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Lecture 12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

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Lecture 12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the study of Deuteronomy and traces the contribution of the Deuteronomistic School: a historiosophy according to which Israel's fortunes are dependent upon and an indicator of her fidelity to the covenant. The books of the Former Prophets are introduced with attention to their historical and geographical context. The book of Joshua's account of Israel's conquest of Canaan is contrasted with scholarly accounts of Israel's emergence in Canaan and formation as a nation state.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Deuteronomy: A Capstone to the Pentateuchal Narrative
06:05 - Chapter 2. Source Theory and the Pentateuch
13:26 - Chapter 3. Introduction to the Former Prophets
21:54 - Chapter 4. Geographical Setting and Its Historical Implications
27:39 - Chapter 5. Structure of Joshua
34:29 - Chapter 6. Three Scholarly Models for the Emergence of the Nation State of Israel

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

Overview

This lecture concludes the study of Deuteronomy and traces the contribution of the Deuteronomistic School: a historiosophy according to which Israel's fortunes are dependent upon and an indicator of her fidelity to the covenant. The books of the Former Prophets are introduced with attention to their historical and geographical context. The book of Joshua's account of Israel's conquest of Canaan is contrasted with scholarly accounts of Israel's emergence in Canaan and formation as a nation state.

Resources

Palestine in the Time of Saul. Atlas of the Historical Geography of the Holy Land. Smith, George Adam. London, 1915.
Courtesy of the University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin


Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Joshua (JSB pp. 462-464), Joshua 1-13, 20, 23-24
(2) Introduction to Judges (JSB pp. 508-510), Judges 1-8, 13-16, 19-21
(3) Introduction to the Prophets (JSB pp. 451-461)
(4) Early Nonrabbinic Interpretation (JSB pp. 1835-1844)
(5) Midrash and Midrashic Interpretation (JSB pp. 1863-1876)

Selections from Interpretation, History of in The Anchor Bible Dictionary (pp. 424-427, 434-436)

Optional:
Reis, Pamela Tamarkin. Spoiled Child: A Fresh Look at Jephthah's Daughter. In Reading the Lines: A Fresh Look at the Hebrew Bible Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson Publishers, 2002.
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The Unity of the Deuteronomistic History

What is your evaluation of Martin Noth's theory of the Deuteronomist and the unity of the so-called Deuteronomistic History?
Dr. Richard L. Pratt, Jr.

Martin Noth's theory about the Deuteronomistic History is just that — it's a theory, which means that it is not absolutely certain, and people will disagree with it, as they have, and they'll modify it, as they have ever since the time he first enunciated it. But, in effect, most evangelicals are right to say that this part of the Bible, that we call often the Deuteronomistic History, is in fact a unity, but the nature of that unity is very difficult to put your finger on or identify specifically. So, evangelicals had different views of what the unity of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings actually is. It's clear that all of these books depend heavily on the language of the book of Deuteronomy. That's a unifying factor. They draw from it. In fact, they actually quote it from time to time. It's also clear that the theological emphases of the book of Deuteronomy are also evident in those books as well. And so, I often think of the Deuteronomic or the Deuteronomistic History as more or less sort of like a denomination in Israel, sort of like a part of the body there in Israel, where they had a way of speaking, a way of looking at things, a way of talking about things that were definitely oriented toward the book of Deuteronomy. Now, in Martin Noth's view, the book of Deuteronomy itself was actually completed long after the time of Moses — in the exile, as a matter of fact. But the reality is that, as evangelicals, we should not believe that. We should believe that Deuteronomy is the Mosaic basis of this prophetic history that we call the Deuteronomistic History. We call it prophetic because it does apply the criteria of the book of Deuteronomy to the historical events that it reports in Joshua and Judges and Samuel and Kings. Now, it applies those theological evaluations in different ways, to be sure, but each of those books relies heavily on Deuteronomy, and in that sense, they have a great deal of unity.

