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Journey Through The Universe - HD Documentary

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Journey Through The Universe - HD Documentary


Journey Through The Universe - HD Documentary
Advexon Documentary TV

Journey To The Edge Of The Universe National Geographic, 720p

Egde of Space, A Journey to the edge of the Universe.

A National Geographic Documentary from 2008 in 720p [HD] This is a subject that I really enjoy to watch documentaries of, and I wanted to share this for educational purpose. I think its a extremely interesting subject that can really get your brain working.
The Documentary is of a pretty good quality and I really hope that atleast some people will find this to be of great use to them. And that you might learn something new.

The thumbnail photo used if the same that is used by National Geographic. Its a picture taken with the Hubble Space Telescope and its called: V838 Mon (Light Echo) so it is actually a magnificent real thing.
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Journey to the Edge of the Universe (Sean Pertwee) - Full HD 1080p

National Geographic presents the first accurate non-stop voyage from Earth to the edge of the Universe using a single, unbroken shot through the use of spectacular CGI (Computer-Generated Imagery) technology.

Building on images taken from the Hubble telescope, Journey to the Edge of the Universe explores the science and history behind the distant celestial bodies in the solar system.

This spectacular, epic voyage across the cosmos, takes us from the Earth, past the Moon and our neighboring planets, out of our Solar System, to the nearest stars, nebulae and galaxies and beyond - right to the edge of the Universe itself.

When you finish this video, you will walk away from it with an awareness that you never had before, of the unseen astronomically massive universe that we float around on like a spec of dust in the ocean.

This video takes you on a journey through the universe as if you are watching a Sci Fi adventure. Yet you constantly have to remind yourself that what you're seeing is really out there.

The Edge of The Universe - Documentary HD

PBS NOVA Documentary
One form of the question asks, Could you go somewhere that you could look 'beyond' the universe, the way one might peer beyond a cliff edge or look out a window to see the outside of a building? The answer to that query is probably not.

One reason involves the cosmological principle, said Robert McNees, an associate professor of physics at Loyola University Chicago. The cosmological principle states that the distribution of matter in any part of the universe looks roughly the same as in any other part, regardless what direction you look in; in scientists' terms, the universe is isotropic.

The cosmological principle is, in part, a consequence of the idea that the laws of physics are the same everywhere. There's lots of local variation — stars, galaxies, clusters, etc. — but averaged over big chunks of space, no place is really that different than anywhere else, McNees told Live Science in an email

The implication though, is that there is no edge; there is no place to go where the universe just ends and one could look in some direction and see what's beyond it.

One analogy often used to describe this edgeless universe is the surface of a balloon. An ant on such a surface can walk in any direction and it would look like the surface was unbounded — that is, the ant might come back to where it started but there would be no end to the journey. So even though the surface of a balloon is a finite number of square units, there's no edge to it, no boundary (since you can go forever in any one direction). In addition, there's no center, so there's no preferred point on the balloon's spherical surface.

The universe is a three-dimensional version of the balloon's skin.

Ballooning universe
But how can the universe be expanding if there is no end or edge to it?

Using the balloon analogy again, if one were to add more air to the balloon, the ant would observe other things on the balloon's surface getting farther away. And the greater the distance between the ant and some object, the faster that object would be receding. But no matter where the ant skittered, the speed at which those objects were receding would follow the same relations — if the ant came up with an equation describing how fast the farthest objects were receding, it would work the same way anywhere on the balloon's surface.

However, balloons, when blown up, are expanding into a three-dimensional space. The problem is that this doesn't apply to the universe. By definition, the universe contains everything, so there is no outside. Physicist Stephen Hawking has often said that the whole question makes no sense, because if the universe came from nothing and brought everything into existence, then asking what lies beyond the universe is like asking what is north of the North Pole.
Dr. Katie Mack, a theoretical astrophysicist at the University of Melbourne in Australia, told Live Science that it might be more useful to think of the universe as getting less dense, rather than expanding. That is, the concentration of matter in the universe is decreasing as the universe expands, she said.

