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Lecture 18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

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Lecture 18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure of the Book of Micah
05:26 - Chapter 2. Common Paradoxes in Prophetic Writings
10:40 - Chapter 3. The Book of Zephaniah
14:37 - Chapter 4. The Book of Nahum
19:46 - Chapter 5. The Book of Habakkuk
24:52 - Chapter 6. Structure and Features of the Book of Jeremiah
39:11 - Chapter 7. Unique Features of Jeremiah's Message of Consolation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

Overview

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Micah (JSB pp. 1205-6), Micah 1-7
(2) Introduction to Nahum (JSB pp. 1219-20), Nahum 1-3
(3) Introduction to Habbakuk (JSB pp. 1226-7), Habbakuk 1-3
(4) Introduction to Zephaniah (JSB pp. 1234-5), Zephaniah 1-3
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Lecture 17. Literary Prophecy: Hosea and Isaiah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The lecture focuses on the eighth-century northern prophet Hosea, a linguistically difficult book set against the backdrop of the expansionist Assyrian Empire. Hosea's marriage symbolizes Israel's relationship with God and serves to remind Israel of God's forbearance and Israel's obligations and pledge to loyalty under the covenant at Sinai. The second half of the lecture shifts to Isaiah and his emphasis on the Davidic Covenant, rather than the Mosaic one, a key distinction between him and Hosea. Themes in Isaiah include the salvation of a remnant, Israel's election to a mission and an eschatology that centers around a messiah (anointed) king of the house of David.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Historical Background for and Major Themes of the Book of Hosea
13:29 - Chapter 2. Doom and Hope as Two Conceptions of Covenant
18:00 - Chapter 3. Historical Background for and Structure of the Book of Isaiah
25:55 - Chapter 4. Emphasis on the Davidic Covenant
36:47 - Chapter 5. Major Themes in the Book of Isaiah

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 19. Literary Prophecy: Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The destruction of Jerusalem challenged the faith of the nation. What was the meaning of this event and how could such tremendous evil and suffering be reconciled with the nature of God himself? Professor Hayes shows how Israel's prophets attempted to answer this question, turning the nation's defeat and despair into an occasion for renewing faith in Israel's God. The lecture continues with an in-depth study of the book of Ezekiel. Ezekiel's denunciations of Jerusalem are among the most lurid and violent in the Bible and he concludes that destruction is the only possible remedy. Ezekiel's visions include God's withdrawal from Jerusalem to be with his people in exile, and his ultimate return. Ezekiel's use of dramatic prophetic signs, his rejection of collective divine punishment and assertion of individual responsibility are discussed. The last part of the lecture turns to Second Isaiah and the famous servant songs that find a universal significance in Israel's suffering.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure and Tone of the Book of Ezekiel
09:53 - Chapter 2. Ezekiel's Denunciations of Jerusalem and Rejection of Collective Punishment
17:54 - Chapter 3. The Sometimes Contradictory Nature of the Biblical Text
21:39 - Chapter 4. Ezekiel's Interpretation of the Final Destruction of Jerusalem
31:58 - Chapter 5.Major Themes in Second Isaiah
38:00 - Chapter 6. Second Isaiah's Servant Songs

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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The Books of Nahum, Zephaniah, and Habakkuk

Discussions on the Old Testament
The Books of Nahum, Zephaniah, and Habakkuk
Originally aired: 2/27/2006
Nahum 1-Zeph. 3

Lecture 16. Literary Prophecy: Amos

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the literary prophets of both the northern and southern kingdoms. The prophetic books are anthologies of oracles the sequence of which is often determined by literary rather than chronological considerations. This lecture studies the literary features and major themes of classical Israelite prophecy as evidenced in particular in the book of the eighth-century northern prophet Amos. The prophets denounced moral decay and false piety as directly responsible for the social injustice that outrages God. While the Deuteronomist blames the nation's misfortunes on acts of idolatry, the prophets stress that the nation will be punished for everyday incidents of immorality. The literary prophets counterbalance their warnings with messages of great hope and consolation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. An Introduction to the Literary Prophets
05:32 - Chapter 2. Structure of and Literary Features in the Book of Amos
22:29 - Chapter 3. Major Themes in the Book of Amos
33:51 - Chapter 4. Differences between Deuteronomistic and Prophetic Interpretations of Israel's History

