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Lecture 18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

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Lecture 18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure of the Book of Micah
05:26 - Chapter 2. Common Paradoxes in Prophetic Writings
10:40 - Chapter 3. The Book of Zephaniah
14:37 - Chapter 4. The Book of Nahum
19:46 - Chapter 5. The Book of Habakkuk
24:52 - Chapter 6. Structure and Features of the Book of Jeremiah
39:11 - Chapter 7. Unique Features of Jeremiah's Message of Consolation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

Overview

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Micah (JSB pp. 1205-6), Micah 1-7
(2) Introduction to Nahum (JSB pp. 1219-20), Nahum 1-3
(3) Introduction to Habbakuk (JSB pp. 1226-7), Habbakuk 1-3
(4) Introduction to Zephaniah (JSB pp. 1234-5), Zephaniah 1-3
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Lecture 19. Literary Prophecy: Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The destruction of Jerusalem challenged the faith of the nation. What was the meaning of this event and how could such tremendous evil and suffering be reconciled with the nature of God himself? Professor Hayes shows how Israel's prophets attempted to answer this question, turning the nation's defeat and despair into an occasion for renewing faith in Israel's God. The lecture continues with an in-depth study of the book of Ezekiel. Ezekiel's denunciations of Jerusalem are among the most lurid and violent in the Bible and he concludes that destruction is the only possible remedy. Ezekiel's visions include God's withdrawal from Jerusalem to be with his people in exile, and his ultimate return. Ezekiel's use of dramatic prophetic signs, his rejection of collective divine punishment and assertion of individual responsibility are discussed. The last part of the lecture turns to Second Isaiah and the famous servant songs that find a universal significance in Israel's suffering.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure and Tone of the Book of Ezekiel
09:53 - Chapter 2. Ezekiel's Denunciations of Jerusalem and Rejection of Collective Punishment
17:54 - Chapter 3. The Sometimes Contradictory Nature of the Biblical Text
21:39 - Chapter 4. Ezekiel's Interpretation of the Final Destruction of Jerusalem
31:58 - Chapter 5.Major Themes in Second Isaiah
38:00 - Chapter 6. Second Isaiah's Servant Songs

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

The Books of Nahum, Zephaniah, and Habakkuk

Discussions on the Old Testament
The Books of Nahum, Zephaniah, and Habakkuk
Originally aired: 2/27/2006
Nahum 1-Zeph. 3
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e-Bible (Lesson 31) Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah

Join Fred and Valerie Paine as they highlight 3 more books from the Minor Prophets: Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah. A common theme of these books includes the principle of Sowing and Reaping - if you plant seeds of disobedience, you will harvest an evil crop. If you sow seeds of obedience to God, you will harvest a good crop. The just shall live be faith - what is faith? Listen to the lesson to learn the answer.

Lecture 16. Literary Prophecy: Amos

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the literary prophets of both the northern and southern kingdoms. The prophetic books are anthologies of oracles the sequence of which is often determined by literary rather than chronological considerations. This lecture studies the literary features and major themes of classical Israelite prophecy as evidenced in particular in the book of the eighth-century northern prophet Amos. The prophets denounced moral decay and false piety as directly responsible for the social injustice that outrages God. While the Deuteronomist blames the nation's misfortunes on acts of idolatry, the prophets stress that the nation will be punished for everyday incidents of immorality. The literary prophets counterbalance their warnings with messages of great hope and consolation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. An Introduction to the Literary Prophets
05:32 - Chapter 2. Structure of and Literary Features in the Book of Amos
22:29 - Chapter 3. Major Themes in the Book of Amos
33:51 - Chapter 4. Differences between Deuteronomistic and Prophetic Interpretations of Israel's History

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 17. Literary Prophecy: Hosea and Isaiah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The lecture focuses on the eighth-century northern prophet Hosea, a linguistically difficult book set against the backdrop of the expansionist Assyrian Empire. Hosea's marriage symbolizes Israel's relationship with God and serves to remind Israel of God's forbearance and Israel's obligations and pledge to loyalty under the covenant at Sinai. The second half of the lecture shifts to Isaiah and his emphasis on the Davidic Covenant, rather than the Mosaic one, a key distinction between him and Hosea. Themes in Isaiah include the salvation of a remnant, Israel's election to a mission and an eschatology that centers around a messiah (anointed) king of the house of David.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Historical Background for and Major Themes of the Book of Hosea
13:29 - Chapter 2. Doom and Hope as Two Conceptions of Covenant
18:00 - Chapter 3. Historical Background for and Structure of the Book of Isaiah
25:55 - Chapter 4. Emphasis on the Davidic Covenant
36:47 - Chapter 5. Major Themes in the Book of Isaiah