That's because galaxies aren't moving away from each other through space — it's space itself that is getting bigger. So any aliens in the galaxies that humans see would all come to the same conclusion that Earthlings do: Everything else is moving away in all directions, and the local galaxy is at rest.
And on top of that, the rate of expansion has not been uniform. For a brief fraction of a second after the Big Bang, there was a period of accelerated expansion called inflation, during which the universe grew at a much faster pace than it is growing now. Whole regions of space will never be observable from Earth for that reason. Mack noted that assuming inflation happened, the universe is actually 1023 times bigger than the 46 billion light-years humans can see. So if there is an edge to the universe, it's so far away Earthlings can't see it, and never will.

An infinite space?
Meanwhile, there's the issue of whether the universe is infinite in space to begin with, which Mack said is still an open question. Or, the universe might wrap around itself in a higher dimension in the same way that the 2D surface of a sphere wraps around itself in three dimensions, she said.
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Living Universe | Journey To Another Stars - Documentary 4K [2018]

LIVING UNIVERSE is an interstellar adventure that seeks to answer the most profound question of all: are we alone? Based on the latest scientific knowledge, we will take a journey to a planet beyond our solar system in search of life.

We ask the world's leading space scientists what we might find if we travel to a neighboring star system. Recent breakthroughs have proven that every star we see in the sky is orbited by at least one planet, many similar to our own Earth. How do we get to these exoplanets? Once there, what will we find? And what will it mean for humanity when we discover we are not alone?

Our speculative journey through space is set a hundred years in the future - when we have the technology to journey well beyond our solar system. On this first expedition, our star ship Aurora will be piloted not by astronauts, but by the artificial intelligence (A.I.) we call Artemis. We imagine how Artemis travels through space, on its 25-year journey, at one fifth of the speed of light. Its objective is Minerva B, a planet much like our own, with an atmosphere, temperature and liquid water that appears a likely candidate to contain life.

With spectacular special effects we will reach and explore a new planet as we seek to answer the most profound question of all: are we alone in the universe? Our guides on this journey are narrator Dr Karl Kruszelnicki and as the voice of our AI, Artemis, real-life astrophysicist, Professor Tamara Davis.

Inspired and informed by our rapidly developing knowledge of far-off worlds, our best scientists - including NASA engineers, astrophysicists and astronomers - we will discover that this amazing journey is not only possible, it is inevitable. To venture into distant space is our destiny.

LIVING UNIVERSE captures a pivotal moment in the human story. A film full of insight and inspiration certain to thrill anyone who dreams of distant worlds, or have ever wondered why are we here?

Have you ever wondered that someone like you, sitting less than a mile away, in some other universe, exists? The possibility in itself seems frightening as well as astonishing.

From breaking news and intriguing historical documentaries to conspiracy theories, classified NASA files and UFO's. We provide you with material that the government doesn't want you to see. The Insomnia team comes up with a promise. To keep up with the same, the team now brings to us a documentary that aims to change your perspective Of another existence, of another possibility, as today, the scientists now believe there may really be the presence of a parallel universe - and in fact, also believe that there may be an infinite number of parallel universes, and where we live today just happens to be only one of them and many of these other parallel universes come with different laws of physics as well.

These other universes that we are talking about not only contain space, time and strange forms of exotic matter but to surprise you, Some of them may even contain you, only maybe in a slightly different form. The thought itself is quite intriguing and scary on the same hand. The basis of this theory is as we know it the idea that parallel universes are constantly spinning off from reality that we humans know of. Though generally ignored at the time, that theory has gone on to become not just a popular topic of study among respected physicists, but the inspiration for such popular films, television shows, and books as Star Trek and The Golden Compass. according to the sources.

The video soon progresses into the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), that is now changing everything, as some say that the remarkable images reveal the true shape of the universe through baby pictures of the same from the time when it was 4 hundred thousand years old, looking so back in time, when there wasn't even the formation of galaxies yet. The WMAP is catching the very first signs of creation as it is officially tagged with measuring radiation that is left over from Big Bang. And now scientists have devised an experiment to find the overall true shape of the universe. The WMAP hence shows that the universe is flat. From here arises the possibility of more mind boggling parallel universe that are of the level-2 type and is made up of giant cosmic soap bubbles that float in hyperspace. Each of these bubbles within it has a whole universe. Now, the question that arises is that - Do we all live in a giant cosmic bubble?

Journey to another stars
finding lives on other planets

Journey to the Edge of the Universe

“Presenting the first accurate non-stop voyage from Earth to the edge of the Universe using a single, unbroken shot through the use of spectacular Computer Generated Imagery (CGI) technology.”