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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e-Bible (Lesson 31) Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah

Join Fred and Valerie Paine as they highlight 3 more books from the Minor Prophets: Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah. A common theme of these books includes the principle of Sowing and Reaping - if you plant seeds of disobedience, you will harvest an evil crop. If you sow seeds of obedience to God, you will harvest a good crop. The just shall live be faith - what is faith? Listen to the lesson to learn the answer.

Lecture 12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the study of Deuteronomy and traces the contribution of the Deuteronomistic School: a historiosophy according to which Israel's fortunes are dependent upon and an indicator of her fidelity to the covenant. The books of the Former Prophets are introduced with attention to their historical and geographical context. The book of Joshua's account of Israel's conquest of Canaan is contrasted with scholarly accounts of Israel's emergence in Canaan and formation as a nation state.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Deuteronomy: A Capstone to the Pentateuchal Narrative
06:05 - Chapter 2. Source Theory and the Pentateuch
13:26 - Chapter 3. Introduction to the Former Prophets
21:54 - Chapter 4. Geographical Setting and Its Historical Implications
27:39 - Chapter 5. Structure of Joshua
34:29 - Chapter 6. Three Scholarly Models for the Emergence of the Nation State of Israel

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

17. Literary Prophecy: Hosea and Isaiah Overview

Overview

The lecture focuses on the eighth-century northern prophet Hosea, a linguistically difficult book set against the backdrop of the expansionist Assyrian Empire. Hosea's marriage symbolizes Israel's relationship with God and serves to remind Israel of God's forbearance and Israel's obligations and pledge to loyalty under the covenant at Sinai. The second half of the lecture shifts to Isaiah and his emphasis on the Davidic Covenant, rather than the Mosaic one, a key distinction between him and Hosea. Themes in Isaiah include the salvation of a remnant, Israel's election to a mission and an eschatology that centers around a messiah (anointed) king of the house of David.

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Hosea (JSB pp. 1143-4), Hosea 1-14
(2) Introduction to Isaiah (JSB pp. 780-784), Isaiah 1-12, 28-33, 36-39
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Lecture 14. The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The tension between covenant theology, emphasizing the conditional Mosaic convenant from Mt. Sinai, and royal theology emphasizing the unconditional covenant with David in his palace on Mt. Zion, is traced. Following Solomon's death, the united kingdom separated into a northern and a southern kingdom (named Israel and Judah respectively), the former falling to the Assyrians in 722 and the latter to the Babylonians in 586. Analysis of the Deuteronomistic School's response to these historical crises and subsequent exile to Babylonia is evidenced through redaction criticism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Uncompromising Honesty of the Story of David
10:29 - Chapter 2. Tensions in Kings I and II
31:21 - Chapter 3. The Separation of the Kingdom Following Solomon's Death
42:10 - Chapter 4. Historiosophy of the Deuteronomistic School

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

The Minor Prophets: Micah - Who is Like the LORD?

The prophet Micah delivers grim warnings, and forecasts war and punishment to those who will not obey. He focuses on sin and the destruction it brings. Yet, despite the impending doom, Micah also predicts deliverance and peace. How does his message of utter despair contrasted with joyful hope and the promise of restoration, apply to us today? In this study we’ll examine these ideas in relation to the question, “Who is like the LORD?”
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Watch Archived Videos:
The Minor Prophets Bible study series

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Lecture 5. Critical Approaches to the Bible: Introduction to Genesis 12-50

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the modern critical study of the Bible, including source theories and Wellhausen's Documentary Hypothesis, as well as form criticism and tradition criticism. The main characteristics of each biblical source (J, E, P, and D) according to classic source theory are explained. This lecture also raises the question of the historical accuracy of the Bible and the relation of archaeology to the biblical record.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Wellhausen's Documentary Hypothesis and Characteristics of Biblical Sources
16:05 - Chapter 2. The Purpose of Literary, Source and Historical Criticism
27:15 - Chapter 3. The Generations of the Patriarchs and Matriarchs
34:42 - Chapter 4. Critical Methodology Used in Biblical Scholarship

