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Inside the black hole image that made history | Sheperd Doeleman

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Inside the black hole image that made history | Sheperd Doeleman

At the center of a galaxy more than 55 million light-years away, there's a supermassive black hole with the mass of several billion suns. And now, for the first time ever, we can see it. Astrophysicist Sheperd Doeleman, head of the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, speaks with TED's Chris Anderson about the iconic, first-ever image of a black hole -- and the epic, worldwide effort involved in capturing it.

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Shep Doeleman Photographs a Black Hole

A black hole is an object so dense that not even light can escape its gravitational pull. So how could you ever take a picture of one? It seemed impossible, but on April 10th, 2019, scientists from the Event Horizon Telescope, led by astronomer Shep Doeleman, announced that they'd done just that. Their image of the photons circling a supermassive black hole in the galaxy Messier 87 will revolutionize our understanding of the universe—and move the dial on what's considered impossible.

CREDITS:
- Produced by Brandon Royal and Mandi Gorenstein
- Edited by Josh Zimmerman
- Music by APM

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First Image of a Black Hole!

The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration observed the supermassive black hole at the center of M87, finding the dark central shadow in accordance with General Relativity, further demonstrating the power of this 100 year-old theory.

To understand more about why the shadows look the way they do, check out:

I will continue updating this description with more links.

Event Horizon Telescope collaboration:

Animations and simulations with English text:
L. R. Weih & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


Video of observation of M87 courtesy of:
C. M. Fromm, Y. Mizuno & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


Video of observation of SgrA* courtesy of
C. M. Fromm, Y. Mizuno & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)
Z. Younsi (University College London)


Video of telescopes in the array 2017:
C. M. Fromm & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


Animations and simulations (no text):
L. R. Weih & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


Special thanks to Patreon supporters:
Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Ron Neal, Stan Presolski, Terrance Shepherd, Penward Rhyme

Scale animation by Maria Raykova
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2020 Breakthrough Prize Winner Shep Doeleman—How EHT Imaged a Black Hole

Congratulations to Shep Doeleman and the the Event Horizon Telescope team, winners of the 2020 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics! At the 2019 World Science Festival, Shep presented the methods used by the EHT team to produce the first-ever photograph of a black hole. The image, released on April 10th, 2019, confirms (at least for the moment) Einstein’s theories at the boundary of a supermassive black hole, opening a new window into the study of these mysterious objects.

This program is part of the Big Ideas Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation.

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How to take a picture of a black hole | Katie Bouman

At the heart of the Milky Way, there's a supermassive black hole that feeds off a spinning disk of hot gas, sucking up anything that ventures too close -- even light. We can't see it, but its event horizon casts a shadow, and an image of that shadow could help answer some important questions about the universe. Scientists used to think that making such an image would require a telescope the size of Earth -- until Katie Bouman and a team of astronomers came up with a clever alternative. Bouman explains how we can take a picture of the ultimate dark using the Event Horizon Telescope.

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

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What Happens If 1 mm Black Hole Appears On Earth?

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How Close Can a Black Hole Be to Earth?

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Scientists reveal first photo of a black hole

An international team of scientists used the Event Horizon Telescope to obtain the first image of a black hole. They say the image of the center of the galaxy M87 shows a bright ring formed as light bends in the intense gravity around a black hole that is 6.5 billion times more massive than the sun. Watch the announcement.

What's Inside A Black Hole? - Black Holes Explained - Origin of the Solar System

As Hawking says, the black holes would evaporate. During evaporation, the black hole emits energy in the form of the positive particles that escape. ... So, yes, black holes do die, and they do so when the theories of the extremely large come together with the theories of the very small.

