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In Da Club - Membranes & Transport: Crash Course Biology #5

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In Da Club - Membranes & Transport: Crash Course Biology #5

Hank describes how cells regulate their contents and communicate with one another via mechanisms within the cell membrane.

Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD!

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Concert music used with permission from Chameleon Circuit.
This video uses sounds from Freesound.org: a list of these sounds can be found in the Google document here, along with the citations for this video:

Table of Contents time codes:
1) Passive Transport - 1:17
2) Diffusion - 1:25
3) Osmosis - 2:12
4) Channel Proteins- 4:37
5) Active Transport - 4:58
6) ATP - 5:37
7) Transport Proteins - 6:19
8) Biolography - 6:37
9) Vesicular Transport - 9:02
10) Exocytosis - 9:21
11) Endocytosis - 9:50
12) Phagocytosis - 9:57
13) Pinocytosis - 10:29
14) Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis - 10:48

TAGS: crashcourse, hank green, biology, chemistry, cell, cell membrane, selective permeability, selectively permeable, active transport, passive transport, solution, concentration, concentration gradient, atp, adenosine tri-phosphate, jens christian skou, vesicular transport, phagocytosis, endocytosis Support CrashCourse on Patreon:
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Eukaryopolis - The City of Animal Cells: Crash Course Biology #4

Hank tells us about the city of Eukaryopolis - the animal cell that is responsible for all the cool things that happen in our bodies.

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More info. on the structures described in this video linked to in the Google Document here:

Table of Contents time codes
1) Robert Hooke 1:59
2) Cilia/Flagella 2:52
3) Cell Membrane 3:32
4) Cytoplasm/Cytoskeleton/Centrosomes 3:58
5) Endoplasmic Reticulum 4:41
6) Ribosomes 5:45
7) Golgi Apparatus 6:00
8) Lysosomes 6:47
9) Nucleus 7:06
10) Mitochondria 9:14

TAGS: crashcourse, biology, animal cells, cell membrane, eukaryote, eukaryotic, organelle, organ, tissue, muscle, nerve, animalia, robert hooke, cilia, flagella, microtubules, cytoplasm, ctyoskeleton, centrosome, nucleus, nucleoplasm, nucleolus, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosome, amino acid, polypeptide, golgi apparatus, golgi, lysosomes, DNA, chromatin, rRNA, mRNA, mitochondria Support CrashCourse on Patreon:
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Transport in Cells: Diffusion and Osmosis | Cells | Biology | FuseSchool

In this video we are going to discover how cells take in useful substances and remove waste using three methods of transportation: diffusion, osmosis and then in the second part we will look at active transport.

The exchange of materials occurs between cells and their environment, across the cell membrane. To make this exchange as efficient as possible, some organisms have evolved specialised exchange surfaces like the alveoli in the lungs, or root hairs in plants or the nephrons in kidneys.

Depending upon what is being exchanged and which direction along the concentration gradient things are travelling will determine whether diffusion, osmosis or active transport will be used.

Diffusion is the process in which particles spread out from each other. They move from high concentration to an area of low concentration,down the concentration gradient until they are evenly distributed.

Osmosis is very similar to diffusion but just for water. It is the movement of water into or out of a cell. Again, it is the movement from a dilute solution (so high concentration of water molecules) down the concentration gradient to a more concentrated solution - so low concentration of water molecules. The water molecules move across a partially permeable membrane.

Watch part 2 to learn about active transport.

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This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: info@fuseschool.org
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Osmosis and Water Potential (Updated)

Explore the process of osmosis in this updated Amoeba Sisters video! Video features real life examples of osmosis, important vocab, and introduces concept of water potential and turgor pressure in plant cells. Expand details for table of contents. We have an Unlectured resource on this topic!

Contents:
0:59 Osmosis Definition
4:20 Osmosis in Animal Cells Example
7:00 Osmosis in Plant Cells Example
7:30 Water Potential
9:22 Create Something Prompt!

