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Lecture 12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

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Lecture 12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the study of Deuteronomy and traces the contribution of the Deuteronomistic School: a historiosophy according to which Israel's fortunes are dependent upon and an indicator of her fidelity to the covenant. The books of the Former Prophets are introduced with attention to their historical and geographical context. The book of Joshua's account of Israel's conquest of Canaan is contrasted with scholarly accounts of Israel's emergence in Canaan and formation as a nation state.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Deuteronomy: A Capstone to the Pentateuchal Narrative
06:05 - Chapter 2. Source Theory and the Pentateuch
13:26 - Chapter 3. Introduction to the Former Prophets
21:54 - Chapter 4. Geographical Setting and Its Historical Implications
27:39 - Chapter 5. Structure of Joshua
34:29 - Chapter 6. Three Scholarly Models for the Emergence of the Nation State of Israel

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

Overview

This lecture concludes the study of Deuteronomy and traces the contribution of the Deuteronomistic School: a historiosophy according to which Israel's fortunes are dependent upon and an indicator of her fidelity to the covenant. The books of the Former Prophets are introduced with attention to their historical and geographical context. The book of Joshua's account of Israel's conquest of Canaan is contrasted with scholarly accounts of Israel's emergence in Canaan and formation as a nation state.

Resources

Palestine in the Time of Saul. Atlas of the Historical Geography of the Holy Land. Smith, George Adam. London, 1915.
Courtesy of the University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin


Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Joshua (JSB pp. 462-464), Joshua 1-13, 20, 23-24
(2) Introduction to Judges (JSB pp. 508-510), Judges 1-8, 13-16, 19-21
(3) Introduction to the Prophets (JSB pp. 451-461)
(4) Early Nonrabbinic Interpretation (JSB pp. 1835-1844)
(5) Midrash and Midrashic Interpretation (JSB pp. 1863-1876)

Selections from Interpretation, History of in The Anchor Bible Dictionary (pp. 424-427, 434-436)

Optional:
Reis, Pamela Tamarkin. Spoiled Child: A Fresh Look at Jephthah's Daughter. In Reading the Lines: A Fresh Look at the Hebrew Bible Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson Publishers, 2002.
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Lecture 13. The Deuteronomistic History: Prophets and Kings (1 and 2 Samuel)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The transition from a tribal society under the leadership of elders and eventually charismatic judges to a nation under a monarch is traced through the books of Judges and 1 and 2 Samuel. Early stories of local heroes are woven together into a larger history that conforms to the exilic perspectives of the Deuteronomistic School. An extended look at representations of Saul and David (including God's covenant with David) reveal historical shifts and some ambivalence about monarchy and the ideal form of leadership.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Distinguishing between Israelis and Israelites
01:53 - Chapter 2. An Alliance of Tribes
05:46 - Chapter 3. The Book of Judges
23:05 - Chapter 4. Samuel, a Transition Figure and the Last in a Line of Prophet Judges
32:46 - Chapter 5. Saul and David as Representations of Ambivalence about Monarchy
45:14 - Chapter 6. The Davidic Covenant

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 14. The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The tension between covenant theology, emphasizing the conditional Mosaic convenant from Mt. Sinai, and royal theology emphasizing the unconditional covenant with David in his palace on Mt. Zion, is traced. Following Solomon's death, the united kingdom separated into a northern and a southern kingdom (named Israel and Judah respectively), the former falling to the Assyrians in 722 and the latter to the Babylonians in 586. Analysis of the Deuteronomistic School's response to these historical crises and subsequent exile to Babylonia is evidenced through redaction criticism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Uncompromising Honesty of the Story of David
10:29 - Chapter 2. Tensions in Kings I and II
31:21 - Chapter 3. The Separation of the Kingdom Following Solomon's Death
42:10 - Chapter 4. Historiosophy of the Deuteronomistic School

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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The Unity of the Deuteronomistic History

What is your evaluation of Martin Noth's theory of the Deuteronomist and the unity of the so-called Deuteronomistic History?
Dr. Richard L. Pratt, Jr.

Martin Noth's theory about the Deuteronomistic History is just that — it's a theory, which means that it is not absolutely certain, and people will disagree with it, as they have, and they'll modify it, as they have ever since the time he first enunciated it. But, in effect, most evangelicals are right to say that this part of the Bible, that we call often the Deuteronomistic History, is in fact a unity, but the nature of that unity is very difficult to put your finger on or identify specifically. So, evangelicals had different views of what the unity of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings actually is. It's clear that all of these books depend heavily on the language of the book of Deuteronomy. That's a unifying factor. They draw from it. In fact, they actually quote it from time to time. It's also clear that the theological emphases of the book of Deuteronomy are also evident in those books as well. And so, I often think of the Deuteronomic or the Deuteronomistic History as more or less sort of like a denomination in Israel, sort of like a part of the body there in Israel, where they had a way of speaking, a way of looking at things, a way of talking about things that were definitely oriented toward the book of Deuteronomy. Now, in Martin Noth's view, the book of Deuteronomy itself was actually completed long after the time of Moses — in the exile, as a matter of fact. But the reality is that, as evangelicals, we should not believe that. We should believe that Deuteronomy is the Mosaic basis of this prophetic history that we call the Deuteronomistic History. We call it prophetic because it does apply the criteria of the book of Deuteronomy to the historical events that it reports in Joshua and Judges and Samuel and Kings. Now, it applies those theological evaluations in different ways, to be sure, but each of those books relies heavily on Deuteronomy, and in that sense, they have a great deal of unity.

