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Lecture 12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

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Lecture 12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the study of Deuteronomy and traces the contribution of the Deuteronomistic School: a historiosophy according to which Israel's fortunes are dependent upon and an indicator of her fidelity to the covenant. The books of the Former Prophets are introduced with attention to their historical and geographical context. The book of Joshua's account of Israel's conquest of Canaan is contrasted with scholarly accounts of Israel's emergence in Canaan and formation as a nation state.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Deuteronomy: A Capstone to the Pentateuchal Narrative
06:05 - Chapter 2. Source Theory and the Pentateuch
13:26 - Chapter 3. Introduction to the Former Prophets
21:54 - Chapter 4. Geographical Setting and Its Historical Implications
27:39 - Chapter 5. Structure of Joshua
34:29 - Chapter 6. Three Scholarly Models for the Emergence of the Nation State of Israel

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

Overview

This lecture concludes the study of Deuteronomy and traces the contribution of the Deuteronomistic School: a historiosophy according to which Israel's fortunes are dependent upon and an indicator of her fidelity to the covenant. The books of the Former Prophets are introduced with attention to their historical and geographical context. The book of Joshua's account of Israel's conquest of Canaan is contrasted with scholarly accounts of Israel's emergence in Canaan and formation as a nation state.

Resources

Palestine in the Time of Saul. Atlas of the Historical Geography of the Holy Land. Smith, George Adam. London, 1915.
Courtesy of the University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin


Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Joshua (JSB pp. 462-464), Joshua 1-13, 20, 23-24
(2) Introduction to Judges (JSB pp. 508-510), Judges 1-8, 13-16, 19-21
(3) Introduction to the Prophets (JSB pp. 451-461)
(4) Early Nonrabbinic Interpretation (JSB pp. 1835-1844)
(5) Midrash and Midrashic Interpretation (JSB pp. 1863-1876)

Selections from Interpretation, History of in The Anchor Bible Dictionary (pp. 424-427, 434-436)

Optional:
Reis, Pamela Tamarkin. Spoiled Child: A Fresh Look at Jephthah's Daughter. In Reading the Lines: A Fresh Look at the Hebrew Bible Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson Publishers, 2002.
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Lecture 13. The Deuteronomistic History: Prophets and Kings (1 and 2 Samuel)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The transition from a tribal society under the leadership of elders and eventually charismatic judges to a nation under a monarch is traced through the books of Judges and 1 and 2 Samuel. Early stories of local heroes are woven together into a larger history that conforms to the exilic perspectives of the Deuteronomistic School. An extended look at representations of Saul and David (including God's covenant with David) reveal historical shifts and some ambivalence about monarchy and the ideal form of leadership.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Distinguishing between Israelis and Israelites
01:53 - Chapter 2. An Alliance of Tribes
05:46 - Chapter 3. The Book of Judges
23:05 - Chapter 4. Samuel, a Transition Figure and the Last in a Line of Prophet Judges
32:46 - Chapter 5. Saul and David as Representations of Ambivalence about Monarchy
45:14 - Chapter 6. The Davidic Covenant

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 14. The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The tension between covenant theology, emphasizing the conditional Mosaic convenant from Mt. Sinai, and royal theology emphasizing the unconditional covenant with David in his palace on Mt. Zion, is traced. Following Solomon's death, the united kingdom separated into a northern and a southern kingdom (named Israel and Judah respectively), the former falling to the Assyrians in 722 and the latter to the Babylonians in 586. Analysis of the Deuteronomistic School's response to these historical crises and subsequent exile to Babylonia is evidenced through redaction criticism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Uncompromising Honesty of the Story of David
10:29 - Chapter 2. Tensions in Kings I and II
31:21 - Chapter 3. The Separation of the Kingdom Following Solomon's Death
42:10 - Chapter 4. Historiosophy of the Deuteronomistic School

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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The Unity of the Deuteronomistic History

What is your evaluation of Martin Noth's theory of the Deuteronomist and the unity of the so-called Deuteronomistic History?
Dr. Richard L. Pratt, Jr.