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Lecture 13. The Deuteronomistic History: Prophets and Kings (1 and 2 Samuel)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The transition from a tribal society under the leadership of elders and eventually charismatic judges to a nation under a monarch is traced through the books of Judges and 1 and 2 Samuel. Early stories of local heroes are woven together into a larger history that conforms to the exilic perspectives of the Deuteronomistic School. An extended look at representations of Saul and David (including God's covenant with David) reveal historical shifts and some ambivalence about monarchy and the ideal form of leadership.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Distinguishing between Israelis and Israelites
01:53 - Chapter 2. An Alliance of Tribes
05:46 - Chapter 3. The Book of Judges
23:05 - Chapter 4. Samuel, a Transition Figure and the Last in a Line of Prophet Judges
32:46 - Chapter 5. Saul and David as Representations of Ambivalence about Monarchy
45:14 - Chapter 6. The Davidic Covenant

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Deuteronomistic History, Pt 1

Gives an introduction and covers material from Joshua to time of King David.
(Recorded with

Lecture 14. The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The tension between covenant theology, emphasizing the conditional Mosaic convenant from Mt. Sinai, and royal theology emphasizing the unconditional covenant with David in his palace on Mt. Zion, is traced. Following Solomon's death, the united kingdom separated into a northern and a southern kingdom (named Israel and Judah respectively), the former falling to the Assyrians in 722 and the latter to the Babylonians in 586. Analysis of the Deuteronomistic School's response to these historical crises and subsequent exile to Babylonia is evidenced through redaction criticism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Uncompromising Honesty of the Story of David
10:29 - Chapter 2. Tensions in Kings I and II
31:21 - Chapter 3. The Separation of the Kingdom Following Solomon's Death
42:10 - Chapter 4. Historiosophy of the Deuteronomistic School

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Deuteronomistic History

Evaluation of Martin Noth

What is your evaluation of Martin Noth's theory of the Deuteronomist and the unity of the so-called Deuteronomistic History?
Dr. Jim Hamilton

So, scholars have looked at Deuteronomy through Kings and they've seen something that's really there. They've seen that a lot of the phrases that start occurring in Deuteronomy are reused all through Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings. There's just a load of language, terminology, concepts, a fund of sort of stock imagery and stock phrases that gets used and reused across these books. That's really there. The question is how do we explain it? And there's a strain of, I would say, unbelieving scholarship that looks at this and they explain it essentially as propaganda. Their view is that at the time of Josiah's reformation, or renewal, or however we want to describe what King Josiah did, that Josiah got people onto this program and then essentially he invented holy books, or someone working for him invented a whole set of holy books that served as propaganda because they leant ancient, legitimating authority to Josiah's program. And these are people that would think that the book of Deuteronomy ought to be dated to that period, and then, that Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings, they were all produced essentially around the time of Josiah in pursuit of his program. That way of looking at the material is basically claiming that the story that is told on the surface of the text is not the real story. The real story is in back of the surface of the text, and the surface of the text is just propaganda. And I think that's a skeptical and uncharitable way to approach this material. A better^^elli^^ A way to approach the material that actually abides by and holds to what the texts themselves claim for themselves would be to look at this material and say, well, the book of Deuteronomy claims, at a number of places, that Moses was responsible for this material, and then these other texts, they all attest to the profound significance of Moses. So, I don't think it should surprise us when we find Moses using all this language in Deuteronomy, and then we find these later authors who come after Moses picking up the language and the concepts that they learn from Deuteronomy and essentially describing the world through what we might call the lens that is ground in the book of Deuteronomy. So, that's the way that I would explain this material. I think there's a better, more biblical way to account for all of this language and imagery that derives from Deuteronomy than the Deuteronomistic hypothesis. I think, more likely, Moses had the profound impact that the texts indicate he had and then later biblical authors were deeply influenced by the way that he described things.
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Introduction to the Deuteronomistic History

Nowadays, biblical scholars usually refer to Joshua through 2 Kings as the Deuteronomistic HIstory. This video briefly explains why.