Doomsday: 10 Ways the World Will End: PLANET DESTROYING BLACK HOLE (Season 1) | History

Scientists believe millions of Black Holes exist in our galaxy and have the capability to destroy everything in its path. What would happen if a black hole sucked Earth into its deadly vortex? Find out in this clip from Season 1, Black Hole. #Doomsday
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HISTORY® is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, premium documentaries, and scripted event programming..
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April 10th, 2019 - Claims of a Black Hole Image: the Day Astrophysics Died

The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration, First M87 Event Horizon Telescope Results.
I. The Shadow of the Supermassive Black Hole
The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 875, Number 1, L1(17pp)


The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration, First M87 Event Horizon Telescope Results.
II.Array and Instrumentation
The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 875, Number 1, L2(28pp)


The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration, First M87 Event Horizon Telescope Results.
III.Data Processing and Calibration
The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 875, Number 1, L3(32pp)


The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration, First M87 Event Horizon Telescope Results.
IV.Imaging the Central Supermassive Black Hole
The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 875, Number 1, L4(52pp)


The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration, First M87 Event Horizon Telescope Results.
V.Physical Origin of the Asymmetric Ring
The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 875, Number 1, L2(31pp)


The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration, First M87 Event Horizon Telescope Results.
VI.The Shadow and Mass of the Central Black Hole
The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 875, Number 1, L2(44pp)


It Took Half a Ton of Hard Drives to Store the Black Hole Image Data
(story by Ryan Whitwam on April 11, 2019 published in Extreme Tech)


P.M. Robitaille, WMAP: A Radiological Analysis
Progress in Physics 2007, vol. 1, 3-18.


R.J.R. Knowles and J.A. Markisz, Quality Assurance and Image Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Little, Brown, and Company, Boston, MA, 1988

M.J. Firbank, R.M. Harrison, E.D. Williams, A. Coulthard,
Quality assurance for MRI: practical experience.
Br J Radiol. 2000 Apr;73(868):376-83.


C.C. Chen, Y.L. Wan, Y.Y. Wai, and H.-L. Liu,
Quality Assurance of Clinical MRI Scanners Using ACR MRI Phantom: Preliminary Results
J Digit Imaging. 2004 Dec; 17(4): 279–284.


twitter.com/SkyScholarVideo

Thank you for viewing this video on Sky Scholar! This channel is dedicated to new ideas about the nature of the sun, the stars, thermodynamics, and the microwave background. We will discuss all things astronomy, physics, chemistry, and imaging related! We hope that the combination of facts and special effects will aid in learning even the toughest concepts in astronomy. If you enjoyed this video, please subscribe.

Pierre-Marie Robitaille, Ph.D., was a professor of Radiology at The Ohio State University from 1989-2019, and also held an appointment in the Chemical Physics Program. In 1998, he led the design and assembly of the world’s first Ultra High Field MRI System. Readings from this equipment brought into question fundamental aspects of modern thermal physics, such as Kirchhoff’s Law of thermal emission.

Figures not to scale and used for visualization purposes only.

This channel is educational in nature.

Astronomy links of interest:
Space Weather:
NASA Image and Video Search: images.nasa.gov/
NASA Hubble Satellite: hubblesite.org/
NASA Helioviewer: helioviewer.org/
NASA ADS Scientific Article Search Page: adsabs.harvard.edu/bib_abs.html
National Solar Observatory: nso.edu/
SOHO Satellite: soho.nascom.nasa.gov/
SDO Satellite: sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/
IRIS Satellite:
Hinode, JAXA/NASA:
Daniel K. Inoue Solar Telescope: dkist.nso.edu/
National Solar Observatory GONG: gong.nso.edu/
1 meter Swedish Solar Telescope:

All observational images and videos are credited to NASA unless otherwise specified. Images obtained by the SDO satellite are a courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams. Images obtained by the SOHO satellite are courtesy of SOHO (ESA & NASA).

Link to Professor Robitaille’s papers on Vixra:


Outro Music:
Foria: Break Away

Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Supermassive Giant Black Hole - How the Universe Works

Dark matter does not reflect light or interact with ordinarymatter except through gravity. So when dark matter is swallowed by a black hole,it behaves somewhat differently than normal matter, the new study found. For example, as normal matter falls toward a blackhole, it heats up and radiates light

The First Black Hole Picture Of History 4/10/2019

The first picture of black hole in the history 4/10/2019

:::::The pic is in 4:27::::::

For the first time ever, humanity can gaze at an actual photograph of a supermassive black hole. It’s an achievement that’s taken supercomputers, eight telescopes stationed around the world, hundreds of researchers, and vast amounts of data. The results from this project, called the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), were announced today at joint press conferences live-streamed around the world. In addition to providing a picture that will quickly be incorporated into teaching materials around the world, the results helped to confirm (again) Einstein’s theory of general relativity, and it gave astrophysicists an unprecedented close-up of these enigmatic, dense celestial phenomena.

