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Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

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Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Overview

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to The Twelve (JSB pp. 1139-42)
(2) Introduction to Amos (JSB pp. 1176-7), Amos 1-9

Wilson, Robert R. Biblical Prophecy. In The Encyclopedia of Religion, 12:14-23
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13. Hebrew Bible Yale- Prophets and Kings

Tribes, Judges, Samuel, Saul, David.

Lecture 14. The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The tension between covenant theology, emphasizing the conditional Mosaic convenant from Mt. Sinai, and royal theology emphasizing the unconditional covenant with David in his palace on Mt. Zion, is traced. Following Solomon's death, the united kingdom separated into a northern and a southern kingdom (named Israel and Judah respectively), the former falling to the Assyrians in 722 and the latter to the Babylonians in 586. Analysis of the Deuteronomistic School's response to these historical crises and subsequent exile to Babylonia is evidenced through redaction criticism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Uncompromising Honesty of the Story of David
10:29 - Chapter 2. Tensions in Kings I and II
31:21 - Chapter 3. The Separation of the Kingdom Following Solomon's Death
42:10 - Chapter 4. Historiosophy of the Deuteronomistic School

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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The Gospel of Matthew - Authorship [FIXED]

This video shows evidence (title, internal evidence, external evidence) in favour of Matthew being the author of the Gospel of Matthew.

The Theodotus error at 4:46 was fixed.

The true Prophets have the same mindset as the ancient Prophets

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Lecture 17. Literary Prophecy: Hosea and Isaiah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The lecture focuses on the eighth-century northern prophet Hosea, a linguistically difficult book set against the backdrop of the expansionist Assyrian Empire. Hosea's marriage symbolizes Israel's relationship with God and serves to remind Israel of God's forbearance and Israel's obligations and pledge to loyalty under the covenant at Sinai. The second half of the lecture shifts to Isaiah and his emphasis on the Davidic Covenant, rather than the Mosaic one, a key distinction between him and Hosea. Themes in Isaiah include the salvation of a remnant, Israel's election to a mission and an eschatology that centers around a messiah (anointed) king of the house of David.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Historical Background for and Major Themes of the Book of Hosea
13:29 - Chapter 2. Doom and Hope as Two Conceptions of Covenant
18:00 - Chapter 3. Historical Background for and Structure of the Book of Isaiah
25:55 - Chapter 4. Emphasis on the Davidic Covenant
36:47 - Chapter 5. Major Themes in the Book of Isaiah

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 16. Literary Prophecy: Amos

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the literary prophets of both the northern and southern kingdoms. The prophetic books are anthologies of oracles the sequence of which is often determined by literary rather than chronological considerations. This lecture studies the literary features and major themes of classical Israelite prophecy as evidenced in particular in the book of the eighth-century northern prophet Amos. The prophets denounced moral decay and false piety as directly responsible for the social injustice that outrages God. While the Deuteronomist blames the nation's misfortunes on acts of idolatry, the prophets stress that the nation will be punished for everyday incidents of immorality. The literary prophets counterbalance their warnings with messages of great hope and consolation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. An Introduction to the Literary Prophets
05:32 - Chapter 2. Structure of and Literary Features in the Book of Amos
22:29 - Chapter 3. Major Themes in the Book of Amos
33:51 - Chapter 4. Differences between Deuteronomistic and Prophetic Interpretations of Israel's History

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 19. Literary Prophecy: Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The destruction of Jerusalem challenged the faith of the nation. What was the meaning of this event and how could such tremendous evil and suffering be reconciled with the nature of God himself? Professor Hayes shows how Israel's prophets attempted to answer this question, turning the nation's defeat and despair into an occasion for renewing faith in Israel's God. The lecture continues with an in-depth study of the book of Ezekiel. Ezekiel's denunciations of Jerusalem are among the most lurid and violent in the Bible and he concludes that destruction is the only possible remedy. Ezekiel's visions include God's withdrawal from Jerusalem to be with his people in exile, and his ultimate return. Ezekiel's use of dramatic prophetic signs, his rejection of collective divine punishment and assertion of individual responsibility are discussed. The last part of the lecture turns to Second Isaiah and the famous servant songs that find a universal significance in Israel's suffering.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure and Tone of the Book of Ezekiel
09:53 - Chapter 2. Ezekiel's Denunciations of Jerusalem and Rejection of Collective Punishment
17:54 - Chapter 3. The Sometimes Contradictory Nature of the Biblical Text
21:39 - Chapter 4. Ezekiel's Interpretation of the Final Destruction of Jerusalem
31:58 - Chapter 5.Major Themes in Second Isaiah
38:00 - Chapter 6. Second Isaiah's Servant Songs