We are so appreciative of feedback we receive as it helps us continue to improve. In this video, we say the word molecules several times. Chemically speaking---the term molecule may be ok when referring to water but not salt as we did in 2:54. Salt is formed by ionic bonds [not molecular (covalent) bonds like you would see in water].

Vocabulary includes solute, solvent, passive transport, hypertonic, hypotonic, isotonic, equilibrium, water potential, pressure potential, turgor pressure, and solute potential.

NOTE: We defined water potential as potential energy in water (supported in reference: but in the video, we do note that this definition can be expanded upon or worded in many different ways. In bio specifically, water potential tends to be used to describe where water travels based on solute potential and pressure potential.

Reference: OpenStax Biology for AP Courses, Biology for AP® Courses. OpenStax CNX. Apr 9, 2018

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The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching biology at the high school level. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit:


We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook:

We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines and YouTube's policy center We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language.

Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library

We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages, and we are thankful for those that contribute different languages! YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are not affiliated with any of the translated subtitle credits that YouTube may place below. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
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Intro to Cell Signaling

Explore cell signaling with the Amoeba Sisters! This introductory video describes vocabulary such as ligand and receptor. It includes the stages of cell signaling (reception, transduction, and response) and different types of signaling including autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine. This is just an introduction to a series on signaling that we hope to expand on in the future!

Factual References:

OpenStax, Biology. OpenStax CNX. Jun 1, 2018

Reece, J. B., & Campbell, N. A. (2011). Campbell biology. Boston: Benjamin Cummings / Pearson.

Further Reading Suggestion:
Want to learn more about autocrine signaling in cancer cells?


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Our Resources:
Biology Playlist:
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Handouts:
Comics:
Unlectured Series:

Connect with us!
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:
Tumblr:
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Visit our Redbubble store at

The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching biology at the high school level. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit:


We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook:

Our intro music designed and performed by Jeremiah Cheshire.

End music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library

We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines and YouTube's policy center We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language.

We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages, and we are thankful for those that contribute different languages! YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are not affiliated with any of the translated subtitle credits that YouTube may place below. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.

Biology: Cell Transport

How do things move across the cell membrane, either in or out? This animation shows two broad categories of how things pass into or out of a cell: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport is automatic; no input of energy is required. For example, diffusion is a passive process in which particles move either into or out of the cell from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration.

Active transport, on the other hand, is when particles move from an area of lower concentration to an area of higher concentration. Because particles are moving against the concentration gradient, energy is required.

After viewing this video, the viewer will be able to:
• List the two broad categories of cell transport
• Describe the difference between active and passive transport.

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Watch other Nucleus Biology videos:
- Cell Structure:
- Controlled Experiments:
- Independent vs. Dependent Variables:

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Learn more about the company that created this video:

In da club - membranes and transport | Crash Course biology | Khan Academy

Hank describes how cells regulate their contents and communicate with one another via mechanisms within the cell membrane. Created by Crash Course.

View the next lesson:

Missed the previous lesson?

Eukaryopolis - The city of animal cells | Crash Course biology| Khan Academy

Hank tells us about the city of Eukaryopolis - the animal cell that is responsible for all the cool things that happen in our bodies. Created by Crash Course.

Watch the next lesson:

Missed the previous lesson?

About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything.

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Diffusion

Explore how substances travel in diffusion with the Amoeba Sisters! This video uses a real life example and mentions concentration gradients, passive transport, facilitated diffusion, and explains why diffusion is critical for all organisms. In addition, this video discusses factors that can affect the rate of diffusion.

Time-stamped Table of Contents:
0:57 Relating intro event to diffusion
1:45 Diffusion explained
2:57 Molecules still move at equilibrium!
3:33 Diffusion is passive transport
3:45 Facilitated diffusion
4:22 Some factors that can affect rate of diffusion
6:35 Why care about diffusion?

