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Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

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Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Overview

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to The Twelve (JSB pp. 1139-42)
(2) Introduction to Amos (JSB pp. 1176-7), Amos 1-9

Wilson, Robert R. Biblical Prophecy. In The Encyclopedia of Religion, 12:14-23
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Lecture 16. Literary Prophecy: Amos

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the literary prophets of both the northern and southern kingdoms. The prophetic books are anthologies of oracles the sequence of which is often determined by literary rather than chronological considerations. This lecture studies the literary features and major themes of classical Israelite prophecy as evidenced in particular in the book of the eighth-century northern prophet Amos. The prophets denounced moral decay and false piety as directly responsible for the social injustice that outrages God. While the Deuteronomist blames the nation's misfortunes on acts of idolatry, the prophets stress that the nation will be punished for everyday incidents of immorality. The literary prophets counterbalance their warnings with messages of great hope and consolation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. An Introduction to the Literary Prophets
05:32 - Chapter 2. Structure of and Literary Features in the Book of Amos
22:29 - Chapter 3. Major Themes in the Book of Amos
33:51 - Chapter 4. Differences between Deuteronomistic and Prophetic Interpretations of Israel's History

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 17. Literary Prophecy: Hosea and Isaiah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The lecture focuses on the eighth-century northern prophet Hosea, a linguistically difficult book set against the backdrop of the expansionist Assyrian Empire. Hosea's marriage symbolizes Israel's relationship with God and serves to remind Israel of God's forbearance and Israel's obligations and pledge to loyalty under the covenant at Sinai. The second half of the lecture shifts to Isaiah and his emphasis on the Davidic Covenant, rather than the Mosaic one, a key distinction between him and Hosea. Themes in Isaiah include the salvation of a remnant, Israel's election to a mission and an eschatology that centers around a messiah (anointed) king of the house of David.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Historical Background for and Major Themes of the Book of Hosea
13:29 - Chapter 2. Doom and Hope as Two Conceptions of Covenant
18:00 - Chapter 3. Historical Background for and Structure of the Book of Isaiah
25:55 - Chapter 4. Emphasis on the Davidic Covenant
36:47 - Chapter 5. Major Themes in the Book of Isaiah

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Lecture 19. Literary Prophecy: Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The destruction of Jerusalem challenged the faith of the nation. What was the meaning of this event and how could such tremendous evil and suffering be reconciled with the nature of God himself? Professor Hayes shows how Israel's prophets attempted to answer this question, turning the nation's defeat and despair into an occasion for renewing faith in Israel's God. The lecture continues with an in-depth study of the book of Ezekiel. Ezekiel's denunciations of Jerusalem are among the most lurid and violent in the Bible and he concludes that destruction is the only possible remedy. Ezekiel's visions include God's withdrawal from Jerusalem to be with his people in exile, and his ultimate return. Ezekiel's use of dramatic prophetic signs, his rejection of collective divine punishment and assertion of individual responsibility are discussed. The last part of the lecture turns to Second Isaiah and the famous servant songs that find a universal significance in Israel's suffering.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure and Tone of the Book of Ezekiel
09:53 - Chapter 2. Ezekiel's Denunciations of Jerusalem and Rejection of Collective Punishment
17:54 - Chapter 3. The Sometimes Contradictory Nature of the Biblical Text
21:39 - Chapter 4. Ezekiel's Interpretation of the Final Destruction of Jerusalem
31:58 - Chapter 5.Major Themes in Second Isaiah
38:00 - Chapter 6. Second Isaiah's Servant Songs

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

7. The Prophets | Biblical Timeline


During the course of Israelite history, God sent men to help guide and direct the nation. These men were prophets, bringing messages directly from God. In this lesson, John Hall discusses many of the prophets we read about in the Old Testament and places them on the “Biblical Timeline.”
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Lecture 18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure of the Book of Micah
05:26 - Chapter 2. Common Paradoxes in Prophetic Writings
10:40 - Chapter 3. The Book of Zephaniah
14:37 - Chapter 4. The Book of Nahum
19:46 - Chapter 5. The Book of Habakkuk
24:52 - Chapter 6. Structure and Features of the Book of Jeremiah
39:11 - Chapter 7. Unique Features of Jeremiah's Message of Consolation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

The Hebrew Prophets

A lecture by Dr. James F. McGrath of Butler University about prophets and prophecy in the Bible.

Prophets and Prophecy in Ancient Israel

A lecture focused primarily on the phenomenon of prophecy in ancient Israel and some of the 8th century BCE prophets, with discussion as well of the way the New Testament makes use of those works. By Dr. James F. McGrath, Clarence L. Goodwin Chair in New Testament Language and Literature at Butler University.

Prophets and Prophecy in Ancient Israel

A lower quality version of the video of the lecture previously made available, but including all slides.
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The Message of the Prophets Video Lectures, Chapter 5: The Prophets and Biblical Eschatology

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Selected from The Message of the Prophets Video Lectures, this video presents all material from Chapter 5: The Prophets and Biblical Eschatology.