Martin Noth's theory about the Deuteronomistic History is just that — it's a theory, which means that it is not absolutely certain, and people will disagree with it, as they have, and they'll modify it, as they have ever since the time he first enunciated it. But, in effect, most evangelicals are right to say that this part of the Bible, that we call often the Deuteronomistic History, is in fact a unity, but the nature of that unity is very difficult to put your finger on or identify specifically. So, evangelicals had different views of what the unity of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings actually is. It's clear that all of these books depend heavily on the language of the book of Deuteronomy. That's a unifying factor. They draw from it. In fact, they actually quote it from time to time. It's also clear that the theological emphases of the book of Deuteronomy are also evident in those books as well. And so, I often think of the Deuteronomic or the Deuteronomistic History as more or less sort of like a denomination in Israel, sort of like a part of the body there in Israel, where they had a way of speaking, a way of looking at things, a way of talking about things that were definitely oriented toward the book of Deuteronomy. Now, in Martin Noth's view, the book of Deuteronomy itself was actually completed long after the time of Moses — in the exile, as a matter of fact. But the reality is that, as evangelicals, we should not believe that. We should believe that Deuteronomy is the Mosaic basis of this prophetic history that we call the Deuteronomistic History. We call it prophetic because it does apply the criteria of the book of Deuteronomy to the historical events that it reports in Joshua and Judges and Samuel and Kings. Now, it applies those theological evaluations in different ways, to be sure, but each of those books relies heavily on Deuteronomy, and in that sense, they have a great deal of unity.

Learn more at

Introduction to the Deuteronomistic History

Nowadays, biblical scholars usually refer to Joshua through 2 Kings as the Deuteronomistic HIstory. This video briefly explains why.
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Biblical Literature Lecture 05 Historical Books and the Deuteronomistic History

Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

13. The Deuteronomistic History: Prophets and Kings (1 and 2 Samuel)

Overview

The transition from a tribal society under the leadership of elders and eventually charismatic judges to a nation under a monarch is traced through the books of Judges and 1 and 2 Samuel. Early stories of local heroes are woven together into a larger history that conforms to the exilic perspectives of the Deuteronomistic School. An extended look at representations of Saul and David (including God's covenant with David) reveal historical shifts and some ambivalence about monarchy and the ideal form of leadership.

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Samuel (JSB pp. 558-61), 1 Sam, 2 Sam
(2) Introduction to Kings (JSB pp. 668-71), 1 Kgs 3, 11-12, 16:29-19:21, 21-22; 2 Kgs 8:25-10:36, 17-25
(3) Historical and Geographical Background to the Bible (JSB pp. 2052-2055)

Sternberg, Meir. The Poetics of Biblical Narrative. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985. pp. 186-222

Optional:
Levinson, Deirdre. The Psychopathology of King Saul. In Out of the Garden: Women Writers on the Bible, eds., Christina Buchmann and Celina Spiegel. New York: Fawcett Columbine, 1994. pp. 123-141

Ozick, Cynthia. Hannah and Elkanah: Torah as the Matrix for Feminism. In Out of the Garden: Women Writers on the Bible, eds., Christina Buchmann and Celina Spiegel. New York: Fawcett Columbine, 1994. pp. 88-93

Deuteronomistic History

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Lecture 7. Israel in Egypt: Moses and the Beginning of Yahwism (Genesis 37- Exodus 4)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The book of Genesis concludes with the story of Joseph and the descent of the 12 tribes into Egypt, setting the stage for the Exodus in which God is seen as redeemer and liberator. Moses is the first in a line of apostolic (messenger) prophets and Yahwism is initiated. Mark Smith's thesis describing the emergence of Israelite religion through a process of convergence and divergence is presented as an alternative to the evolutionary-revolutionary dichotomy presented in Lecture 2.

00:00 - Chapter 1. One Who Wrestles: The Significance of Jacob's Name Change
03:04 - Chapter 2. The 12 Sons of Jacob: Joseph and His Brothers
10:06 - Chapter 3. Exodus: Sequel to Genesis and Myth of Origins for a Nation
21:14 - Chapter 4. Moses's Legendary Birth Story and Early Life
26:43 - Chapter 5. Descriptions of God in the Bible
38:39 - Chapter 6. Smith's Convergence and Divergence Model

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 2 - The Deuteronomistic History

The second in the lecture series for the SVP OT Fall 2013 class.
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Deuteronomistic History, Pt 1

Gives an introduction and covers material from Joshua to time of King David.
(Recorded with

Lecture 11. On the Steps of Moab: Deuteronomy

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture, focusing on Moses's final address to the Israelites and transfer of authority to Joshua, describes Moses as the paradigmatic leader of biblical tradition. The structure of Deuteronomy is then outlined. Attention is given to updated and revised laws within Deuteronomy which exemplify the activity of adaptive interpretation of earlier tradition. The main themes of Deuteronomy are presented and include the notion of God's chosen people and chosen city, social justice, covenantal love and the centralization of cultic worship.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Moses as the Paradigmatic Leader of Biblical Tradition
08:46 - Chapter 2. Basic Structure of Deuteronomy
22:16 - Chapter 3. Updated and Revised Laws According to New Ideas
37:31 - Chapter 4. Major Themes in Deuteronomy