Factual Reference:
OpenStax Biology 2nd Edition, Biology 2e. OpenStax CNX. Aug 19, 2019

****Further Reading Suggestions****
-Learn more about the fish disease Ich?
-We mention that you can read more about how raising the temperature can increase the rate of diffusion. Here's an expanded explanation from Biology Stax.
-Learn more about diffusion's role in the lungs:

The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching biology at the high school level. Learn more about our videos here:

Support Us?

Our Resources:
Biology Playlist:
GIFs:
Handouts:
Comics:
Unlectured Series:

Connect with us!
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:
Tumblr:
Pinterest:
Instagram:

Visit our Redbubble store at

Our intro music designed and performed by Jeremiah Cheshire.

End music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library

We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines In addition, we also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language.

We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages, and we are thankful for those that contribute different languages! YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are not affiliated with any of the translated subtitle credits that YouTube may place below. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.

DNA Structure and Replication: Crash Course Biology #10

Hank introduces us to that wondrous molecule deoxyribonucleic acid - also known as DNA - and explains how it replicates itself in our cells.

Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD!

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References for this episode can be found in the Google document here:

1:41 link to Biological Molecules

Table of Contents:
1) Nucleic Acids 1:30
2) DNA
-A) Polymers 1:53
-B) Three Ingredients 2:12
-C) Base Pairs 3:45
-D) Base Sequences 4:13
3) Pop Quiz 5:07
4) RNA 5:36
-A) Three Differences from DNA 5:43
5) Biolography 6:16
6) Replication 8:49
-A) Helicase and Unzipping 9:22
-B) Leading Strand 9:38
-C) DNA Polymerase 10:08
-D) RNA Primase 10:24
-E) Lagging Strand 10:46
-F) Okazaki Fragments 11:07
-F) DNA Ligase 11:47

DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid, chromosome, nucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, RNA, polymer, nucleotide, double helix, nucleotide base, base pair, base sequence, friedrich miescher, rosalind franklin, replication, helicase, leading strand, lagging strand, rna primase, dna polymerase, okazaki fragment Support CrashCourse on Patreon:
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DNA, Hot Pockets, & The Longest Word Ever: Crash Course Biology #11

Hank imagines himself breaking into the Hot Pockets factory to steal their secret recipes and instruction manuals in order to help us understand how the processes known as DNA transcription and translation allow our cells to build proteins.

Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD!

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Table of Contents:
1) Transcription 2:12
A) Transcription Unit 3:00
B) Promoter 3:10
C) TATA Box 3:32
D) RNA Polymerase 4:12
E) mRNA 4:15
F) Termination signal 5:21
G) 5' Cap & Poly-A Tail 5:34
2) RNA Splicing 6:08
A) SNuRPs & Spliceosome 6:26
B) Exons & Introns 6:56
3) Translation 7:28
A) mRNA & tRNA 8:01
B) Triplet Codons & Anticodons 8:39
4) Folding & Protein Structure 10:51
A) Primary Structure 11:11
B) Secondary Structure 11:23
C) Tertiary Structure 11:58
D) Quaternary Structure 12:44


Links to episodes referenced in the video:
DNA structure episode:
Animal cells episode:
Fold-it SciShow episode:

REFERENCES for this video can be found in the Google document here:

This video contains the following sounds from Freesound.org:
IMPresora.wav by melack
swishes.wav by pogotron

tags: crashcourse, science, biology, DNA, titin, hot pocket, transcription, translation, gene, RNA, enzyme, transcription unit, adenine, thymine, cytosine, guanine, TATA box, DNA strand, mRNA, messenger RNA, RNA polymerase, uracil, termination signal, RNA splicing, SNuRPs, spliceosome, exons, introns, ribosome, tRNA, transfer RNA, amino acid, nitrogenous base, codon, anticodon, polypeptide chain, folding, helix, pleated sheets, protein biosynthesis, gene expression Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Plant Cells: Crash Course Biology #6

Hank describes why plants are so freaking amazing - discussing their evolution, and how their cells are both similar to & different from animal cells.