“Building on images taken from the Hubble telescope, this documentary explores the science and history behind the distant celestial bodies in our solar system.”

“This spectacular, epic voyage across the cosmos, takes us from the Earth, past the Moon and our neighboring planets, out of our Solar System, to the nearest stars, nebulae and galaxies and beyond; right to the edge of the Universe.”

National Geographic 2008.
First Broadcast: December 7, 2008

Director: Yavar Abbas
Writers: Nigel Henbest and Billie Pink
U.S. Edition Narrated by: Alec Baldwin
U.K.Edition Narrated by: Sean Pertwee.

Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news, reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational, or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

-All copyrighted materials contained herein belong to their respective copyright holders. I do not claim ownership over any of these materials. In no way do I benefit financially nor otherwise from this video.
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Journey to the edge of the Universe HD [Alec Baldwin]

Narrated by Alec Baldwin
Journey to the Edge of the Universe is a documentary film broadcast on National Geographic and the Discovery Channel. It documents a space journey from Earth to the edge of the universe itself. The US edition was narrated by Alec Baldwin and the UK edition by Sean Pertwee.
The documentary runs 91 minutes and was broadcast on December 7, 2008.

Subscribe to stay updated and educated

Journey to the edge of the Universe HD [Sean Pertwee]

Narrated by Sean Pertwee
Journey to the Edge of the Universe is a documentary film broadcast on National Geographic and the Discovery Channel. It documents a space journey from Earth to the edge of the universe itself. The US edition was narrated by Alec Baldwin and the UK edition by Sean Pertwee.
The documentary runs 91 minutes and was broadcast on December 7, 2008.

Subscribe to stay updated and educated.

journey to the EDGE of universe in urdu/ hindi HD

کائنات کے کنارے تک کا سفر

ہماری دنیا – آرام دہ اور جانی پہچانی ہے – لیکن جب ہم آسمان کی طرف دیکھتے ہیں تو یہ ضرور سوچتے ہیں کہ کیا ہم کائنات میں کسی غیرمعمولی مقام پر ہیں یا زمیں اور نظامِ شمسی صرف ایک معمولی جگہ پر ہیں – کائنات زندگی کے لیے موزوں ہے یا خطرناک؟ ہم یا تو اس بارے میں یہاں کھڑے کھڑے سوچ سکتے ہیں یا پھر اپنا گھر چھوڑ کر دنیا کی بہترین مہم پر جاسکتے ہیں- حیرتناک دریافتیں کرنے کے لیے – خوفناک مظاہر دیکھنے کے لیے – خوبصورت اور نئی دنیائیں دیکھنے کے لیے – تاریک قوتوں کا سامنا کرنے کے لیے – وقت کی شروعات کو دیکھنے کے لیے – تخلیق کے لمحے تک – کیا ہم میں یہ ہمت ہے کہ یہ سب کچھ دیکھ سکیں؟ کیا ہم خوف سے گھر کو بھاگ کھڑے ہوں گے – یہ جاننے کا صرف ایک ہی طریقہ ہے



ترجمہ: قدیر قریشی

آواز: حماد خالد

ایڈٹنگ: اختر علی شاہ

پیشکش: سائنس کی دنیا



سائنس کی دنیا فیس بک پیج




سائنس کی دنیا فیس بک گروپ



سائنس کی دنیا ویب سائٹ

Journey Through The Known Universe - National Geographic Space Discovery Documentary 2017

Journey Through The Known Universe - National Geographic Space Discovery Documentary 2017
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The Earth is Not Alone - Space Documentary HD

Part 2:
U.S. space agency NASA announced the discovery of more than 200 new planets on Monday, 10 of which are believed to be about the right size and temperature to support life.

Of the 219 new suspected planets to have been discovered by NASA's Kepler telescope, 10 were found to exist in the so-called 'Goldilocks zone' of their solar system. This refers to the distance between the planet and their star, which is neither too hot nor too cold to support complex life.

The presence of liquid water on these rocky Earth-like planets is seen as a key ingredient required for the existence of life.

Are we alone? Maybe Kepler today has told us indirectly, although we need confirmation, that we are probably not alone, Mario Perez, Kepler program scientist, said at a news conference.

NASA launched the Kepler telescope in 2009 in a bid to discover whether other Earth-like planets are common or rare.

