relationships and uses are described, and the flow of execution follows from how functions, data and other structures are composed. This talk will look at the differences between imperative and declarative approaches, offering lessons, habits and techniques that are applicable from requirements through to code and tests in Java and other languages.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer and trainer. His software development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He has been a columnist for various magazines and websites and has contributed to both open- and closed-source software. He is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series, and editor of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know.

[TDC-8712]

The Rule of Three by Kevlin Henney

The Rule of Three
Kevlin Henney
@KevlinHenney

The three-act play, the given–when–then BDD triptych, the three steps of the Feynman problem solving algorithm... a surprising number of things appear to come in threes. This talk walks through — and has some fun with — a number of triples that affect and are found in software development.



Giving code a good name Kevlin Henney

Breakout session from DevWeek 2017 DevWeek is the UKs leading conference for professional software developers, architects and analysts. With insights on the latest technolog.

This presentation was recorded at GOTO Amsterdam 2017 Kevlin Henney - Independent Consultant, Speaker, Writer vesves Trainer ABSTRACT What is risk? Many people arent sure, but.

Habits help you manage the complexity of code. You apply existing skill and knowledge automatically to the detail while focusing on the bigger picture. But because you acquire habits largely.

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