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Old Testament Survey Lesson 5 The Prophets/Prophecy

General survey of the Old Testament lesson 5 on the Prophets or books of prophecy. More information at
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Studies in the Non-Writing Prophets

To buy a physical copy:
To buy a Kindle eBook copy: goo.gl/iphUnJ

Lecture 18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure of the Book of Micah
05:26 - Chapter 2. Common Paradoxes in Prophetic Writings
10:40 - Chapter 3. The Book of Zephaniah
14:37 - Chapter 4. The Book of Nahum
19:46 - Chapter 5. The Book of Habakkuk
24:52 - Chapter 6. Structure and Features of the Book of Jeremiah
39:11 - Chapter 7. Unique Features of Jeremiah's Message of Consolation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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4. The Prophets | Journey through the Old Testament


The grand finale of the Old Testament are the last seventeen books. These books deal with the prophets, men spoke through God to the people. Join Johnny Ramsey in this video as he presents a lesson about these Bible books.

Message of the Prophets online course, taught by J. Daniel Hays

Learn more:

When you complete this course, you will gain:

- familiarity with the genre of Old Testament prophecy
- insight into the theological themes of each prophetic book in the Old Testament
- a greater grasp of how to apply the messages of prophetic literature today

Prophets and Prophecy in Ancient Israel

A lecture focused primarily on the phenomenon of prophecy in ancient Israel and some of the 8th century BCE prophets, with discussion as well of the way the New Testament makes use of those works. By Dr. James F. McGrath, Clarence L. Goodwin Chair in New Testament Language and Literature at Butler University.
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The Hebrew Prophets

A lecture by Dr. James F. McGrath of Butler University about prophets and prophecy in the Bible.

6. Hebrew Bible Yale- History or not? (Patriarchs)

Lecture 23. Visions of the End: Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The Book of Ruth, in which a foreign woman enters the community of Israel and becomes great-grandmother to none other than King David, expresses a view of gentiles entirely opposed to that of Ezra and Nehemiah. Other prophets of the Restoration period are discussed, including Third Isaiah who also envisions other nations joining Israel in the worship of Yahweh. This period also sees the rise of apocalyptic literature in works like Zechariah, Joel and Daniel. Written during a period of persecution in the 2nd c. BCE the book of Daniel contains many features and themes of apocalyptic literature, including an eschatology according to which God dramatically intervenes in human history, destroying the wicked (understood as other nations) and saving the righteous (understood as Israel).

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Ruth
11:58 - Chapter 2. The Last Prophetic Books
23:05 - Chapter 3. Features of Apocalyptic Literature
29:11 - Chapter 4. Apocalyptic Passages in Post-Exilic Books
35:21 - Chapter 5. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 1-6
42:36 - Chapter 6. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 7-12

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 2. The Hebrew Bible in Its Ancient Near Eastern Setting: Biblical Religion in Context

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, the Hebrew Bible is understood against the background of Ancient Near Eastern culture. Drawing from and critiquing the work of Yehezkel Kaufmann, the lecture compares the religion of the Hebrew Bible with the cultures of the Ancient Near East. Two models of development are discussed: an evolutionary model of development in which the Hebrew Bible is continuous with Ancient Near Eastern culture and a revolutionary model of development in which the Israelite religion is radically discontinuous with Ancient Near Eastern culture. At stake in this debate is whether the religion of the Hebrew Bible is really the religion of ancient Israel.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Bible as a Product of Religious and Cultural Revolution
08:16 - Chapter 2. Kaufman's Characterization of Pagan Religion
22:16 - Chapter 3. Kaufman's Characterization of One Sovereign God
35:13 - Chapter 4. Continuity or Radical Break?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Dual Lesson # 1- Hebrew And Prophecy

Hosea 14:1-2
Joel 2:12-13/2:32
Isaiah 10:20-22
Zephaniah 2:1-3

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