The latest identification of suspected exoplanets – planets outside our own solar system – brings the tally discovered by the Kepler telescope to 4,034. The number of worlds thought to be approximately the same size and temperature as Earth is around 50.

Journey Through The Universe- HD Documentary

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How the Universe Works - The Dark Matter Enigma - Space Discovery Documentary

Explore the biggest question of all. How far do the stars stretch out into space? And what's beyond them? In modern times, we built giant telescopes that have allowed us to cast our gaze deep into the universe. Astronomers have been able to look back to near the time of its birth. They've reconstructed the course of cosmic history in astonishing detail. From intensive computer modeling, and myriad close observations, they've uncovered important clues to its ongoing evolution. Many now conclude that what we can see, the stars and galaxies that stretch out to the limits of our vision, represent only a small fraction of all there is. Does the universe go on forever? Where do we fit within it? And how would the great thinkers have wrapped their brains around the far-out ideas on today's cutting edge? For those who find infinity hard to grasp, even troubling, you're not alone. It's a concept that has long tormented even the best minds. Over two thousand years ago, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras and his followers saw numerical relationships as the key to understanding the world around them. But in their investigation of geometric shapes, they discovered that some important ratios could not be expressed in simple numbers. Take the circumference of a circle to its diameter, called Pi. Computer scientists recently calculated Pi to 5 trillion digits, confirming what the Greeks learned: there are no repeating patterns and no ending in sight. The discovery of the so-called irrational numbers like Pi was so disturbing, legend has it, that one member of the Pythagorian cult, Hippassus, was drowned at sea for divulging their existence. A century later, the philosopher Zeno brought infinity into the open with a series of paradoxes: situations that are true, but strongly counter-intuitive. In this modern update of one of Zeno's paradoxes, say you have arrived at an intersection. But you are only allowed to cross the street in increments of half the distance to the other side. So to cross this finite distance, you must take an infinite number of steps. In math today, it's a given that you can subdivide any length an infinite number of times, or find an infinity of points along a line. What made the idea of infinity so troubling to the Greeks is that it clashed with their goal of using numbers to explain the workings of the real world. To the philosopher Aristotle, a century after Zeno, infinity evoked the formless chaos from which the world was thought to have emerged: a primordial state with no natural laws or limits, devoid of all form and content. But if the universe is finite, what would happen if a warrior traveled to the edge and tossed a spear? Where would it go? It would not fly off on an infinite journey, Aristotle said. Rather, it would join the motion of the stars in a crystalline sphere that encircled the Earth. To preserve the idea of a limited universe, Aristotle would craft an historic distinction. On the one hand, Aristotle pointed to the irrational numbers such as Pi. Each new calculation results in an additional digit, but the final, final number in the string can never be specified. So Aristotle called it potentially infinite. Then there's the actually infinite, like the total number of points or subdivisions along a line. It's literally uncountable. Aristotle reserved the status of actually infinite for the so-called prime mover that created the world and is beyond our capacity to understand. This became the basis for what's called the Cosmological, or First Cause, argument for the existence of God. #universedocumentary #spacedocumentary #Universe

We Are The Universe - Space Documentary 2018 HD


The All-Seeing Eye provides you with all the BEST Videos about SPACE and SCIENCE. If you love Space this channel is for you! SUBSCRIBE to keep up to date with our uploads. Lean back and enjoy your Journey through the Universe :)
credit: Neil deGrasse Tyson

Cassini-Huygens a journey to SATURN [ Universe Documentary ] 2017 HD

Please subscribe for more amazing documentaries in best quality and give this video a thumbs up if you enjoyed watching.
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How Did the Universe Begin - Space Discovery Documentary

If you believe the creations of science fiction, black holes serve as gateways to other worlds, either distant parts of this universe or other universes entirely. But the reality might be more complicated than that. And outside of the sci-fi realm, dropping into a black hole is a bad idea.

Even so, it turns out that people who enter a black hole would have at least a slight chance of escaping, either back into their own world or to some exotic place. This is because black holes actually bend space itself, and so could bring points that are ordinarily distant from each other much closer together.