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 5. Critical Approaches to the Bible: Introduction to Genesis 12-50

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the modern critical study of the Bible, including source theories and Wellhausen's Documentary Hypothesis, as well as form criticism and tradition criticism. The main characteristics of each biblical source (J, E, P, and D) according to classic source theory are explained. This lecture also raises the question of the historical accuracy of the Bible and the relation of archaeology to the biblical record.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Wellhausen's Documentary Hypothesis and Characteristics of Biblical Sources
16:05 - Chapter 2. The Purpose of Literary, Source and Historical Criticism
27:15 - Chapter 3. The Generations of the Patriarchs and Matriarchs
34:42 - Chapter 4. Critical Methodology Used in Biblical Scholarship

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Lecture 20. Responses to Suffering and Evil: Lamentations and Wisdom Literature

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture begins with the Book of Lamentations, a short book of dirges that laments the destruction of Jerusalem and moves on to introduce the third and final section of the Hebrew Bible - the Ketuvim, or Writings. This section of the Bible contains three books that exemplify the ancient Near Eastern literary genre of Wisdom -- Proverbs, Job and Ecclesiastes. Proverbs reinforces the Deuteronomistic idea of divine retributive justice according to which the good prosper and the evil are punished. The conventional assumption of a moral world order is attacked in the Book of Job. The book explores whether people will sustain virtue when suffering and afflicted, and brings charges of negligence and mismanagement against God for failing to punish the wicked and allowing the righteous to suffer.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Lamentations
08:31 - Chapter 2. An Introduction to Wisdom Books in the Ketuvim
13:19 - Chapter 3. The Book of Proverbs
19:48 - Chapter 4. Structure of and Literary Components in The Book of Job
25:40 - Chapter 5. Prose Prologue in the Book of Job
30:36 - Chapter 6. Poetic Speech Cycles in the Book of Job
45:26 - Chapter 7. God's Response in the Book of Job

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 16. Literary Prophecy: Amos

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the literary prophets of both the northern and southern kingdoms. The prophetic books are anthologies of oracles the sequence of which is often determined by literary rather than chronological considerations. This lecture studies the literary features and major themes of classical Israelite prophecy as evidenced in particular in the book of the eighth-century northern prophet Amos. The prophets denounced moral decay and false piety as directly responsible for the social injustice that outrages God. While the Deuteronomist blames the nation's misfortunes on acts of idolatry, the prophets stress that the nation will be punished for everyday incidents of immorality. The literary prophets counterbalance their warnings with messages of great hope and consolation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. An Introduction to the Literary Prophets
05:32 - Chapter 2. Structure of and Literary Features in the Book of Amos
22:29 - Chapter 3. Major Themes in the Book of Amos
33:51 - Chapter 4. Differences between Deuteronomistic and Prophetic Interpretations of Israel's History

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 8. Exodus: From Egypt to Sinai (Exodus 5-24, 32; Numbers)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture traces the account of the Exodus (and the origin of the Passover festival as a historicization of older nature festivals) and Israel's liberation from bondage under Pharaoh. The story reaches its climax with the covenant concluded between God and Israel through Moses at Sinai. Drawing heavily on the work of Jon Levenson, the lecture examines Ancient Near Eastern parallels to the Sinaitic covenant and describes the divine-human relationship (an intersection of law and love) that the covenant seeks to express.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Passover as a Historicization of Earlier Ritual Practices
06:51 - Chapter 2. The Exodus as a Paradigm for Collective Salvation
19:59 - Chapter 3. The Mosaic Covenant between God and Israel at Sinai
39:15 - Chapter 4. Patience with the Israelites: Towards the Promised Land

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Kim Dissects the Bible | Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings

I continue my look at the Bible, this time looking at the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings, known by scholars as the Deuteronomic history (which also includes Deuteronomy)

Support me on patreon:

Lecture 9. The Priestly Legacy: Cult and Sacrifice, Purity and Holiness in Leviticus and Numbers

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, the Priestly source (P) found primarily in Leviticus and Numbers is introduced. The symbolism of the sacrificial cult and purity system, the differences between moral and ritual impurity, as well as holiness and purity are explained within the Priestly context. The concept of holiness and imitatio dei, or human imitation of God, is explained.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to the Israelite Sanctuary
09:19 - Chapter 2. The Priestly Conceptions of Holiness and Time
13:36 - Chapter 3. Holiness, Purity, Moral and Ritual Impurity
23:30 - Chapter 4. Ritual Purification, Sacrifices and Offerings, and Imitatio Dei
29:13 - Chapter 5. Moral Impurity, Defiling the Land and Purification
42:34 - Chapter 6. Dietary Law and the Holiness Code

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

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