Learn more at

Deuteronomistic History

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Introduction to the Deuteronomistic History

Nowadays, biblical scholars usually refer to Joshua through 2 Kings as the Deuteronomistic HIstory. This video briefly explains why.

Lecture 11. On the Steps of Moab: Deuteronomy

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture, focusing on Moses's final address to the Israelites and transfer of authority to Joshua, describes Moses as the paradigmatic leader of biblical tradition. The structure of Deuteronomy is then outlined. Attention is given to updated and revised laws within Deuteronomy which exemplify the activity of adaptive interpretation of earlier tradition. The main themes of Deuteronomy are presented and include the notion of God's chosen people and chosen city, social justice, covenantal love and the centralization of cultic worship.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Moses as the Paradigmatic Leader of Biblical Tradition
08:46 - Chapter 2. Basic Structure of Deuteronomy
22:16 - Chapter 3. Updated and Revised Laws According to New Ideas
37:31 - Chapter 4. Major Themes in Deuteronomy

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

The Composition of the Deuteronomistic History

You can buy Deuteronomy through 2 Kings in most bookstores, as part of a Jewish or Christian Bible. But how did the Deuteronomistic History originate? This video introduces the two-edition model of the work's composition.

Deuteronomistic History Pt 1

Video #6 for RELS 101 Old Testament/Hebrew Scriptures
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Lecture 2 - The Deuteronomistic History

The second in the lecture series for the SVP OT Fall 2013 class.

Deuteronomistic History, Pt 1

Gives an introduction and covers material from Joshua to time of King David.
(Recorded with
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Deuteronomistic Theology

An 18 minute introduction to deuteronomistic theology

Lecture 17. Literary Prophecy: Hosea and Isaiah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The lecture focuses on the eighth-century northern prophet Hosea, a linguistically difficult book set against the backdrop of the expansionist Assyrian Empire. Hosea's marriage symbolizes Israel's relationship with God and serves to remind Israel of God's forbearance and Israel's obligations and pledge to loyalty under the covenant at Sinai. The second half of the lecture shifts to Isaiah and his emphasis on the Davidic Covenant, rather than the Mosaic one, a key distinction between him and Hosea. Themes in Isaiah include the salvation of a remnant, Israel's election to a mission and an eschatology that centers around a messiah (anointed) king of the house of David.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Historical Background for and Major Themes of the Book of Hosea
13:29 - Chapter 2. Doom and Hope as Two Conceptions of Covenant
18:00 - Chapter 3. Historical Background for and Structure of the Book of Isaiah
25:55 - Chapter 4. Emphasis on the Davidic Covenant
36:47 - Chapter 5. Major Themes in the Book of Isaiah

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 20. Responses to Suffering and Evil: Lamentations and Wisdom Literature

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture begins with the Book of Lamentations, a short book of dirges that laments the destruction of Jerusalem and moves on to introduce the third and final section of the Hebrew Bible - the Ketuvim, or Writings. This section of the Bible contains three books that exemplify the ancient Near Eastern literary genre of Wisdom -- Proverbs, Job and Ecclesiastes. Proverbs reinforces the Deuteronomistic idea of divine retributive justice according to which the good prosper and the evil are punished. The conventional assumption of a moral world order is attacked in the Book of Job. The book explores whether people will sustain virtue when suffering and afflicted, and brings charges of negligence and mismanagement against God for failing to punish the wicked and allowing the righteous to suffer.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Lamentations
08:31 - Chapter 2. An Introduction to Wisdom Books in the Ketuvim
13:19 - Chapter 3. The Book of Proverbs
19:48 - Chapter 4. Structure of and Literary Components in The Book of Job
25:40 - Chapter 5. Prose Prologue in the Book of Job
30:36 - Chapter 6. Poetic Speech Cycles in the Book of Job
45:26 - Chapter 7. God's Response in the Book of Job

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Lecture 24. Alternative Visions: Esther, Ruth, and Jonah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, two final books of the Bible are examined and their attitudes towards foreign nations compared. In contrast to Daniel's reliance on divine intervention to punish the wicked, the book of Esther focuses on human initiative in defeating the enemies of Israel. Finally, the book of Jonah--in which the wicked Assyrians repent and are spared divine punishment--expresses the view that God is compassionate and concerned with all creation. Professor Hayes concludes the course with remarks regarding the dynamic and complex messages presented in the Hebrew Bible.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Esther
09:29 - Chapter 2. The Book of Jonah
20:32 - Chapter 3. Concluding Remarks about the Dynamic and Complex Messages in the Hebrew Bible

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

History & the Bible 10: The Judges

A study in the period of the Judges of Israel. This is part of a larger series on Ancient History: A Framework for the Bible. Go to for further videos in this series.

Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Moses, Joshua and Judges: Ancient History & Archaeology of Middle East

Based on articles by Bob Porter looking at the archaeology of the late Early Bronze Age to the early Late Bronze Age. He works towards reconciling Old Testament and Historical/ Archeological traditions. He covers Exodus at end of Old Kingdom to the Conquest at end of Early Bronze III. Part 1: Egypt and Part 2: Canaan. (Talk 7 Oct 2017)

Biblical Literature Lecture 05 Historical Books and the Deuteronomistic History

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