An oft-used analogy is the bending of a piece of paper. If you draw a line on the paper, it follows the paper's shape and the line's length is unchanged by bending the paper. But if you go through the paper, the end points of the line are much closer to one another. Understanding this requires diving into Einstein's theory of relativity as applied to gravity.
#space #documentary #science

The First Moment Of Time | The Universe - Space Documentary HD

When was the first light in the universe?
The speed of light gives us an amazing tool for studying the universe. Because light only travels a mere 300,000 kilometers per second, when we see distant objects, we're looking back in time.
You're not seeing the sun as it is today, you're seeing an 8 minute old sun. You're seeing 642 year-old Betelgeuse. 2.5 million year-old Andromeda. In fact, you can keep doing this, looking further out, and deeper into time. Since the universe is expanding today, it was closer in the past.
Run the universe clock backwards, right to the beginning, and you get to a place that was hotter and denser than it is today. So dense that the entire universe shortly after the Big Bang was just a soup of protons, neutrons and electrons, with nothing holding them together.
In fact, once it expanded and cooled down a bit, the entire universe was merely as hot and as dense as the core of a star like our sun. It was cool enough for ionized atoms of hydrogen to form.
Because the universe has the conditions of the core of a star, it had the temperature and pressure to actually fuse hydrogen into helium and other heavier elements. Based on the ratio of those elements we see in the universe today: 74% hydrogen, 25% helium and 1% miscellaneous, we know how long the universe was in this whole universe is a star condition.

The fusion process generates photons of gamma radiation. In the core of our sun, these photons bounce from atom to atom, eventually making their way out of the core, through the sun's radiative zone, and eventually out into space. This process can take tens of thousands of years. But in the early universe, there was nowhere for these primordial photons of gamma radiation to go. Everywhere was more hot, dense universe.

The universe was continuing to expand, and finally, just a few hundred thousand years after the Big Bang, the universe was finally cool enough for these atoms of hydrogen and helium to attract free electrons, turning them into neutral atoms.
This was the moment of first light in the universe, between 240,000 and 300,000 years after the Big Bang, known as the Era of Recombination. The first time that photons could rest for a second, attached as electrons to atoms. It was at this point that the universe went from being totally opaque, to transparent.

And this is the earliest possible light that astronomers can see. Go ahead, say it with me: the cosmic microwave background radiation. Because the universe has been expanding over the 13.8 billion years from then until now, the those earliest photons were stretched out, or red-shifted, from ultraviolet and visible light into the microwave end of the spectrum.

If you could see the universe with microwave eyes, you'd see that first blast of radiation in all directions. The universe celebrating its existence.
After that first blast of light, everything was dark, there were no stars or galaxies, just enormous amounts of these primordial elements. At the beginning of these dark ages, the temperature of the entire universe was about 4000 kelvin. Compare that with the 2.7 kelvin we see today. By the end of the dark ages, 150 million years later, the temperature was a more reasonable 60 kelvin.

For the next 850 million years or so, these elements came together into monster stars of pure hydrogen and helium. Without heavier elements, they were free to form stars with dozens or even hundreds of times the mass of our own sun. These are the Population III stars, or the first stars, and we don't have telescopes powerful enough to see them yet. Astronomers indirectly estimate that those first stars formed about 560 million years after the Big Bang.

Then, those first stars exploded as supernovae, more massive stars formed and they detonated as well. It's seriously difficult to imagine what that time must have looked like, with stars going off like fireworks. But we know it was so common and so violent that it lit up the whole universe in an era called reionization. Most of the universe was hot plasma.
The early universe was hot and awful, and there weren't a lot of the heavier elements that life as we know it depends on. Just think about it. You can't get oxygen without fusion in a star, even multiple generations. Our own solar system is the result of several generations of supernovae that exploded, seeding our region with heavier and heavier elements.

As I mentioned earlier in the article, the universe cooled from 4000 kelvin down to 60 kelvin. About 10 million years after the Big Bang, the temperature of the universe was 100 C, the boiling point of water. And then 7 million years later, it was down to 0 C, the freezing point of water.

This has led astronomers to theorize that for about 7 million years, liquid water was present across the universe… everywhere. And wherever we find liquid water on Earth, we find life.

How the Universe Works -Are Black Holes Real? - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works S06E01 Are Black Holes Real?
lack Holes are known to swallow everything coming in their path but that's not the end. With time they they emit enormous amounts of energy.

In 2015 Hubble Telescope captured something that shocked the entire world. It was a burst of plasma jet 260 million light years away in space coming from an unknown source. Calculations showed that the jet was travelling at 98% the speed of light.