Crash Course Biology now available on DVD!

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This video uses sounds from Freesound.org, a list of which can be found, along with the CITATIONS for this video, in the Google Document here:

Table of Contents annotations:

1. Re-watch the whole video 0:00
2. Introduction 0:00
3. Plant Evolution 0:56
4. Eukaryotic vs. Prokaryotic Cells 2:33
5. Cellulose and Lignin 3:58
6. Plastids and Chloroplasts 7:05
7. Central Vacuole 8:10

TAGS: crashcourse, biology, hank green, plants, plantae, chemistry, energy, learn, course, lycophyte, scale tree, carboniferous, angiosperm, eukaryotic, nucleus, prokaryotic, membrane, cytoplasm, organelle, cellulose, lignin, energy, photosynthesis, plastid, chloroplast, central vacuole, turgor pressure Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Exocytosis | Membranes and transport | Biology | Khan Academy

Introduction to exocytosis!

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Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course.

About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content.

For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything

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Population Genetics: When Darwin Met Mendel - Crash Course Biology #18

Hank talks about population genetics, which helps to explain the evolution of populations over time by combing the principles of Mendel and Darwin, and by means of the Hardy-Weinberg equation.

Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD!

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References for this episode can be found in the Google document here:

Table of Contents:

1. Population Genetics 1:05
2. Population 1:14
3. Allele Frequency 1:41
4. 5 Factors 1:58
a) Natural Selection 2:12
b) Natural Selection/Random Mating 2:27
c) Mutation 3:18
d) Genetic Drift 3:49
e) Gene Flow 4:05

5. Hardy-Weinberg Principle 4:45
6. Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium 5:15
7. Hardy-Weinberg Equation 6:18

gregor mendel, heredity, genetics, charles darwin, natural selection, evolution, offspring, population genetics, species, population, generation, allele frequency, allele, selective pressure, sexual selection, non-random mating, preferred traits, fitness, mutation, DNA, genetic drift, chance, gene flow, immigration, emigration, godfrey hardy, wilhelm weinberg, hardy-weinberg equation, hardy-weinberg equilibrium, phenotype, genotype, earwax, mendelian trait, homozygous, heterozygous, evolutionary biology

This video contains the following sound from Freesound.org:

LucasGonze-HomestyleMandolin-17.aiff by lucasgonze Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Cell Membranes

015 - Cell Membranes

Paul Andersen explains how cells are selectively permeable with the help of their cell membrane. The main constituents of the cell membrane, including cholesterol, glycolipids, glycoproteins, phospholipids, and proteins are included. The fluid mosaic model is also illustrated. The cell wall in plants, bacteria, and fungi is also discussed.

Intro Music Atribution
Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav
Artist: CosmicD
Link to sound:
Creative Commons Atribution License
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Vascular Plants = Winning! - Crash Course Biology #37

Hank introduces us to one of the most diverse and important families in the tree of life - the vascular plants. These plants have found tremendous success and the their secret is also their defining trait: conductive tissues that can take food and water from one part of a plant to another part. Though it sounds simple, the ability to move nutrients and water from one part of an organism to another was a evolutionary breakthrough for vascular plants, allowing them to grow exponentially larger, store food for lean times, and develop features that allowed them to spread farther and faster. Plants dominated the earth long before animals even showed up, and even today hold the world records for the largest, most massive, and oldest organisms on the planet.

Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD!