“Black holes are the most mysterious objects in the Universe,” Sheperd Doeleman, the project director of the Event Horizon Telescope, said at a press conference today before unveiling the image.

The picture shows the black hole at the center of the huge galaxy Messier 87 (M87), which is located about 53 million light-years away from Earth.


The black hole in this galaxy has a mass that the Event Horizon Telescope researchers estimate to be 6 billion times more massive than our Sun. In addition to being gargantuan, M87’s black hole was already intriguing to researchers. In some early pictures of the galaxy, they noticed a massive jet of plasma streaming out from its center. Scientists think that the jet is made of material that never quite made it into the event horizon of the black hole. Instead, their observations suggest that the movement of M87’s black hole (which researchers believe is spinning rapidly) accelerates subatomic particles and sends them shooting out into the universe, a beacon to distant astronomers.


The Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) near Tucson, Arizona, is one of the eight telescopes involved in this discovery. Photo by David Harvey
The Event Horizon Telescope is not a traditional telescope; rather, it refers to a group of eight radio telescopes that are stationed on five continents, which all observed the same areas of space over the course of one week in April 2017.

According to the Event Horizon Telescope, a conventional telescope would have to be approximately the size of Earth in order to take this particular snapshot of the black hole at the center of M87. “This is a picture you would have seen if you had eyes as big as the Earth and were observing in radio,” Dimitrios Psaltis, an Event Horizon Telescope project scientist at the University of Arizona, recently told The Verge. Individually, none of the telescopes measured up. But by coordinating their efforts, the researchers were able to zero in M87, collecting massive amounts of data in the process.


While the observations took just one week in April 2017 to gather, actually sorting through the vast amounts of data took months. Just getting it all into one place was a huge challenge. Writing in Nature News in 2017, Davide Castelvecchi noted that a “typical night will yield about as much data as a year’s worth of experiments at the Large Hadron Collider outside Geneva, Switzerland.” All of that data was recorded onto discs and then physically sent to centralized locations where it was analyzed by a supercomputer for months in order to get the image we see today.

Before this picture was released to the public, the image itself — and the data used to create it — went through one more step: a rigorous peer-review process, vetted by researchers in the field who were not part of the project.

Researchers with the Event Horizon Telescope project had four main scientific goals when they started this project. The first was simple: take a picture of a black hole. Check.

The other three were more complicated. Researchers also wanted to understand more about how black holes grow and what makes material orbiting the black hole eventually fall in. The researchers hope that the answer to that might also explain why the material surrounding Sagittarius A* (the black hole at the center of our own galaxy) is unusually dim for material circling a supermassive black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope also wanted to get a better idea of why supermassive black holes at the center of some galaxies, like elliptical galaxy M87, seemed to help propel massive streams of subatomic particles out of the galaxy and into the broader universe.

Finally, the researchers wanted a chance to check Einstein’s work. The famous scientist’s theory of general relativity is over 100 years old, and it’s held up really well over the past century. He predicted the existence of gravitational waves long before humanity had the means to detect them, and his theory also predicted that the silhouette or “shadow” of a black hole would look circular. So far, so good.
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Birth of a Black Hole 4K

For more 4K space, and more great History and Science than you'll ever watch, check out our sister network...


This SpaceRip classic explores one of the greatest mysteries in modern science: a series of brief but extremely bright flashes of ultra-high energy light coming from somewhere out in space. These gamma ray bursts were first spotted by spy satellites in the 1960s. It took three decades and a revolution in high-energy astronomy for scientists to figure out what they were: black holes at the moment of their birth.

Far out in space, in the center of a seething cosmic maelstrom. Extreme heat. High velocities. Atoms tear, and space literally buckles. Photons fly out across the universe, energized to the limits found in nature. Billions of years later, they enter the detectors of spacecraft stationed above our atmosphere. Our ability to record them is part of a new age of high-energy astronomy, and a new age of insights into nature at its most extreme. What can we learn by witnessing the violent birth of a black hole?