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 13. The Deuteronomistic History: Prophets and Kings (1 and 2 Samuel)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The transition from a tribal society under the leadership of elders and eventually charismatic judges to a nation under a monarch is traced through the books of Judges and 1 and 2 Samuel. Early stories of local heroes are woven together into a larger history that conforms to the exilic perspectives of the Deuteronomistic School. An extended look at representations of Saul and David (including God's covenant with David) reveal historical shifts and some ambivalence about monarchy and the ideal form of leadership.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Distinguishing between Israelis and Israelites
01:53 - Chapter 2. An Alliance of Tribes
05:46 - Chapter 3. The Book of Judges
23:05 - Chapter 4. Samuel, a Transition Figure and the Last in a Line of Prophet Judges
32:46 - Chapter 5. Saul and David as Representations of Ambivalence about Monarchy
45:14 - Chapter 6. The Davidic Covenant

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Through the Bible in a year – JONAH MICAH NAHUM HABAKKUK

This study through the minor prophets, taught by Pastor Barry Forder, is the 30th session of 48 in our ‘Through-the-Bible-in-a-Year’ series recorded during 2014 as part of our Sunday morning family services.

In this session, Pastor Barry gives an overview of Jonah, Micah, Nahum and Habakkuk.

As most are aware, Jonah was called to speak to the people of the great Assyrian city of Nineveh. At first he decided he didn’t want the assignment, until God explained it to him a little more clearly (with the help of a great fish!). Note: you cannot run away from God! As has been said: “You cannot say ‘No Lord’, and mean both words; one annuls the other. If you say no to Him, then He is not your Lord”.

Micah spoke to Israel of God’s coming judgment, largely on account of their oppression of the poor in the land, and then contrasted this with the way it will be when the Messiah reigns. Yet there is no gloating from Micah, as we see him lamenting over his nation, before concluding with the hope of restoration.

Nahum foretold the judgment of Nineveh. Even though they had repented at the preaching of Jonah, they had retuned to their ungodly and idolatrous ways, God is not mocked.

Habakkuk’s complaint in the opening verses is ‘why do the unrighteous prosper in Israel?’ God explains that it is because of this that he will cause the Babylonian’s to come to bring judgment! Habakkuk questions God’s plan and God then allows Habakkuk to see just how sin looks from His perspective!

These four books help us to see as God sees. Sin is abhorrent to a holy God. A price must be paid, and that price is death. Back in the Garden of Eden God established the rules, if you sin the punishment is death. But there is hope! For if one could be found who was willing to die in your place, God’s justice would be satisfied. But who would be willing to pay for your sin? Who would be actually worthy to do it, for they themselves would have to be without sin?

May this overview prompt you to undertake your own study of these divinely inspired books.

You can download the PDF slides are from the PowerPoint presentation used during the teaching session at
You can listen to the audio on this web page, or save it for later listening at
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About the Book of, and the Prophet, MICAH

The Book of Micah shows us that God often uses the seemingly insignificant people of this world to do much of His significant bidding. I hope this encourages and inspires you!

The Minor Prophets: Zephaniah - Hidden of the Lord

Zephaniah predicts that God has bigger plans than the end of the world. The Day of the Lord is at hand, a terrible day for those who have rebelled. It won’t stop at Judah—the whole world will be punished. Zephaniah’s message was not just for ancient Judah but also for our day. Doom is eminent but Zephaniah’s message also includes God’s restoration of all things to a world of peace and joy.
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Watch Archived Videos:
The Minor Prophets Bible study series

========
Subscribe Beyond Today Email

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The Micah Prophecy

The Key to Revelation 12

Book of Micah

Introduction to Nahum

Dr. George Guthrie, General Editor of Explore the Bible's study of the Minor Prophets introduces the book of Nahum. Find out more about Explore the Bible, the only book-by-book Bible study for groups of all ages and even preview 4 FREE sessions at

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