Check out an online course for independent learners based on The Message of the Prophets Video Lectures and the corresponding textbook,

About The Message of the Prophets Video Lectures:

The Message of the Prophets Video Lectures features 27 lessons (on 3 DVDs), offering a scholarly yet student-friendly survey of the Old Testament prophetic literature that presents the message of each prophet in its historical and biblical context and then tracks that message through the New Testament to challenge readers with what it means for them today. Old Testament scholar J. Daniel Hays focuses on synthesizing the message of the prophets, which enables students to grasp the major contours of the prophetic books clearly and concisely. After identifying what the message meant for ancient Israel, Hays helps viewers move toward application today, enabling students to gain a better understanding of God and the relationship between God and his people.

Focused on the most significant topics and discussions in the textbook, The Message of the Prophets Video Lectures is designed with the learner in mind. Each lecture is approximately 20 minutes. These lectures are an indispensable resource for students and independent learners alike.

Lecture 13. The Deuteronomistic History: Prophets and Kings (1 and 2 Samuel)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The transition from a tribal society under the leadership of elders and eventually charismatic judges to a nation under a monarch is traced through the books of Judges and 1 and 2 Samuel. Early stories of local heroes are woven together into a larger history that conforms to the exilic perspectives of the Deuteronomistic School. An extended look at representations of Saul and David (including God's covenant with David) reveal historical shifts and some ambivalence about monarchy and the ideal form of leadership.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Distinguishing between Israelis and Israelites
01:53 - Chapter 2. An Alliance of Tribes
05:46 - Chapter 3. The Book of Judges
23:05 - Chapter 4. Samuel, a Transition Figure and the Last in a Line of Prophet Judges
32:46 - Chapter 5. Saul and David as Representations of Ambivalence about Monarchy
45:14 - Chapter 6. The Davidic Covenant

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Has Prophecy Returned to the Jewish People?

A synopsis of a eye opening talk from the Lubavicher Rebbe in the summer of 5751/1991 Watch Rabbi Reuven Wolf Live @ Maayon Yisroel!





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Rabbi Reuven Wolf is a world renowned educator and lecturer who has devoted his life to reaching out and rekindling the spirit of Judaism in his fellow Jews. Recognized as an inspiring and thought provoking lecturer, he has cultivated a unique talent to communicate deep and complex mystical ideas in a manner that is both compelling and applicable to the greater public, and his lessons are charged with an enthusiasm and vigor that impacts listeners both intellectually and emotionally. Rabbi Wolf was raised in the Ropshetz Chassidic dynasty, educated in the Belz and Bluzhev Yeshivos, and later, in the famous Lithuanian schools of Slabodkea and Mir. He is profoundly influenced by Jewish Mysticism and Kabbalah, and particularly Chabad Chassidic philosophy.

Since 1995, Rabbi Wolf has been teaching students of all ages, from elementary school children to adults, and has lectured across North America. Maayon Yisroel was founded in 2006 by Rabbi Wolf and Haki Abhesera, as a center to fulfill the vision of spreading the profound mystical teachings of Chassidic Judaism.

The name Maayon Yisroel, which means wellsprings of Israel, is indicative of our mission to enrich and inspire the Jewish people with the deep, mystical teachings of the Baal Shem Tov and other Chassidic masters.

Rabbi Yisroel Baal Shem Tov, a 16th century Jewish mystic, was renowned for his unconditional love for the Jewish People, who worked to bring together Jews of all types to be inspired and nurtured in their appreciation of and relationship with G-d.

Through principles derived from his teachings, we aim to follow in the noble tradition of rejuvenating Yiddishkeit by showing how mystical ideas can be applied to modern life. These concepts which until now, have been largely inaccessible to the English-speaking public, have the power to provide the spirituality that Jews today complain is so often lacking in their experience of Judaism, as a mechanical and technical series of laws.

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Hermeneutics 7: Prophetic and Apocalyptic Literature

In this session Pastor Ryan Habbena discusses interpreting prophetic and apocalyptic Scripture. The millennial views are also discussed.
You can download the handouts and find links to the articles that are referenced here:

Intro to Prophetic Literature: Isaiah

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Was Malachi an Angel?

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Rabbi Dr. David Moster is the director of BiblicalCulture.org. His field of study is the Hebrew Bible and its interpretation. He is a fellow at the Center for Israel Studies at Yeshiva University and is the author of Etrog: How a Chinese Fruit Became a Jewish Symbol.

NON MESSIANIC ATTACKS PAUL & CHRIST (LIVE DEBATE)

Deaconsicarii.com

Hebrew Poetry Parallelism

Dr. Brian D. Russell (Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies) presents a brief introduction to the use of parallelism in Hebrew poetry.

Divided Monarchy and the Fall of Jerusalem

Video #8 for Old Testament/Hebrew Scriptures

Lecture 14. The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The tension between covenant theology, emphasizing the conditional Mosaic convenant from Mt. Sinai, and royal theology emphasizing the unconditional covenant with David in his palace on Mt. Zion, is traced. Following Solomon's death, the united kingdom separated into a northern and a southern kingdom (named Israel and Judah respectively), the former falling to the Assyrians in 722 and the latter to the Babylonians in 586. Analysis of the Deuteronomistic School's response to these historical crises and subsequent exile to Babylonia is evidenced through redaction criticism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Uncompromising Honesty of the Story of David
10:29 - Chapter 2. Tensions in Kings I and II
31:21 - Chapter 3. The Separation of the Kingdom Following Solomon's Death
42:10 - Chapter 4. Historiosophy of the Deuteronomistic School

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

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