The outer limits of a black hole, call the event horizon, is subject to what Albert Einstein called frame dragging, in which space and time are pulled along on a path that leads into the black hole. As gas, dust, stars or planets fall into the hole, they form into a disk that spirals in with the flow of space time, reaching the speed of light just as it hits the event horizon. The spinning motion of this so-called accretion disk can channel some of the inflowing matter out into a pair of high-energy beams, or jets.

How a jet can form was shown in a supercomputer simulation of a short gamma ray burst. It was based on a 40-millisecond long burst recorded by Swift on May 9, 2005. It took five minutes for the afterglow to fade, but that was enough for astronomers to capture crucial details. It had come from a giant galaxy 2.6 billion light years away, filled with old stars.

Scientists suspected that this was a case of two dead stars falling into a catastrophic embrace. Orbiting each other, they moved ever closer, gradually gaining speed. At the end of the line, they began tearing each other apart, until they finally merged. NASA scientists simulated the final 35 thousandths of a second, when a black hole forms.

Chaos reigns. But the new structure becomes steadily more organized, and a magnetic field takes on the character of a jet. Within less than a second after the black hole is born, it launches a jet of particles to a speed approaching light.

A similar chain of events, in the death of a large star, is responsible for longer gamma ray bursts. Stars resist gravity by generating photons that push outward on their enormous mass. But the weight of a large star's core increases from the accumulation of heavy elements produced in nuclear fusion. In time, its outer layers cannot resist the inward pull... and the star collapses. The crash produces a shock wave that races through the star and obliterates it.

In the largest of these dying stars, known as collapsars or hypernovae, a black hole forms in the collapse. Matter flowing in forms a disk. Charged particles create magnetic fields that twist off this disk, sending a portion out in high-speed jets.

Simulations show that the jet is powerful enough to plow its way through the star. In so doing, it may help trigger the explosion. The birth of a black hole does not simply light up the universe. It is a crucial event in the spread of heavy elements that seed the birth of new solar systems and planets.

But the black hole birth cries that we can now register with a fleet of high-energy telescopes are part of wider response to gravity's convulsive power.

Taking a Photograph of a Black Hole

Shep Doeleman, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Astronomer & Director, Event Horizon Telescope Project

Black holes are the most exotic objects thought to exist in the universe, but no one has ever seen one. In this talk, Dr. Shep Doeleman, astronomer at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, will explore the evidence for black holes, and describe an effort to link radio dishes around the world to form an Earth-sized virtual telescope that can capture the first images of the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way.

Original music by Mark C. Petersen, Loch Ness Productions. Used with permission.

Animations used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
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Michio Kaku - First Black Hole Pictures

Michio Kaku - First Black Hole Pictures
April 15, 2019

Milky Way black hole emits mysterious light flare -- astronomers aren't sure why

Scientists spot a flare of light coming from a black hole in the Milky Way. Syracuse University physics professor Duncan Brown explains to CBSN how the mysterious event may have occurred.

What Would You See Staring At a Black Hole

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What If You Fell Into a Black Hole?

What would the outcome be if you took a leap of faith straight into a black hole? We looked to Einstein and Hawking to ponder the scenario.

Say one day you were exploring space looking for a new planet for humans to inhabit, but came across a black hole and decided – why not check it out? Would you have any chance of survival? How would you get out if at all? Would you find a shortcut to another universe? Watch the video to learn about what would happen if you fell into a black hole.

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Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it, we go nowhere. — Carl Sagan

Why this black hole photo is such a big deal

What it took to collect these 54-million-year-old photons from a supermassive black hole.

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This is an updated version of a video we published in 2016 about the Event Horizon Telescope, an international collaboration to image a black hole for the first time in human history.

On April 10, 2019, the team announced their results: They had successfully imaged the supermassive black hole in the center of the galaxy m87, which is nearly 54 million light-years away from us. They were able to achieve unprecedented resolution using very long baseline interferometry, which combines the observations of multiple radio telescopes across the globe.

The team wanted to find out whether Einstein's Theory of General Relativity holds up in the extreme environment of black holes, and the results do, in fact, seem to be consistent with the predictions. In the future, we may see more and shaper images of black holes as the team targets smaller wavelengths of light and recruits more telescopes. Eventually, they may include an orbiting space telescope.

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