Historical Books/Joshua & Judges

This is an introduction to the historical books of the Bible with a focus on Joshua & Judges and the Deuteronomistic History. We look at the history of Israel in the Land as a whole and how this deuteronomistic history plays out.
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OT THEOLOGY Historical Books 1

Dr Saunders 2 2 15 O T session 3 A , OT Theology six

Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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13. The Deuteronomistic History: Prophets and Kings (1 and 2 Samuel)

Overview

The transition from a tribal society under the leadership of elders and eventually charismatic judges to a nation under a monarch is traced through the books of Judges and 1 and 2 Samuel. Early stories of local heroes are woven together into a larger history that conforms to the exilic perspectives of the Deuteronomistic School. An extended look at representations of Saul and David (including God's covenant with David) reveal historical shifts and some ambivalence about monarchy and the ideal form of leadership.

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Samuel (JSB pp. 558-61), 1 Sam, 2 Sam
(2) Introduction to Kings (JSB pp. 668-71), 1 Kgs 3, 11-12, 16:29-19:21, 21-22; 2 Kgs 8:25-10:36, 17-25
(3) Historical and Geographical Background to the Bible (JSB pp. 2052-2055)

Sternberg, Meir. The Poetics of Biblical Narrative. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985. pp. 186-222

Optional:
Levinson, Deirdre. The Psychopathology of King Saul. In Out of the Garden: Women Writers on the Bible, eds., Christina Buchmann and Celina Spiegel. New York: Fawcett Columbine, 1994. pp. 123-141

Ozick, Cynthia. Hannah and Elkanah: Torah as the Matrix for Feminism. In Out of the Garden: Women Writers on the Bible, eds., Christina Buchmann and Celina Spiegel. New York: Fawcett Columbine, 1994. pp. 88-93

Lecture 3. The Hebrew Bible in Its Ancient Near Eastern Setting: Genesis 1-4 in Context

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In the first of a series of lectures on the book of Genesis, the basic elements of biblical monotheism are compared with Ancient Near Eastern texts to show a non-mythological, non-theogonic conception of the deity, a new conception of the purpose and meaning of human life, nature, magic and myth, sin and evil, ethics (including the universal moral law) and history. The two creation stories are explored and the work of Nahum Sarna is introduced.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Creation Story in Enuma Elish
12:44 - Chapter 2. The Creation Stories in Genesis
28:30 - Chapter 3. Creation as God Imposing Order on the World
38:17 - Allusion to and Resonances of Ancient Near Eastern Themes

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

History & the Bible 10: The Judges

A study in the period of the Judges of Israel. This is part of a larger series on Ancient History: A Framework for the Bible. Go to for further videos in this series.
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The Book of Judges (Brief)

A very brief lecture over the Book of Judges.

Lectures in Deuteronomy

Food & the Bible Study- Joshua 5

Biblical Literature Lecture 05 Historical Books and the Deuteronomistic History

Lecture 9. The Priestly Legacy: Cult and Sacrifice, Purity and Holiness in Leviticus and Numbers

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, the Priestly source (P) found primarily in Leviticus and Numbers is introduced. The symbolism of the sacrificial cult and purity system, the differences between moral and ritual impurity, as well as holiness and purity are explained within the Priestly context. The concept of holiness and imitatio dei, or human imitation of God, is explained.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to the Israelite Sanctuary
09:19 - Chapter 2. The Priestly Conceptions of Holiness and Time
13:36 - Chapter 3. Holiness, Purity, Moral and Ritual Impurity
23:30 - Chapter 4. Ritual Purification, Sacrifices and Offerings, and Imitatio Dei
29:13 - Chapter 5. Moral Impurity, Defiling the Land and Purification
42:34 - Chapter 6. Dietary Law and the Holiness Code

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

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