Scientists finally concluded that they have captured a plasma burst coming from a super-massive Black Hole. Which is located inside a galaxy 260 million light-years away.
# Space #UniverseDocumentary #Universe

How the Universe Works - Blow your Mind of the Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

Explore the biggest question of all. How far do the stars stretch out into space? And what's beyond them? In modern times, we built giant telescopes that have allowed us to cast our gaze deep into the universe. Astronomers have been able to look back to near the time of its birth. They've reconstructed the course of cosmic history in astonishing detail. From intensive computer modeling, and myriad close observations, they've uncovered important clues to its ongoing evolution. Many now conclude that what we can see, the stars and galaxies that stretch out to the limits of our vision, represent only a small fraction of all there is. Does the universe go on forever? Where do we fit within it? And how would the great thinkers have wrapped their brains around the far-out ideas on today's cutting edge? For those who find infinity hard to grasp, even troubling, you're not alone. It's a concept that has long tormented even the best minds. Over two thousand years ago, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras and his followers saw numerical relationships as the key to understanding the world around them. But in their investigation of geometric shapes, they discovered that some important ratios could not be expressed in simple numbers. Take the circumference of a circle to its diameter, called Pi. Computer scientists recently calculated Pi to 5 trillion digits, confirming what the Greeks learned: there are no repeating patterns and no ending in sight. The discovery of the so-called irrational numbers like Pi was so disturbing, legend has it, that one member of the Pythagorian cult, Hippassus, was drowned at sea for divulging their existence. A century later, the philosopher Zeno brought infinity into the open with a series of paradoxes: situations that are true, but strongly counter-intuitive. In this modern update of one of Zeno's paradoxes, say you have arrived at an intersection. But you are only allowed to cross the street in increments of half the distance to the other side. So to cross this finite distance, you must take an infinite number of steps. In math today, it's a given that you can subdivide any length an infinite number of times, or find an infinity of points along a line. What made the idea of infinity so troubling to the Greeks is that it clashed with their goal of using numbers to explain the workings of the real world. To the philosopher Aristotle, a century after Zeno, infinity evoked the formless chaos from which the world was thought to have emerged: a primordial state with no natural laws or limits, devoid of all form and content. But if the universe is finite, what would happen if a warrior traveled to the edge and tossed a spear? Where would it go? It would not fly off on an infinite journey, Aristotle said. Rather, it would join the motion of the stars in a crystalline sphere that encircled the Earth. To preserve the idea of a limited universe, Aristotle would craft an historic distinction. On the one hand, Aristotle pointed to the irrational numbers such as Pi. Each new calculation results in an additional digit, but the final, final number in the string can never be specified. So Aristotle called it potentially infinite. Then there's the actually infinite, like the total number of points or subdivisions along a line. It's literally uncountable. Aristotle reserved the status of actually infinite for the so-called prime mover that created the world and is beyond our capacity to understand. This became the basis for what's called the Cosmological, or First Cause, argument for the existence of God. #universedocumentary #spacedocumentary #Universe

How The Universe Works - Universe Explore - Space Discovery Documentary

Search for Second Earth' tells the story of an extraordinary odyssey, a scientific and human story that began 500 years ago with Copernicus and Galileo. And it takes us beyond the stars to the far reaches of the universe in search of life somewhere other than Earth. To date, astronomers have detected over 3000 planets located outside the solar system. When one thinks that twenty years ago, the only planets we could observe were those in our own solar system, this is both a revolution and a revelation. With the construction of giant telescopes, thousands or even millions of other worlds will soon be discovered. These so-called exoplanets are all very different. But could any of them support life? The most recent research shows that life is much more tenacious and resilient than we once thought. Are we alone in the universe? This question, which for so long was chiefly a religious and philosophical one, has now become rational and scientific. If other inhabited planets exist, how can we detect them? How can we discover what flora, fauna or even what kind of strange civilisations they may host? And above all, how do we get there? This documentary offers secondary science teachers stimulus materials to help students to imagine the future possibility of humans making an as-yet impossible voyage into the cosmos in search of the life forms that might be found there. Search for Second Earth explores a voyage into the infinite, which will also teach us a great deal about our own planet and the origins of life here.
#universedocumentary #spacedocumentary #Universe

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