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Table of Contents
1) 3 Tissue Types 02:37
2) Primary Growth 03:04
3) Secondary Growth 03:28
4) Dermal Tissue 04:47
a) Epidermis 04:54
5) Parenchyma Cells 05:39
6) Vascular Tissue 05:58
7) Xylem 05:58
8) Collenchyma 07:10
9) Sclerenchyma 07:35
10) Ground Tissue 08:25
a) Mesophyll 08:17
b) Photosynthesis 08:47
11) Phloem 09:54

References





crashcourse, biology, vascular plant, plant, successful, diversity, diverse, conductive tissue, evolution, growth, largest, most massive, oldest, dermal tissue, vascular tissue, ground tissue, photosynthesis, sprout, germination, primary growth, herbaceous, secondary growth, woody tissue, organ, root, stem, meristem, leaf, epidermis, cuticle, trichomes, root hairs, parenchyma, cortex, xylem, evapotranspiration, collenchyma, sclerenchyma, lignin, mesophyll, chloroplasts, stomata, phloem, sieve cells, sieve-tube elements, internal pressure, diffusion Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Natural Selection - Crash Course Biology #14

Hank guides us through the process of natural selection, the key mechanism of evolution.

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Table of Contents:
1) Natural Selection 1:27
2) Adaptation 2:56
3) Fitness 3:36
4) Four Principals 3:54
a. Variations 4:01
b. Heritability 4:17
c. The Struggle for Existence 4:25
d. Survival and Reproductive Rates 5:00
5) Biolography 5:59
6) Modes of Selection 7:40
a. Directional Selection 8:17
b. Stabilizing Selection 8:56
c. Disruptive Selection 9:27
7) Sexual Selection 10:22
8) Artificial Selection 11:24

References for this episode can be found in the Google document here:

This video uses the following sounds from Freesound.org:
20071104.forest.04.binaural.mp3 by dobroide
ForestBirds.wav by HerbertBoland

crashcourse, science, biology, natural selection, genetics, peppered moth, inherited traits, population genetics, charles darwin, darwin, on the origin of species, evolution, adaptation, galapagos finches, fitness, variation, phenotype, heritable, malthus, survival rate, reproductive rate, crossbreeding, inbreeding, genotype, directional selection, stabilizing selection, disruptive selection, selective pressures, sexual selection, artificial selection, selective breeding Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Old & Odd: Archaea, Bacteria & Protists - CrashCourse Biology #35

Hank veers away from human anatomy to teach us about the (mostly) single-celled organisms that make up two of the three taxonomic domains of life, and one of the four kingdoms: Archaea, Bacteria, and Protists. They are by far the most abundant organisms on Earth, and are our oldest, oddest relatives.

Crash Course World History is now available on DVD!

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References for this episode can be found in the Google document here:

Table of Contents
1) Archaea 03:23
a) Methanogens 04:02
b) Extremophiles 04:24

2) Bacteria 05:24:2
3) Gram Positive 06:50
a) Proteobacteria 07:15
b) Cyanobacteria 07:30
c) Spirochetes 07:42
d) Chlamydias 07:52

4) Protists 08:12
a) Protozoa 09:03
b) Algae 09:54
c) Slime Molds 11:13

crash course, biology, archaea, bacteria, protists, unicellular, life, origin, evolution, evolve, eukaryotic, prokaryotic, nucleus, cell membrane, cytoplasm, ribosome, DNA, chromosome, plasmid, extremophile, methanogen, hydrothermal vent, halophile, parasitic, antibiotic, immune system, horizontal gene transfer, diverse, gram staining, gram positive, proteobacteria, cyanobacteria, spirochete, chlamydia, protozoa, algae, dog vomit, slime mold, heterotrophic, flagella, cilia, amoeba, photosynthesis, diatom, sailor's eyeball, bubble algae, seaweed, green, red, brown Support CrashCourse on Patreon:

Transport 2- Cell membrane

Part 2 in an 8 part lecture on TRANSPORT & OSMOSIS in a flipped Human Physiology course taught by Wendy Riggs. CC-BY. Watch the whole lecture (all 8 videos) by going to the PLAYLIST:

Receptors: Signal Transduction and Phosphorylation Cascade

Did you know that cells can talk to one another? One cell can send a molecule over to another cell, and a receptor protein in the cell membrane will receive it, just like molecular walkie-talkies. Check it out!

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ProfessorDaveExplains@gmail.com





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