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 11. On the Steps of Moab: Deuteronomy

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture, focusing on Moses's final address to the Israelites and transfer of authority to Joshua, describes Moses as the paradigmatic leader of biblical tradition. The structure of Deuteronomy is then outlined. Attention is given to updated and revised laws within Deuteronomy which exemplify the activity of adaptive interpretation of earlier tradition. The main themes of Deuteronomy are presented and include the notion of God's chosen people and chosen city, social justice, covenantal love and the centralization of cultic worship.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Moses as the Paradigmatic Leader of Biblical Tradition
08:46 - Chapter 2. Basic Structure of Deuteronomy
22:16 - Chapter 3. Updated and Revised Laws According to New Ideas
37:31 - Chapter 4. Major Themes in Deuteronomy

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 13. The Deuteronomistic History: Prophets and Kings (1 and 2 Samuel)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The transition from a tribal society under the leadership of elders and eventually charismatic judges to a nation under a monarch is traced through the books of Judges and 1 and 2 Samuel. Early stories of local heroes are woven together into a larger history that conforms to the exilic perspectives of the Deuteronomistic School. An extended look at representations of Saul and David (including God's covenant with David) reveal historical shifts and some ambivalence about monarchy and the ideal form of leadership.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Distinguishing between Israelis and Israelites
01:53 - Chapter 2. An Alliance of Tribes
05:46 - Chapter 3. The Book of Judges
23:05 - Chapter 4. Samuel, a Transition Figure and the Last in a Line of Prophet Judges
32:46 - Chapter 5. Saul and David as Representations of Ambivalence about Monarchy
45:14 - Chapter 6. The Davidic Covenant

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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About the Book of, and the Prophet, MICAH

The Book of Micah shows us that God often uses the seemingly insignificant people of this world to do much of His significant bidding. I hope this encourages and inspires you!

Lecture 20. Responses to Suffering and Evil: Lamentations and Wisdom Literature

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture begins with the Book of Lamentations, a short book of dirges that laments the destruction of Jerusalem and moves on to introduce the third and final section of the Hebrew Bible - the Ketuvim, or Writings. This section of the Bible contains three books that exemplify the ancient Near Eastern literary genre of Wisdom -- Proverbs, Job and Ecclesiastes. Proverbs reinforces the Deuteronomistic idea of divine retributive justice according to which the good prosper and the evil are punished. The conventional assumption of a moral world order is attacked in the Book of Job. The book explores whether people will sustain virtue when suffering and afflicted, and brings charges of negligence and mismanagement against God for failing to punish the wicked and allowing the righteous to suffer.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Lamentations
08:31 - Chapter 2. An Introduction to Wisdom Books in the Ketuvim
13:19 - Chapter 3. The Book of Proverbs
19:48 - Chapter 4. Structure of and Literary Components in The Book of Job
25:40 - Chapter 5. Prose Prologue in the Book of Job
30:36 - Chapter 6. Poetic Speech Cycles in the Book of Job
45:26 - Chapter 7. God's Response in the Book of Job

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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One Hour. One Book: Micah

You've heard sermons from it. You may have even read it for yourself. But what is the point of Micah? One Hour One Book are lectures taught by Dr. Randall Smith that overview each book in the Bible. Why? So you can be better equipped to understand and be changed by all 66 of them.

Check out all the videos in the One Hour. One Book. series using this handy YouTube playlist. And don't forget to subscribe!
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Written and presented by Dr. Randall D. Smith. Resource materials and notes are available at

Video produced, shot and edited by Benjamin Russell. benjaminrussell.wordpress.com

Made possible by the generous contributions of the Grace Church of Sebring family ( as well as Naas and Marina le Roux of Kerugma Production, Capetown, South Africa (

Music by Kirsten Melrose Nickisch. Tracks Where Is Your Heart and I'm Coming Back from her album The Coming Glory are available for on iTunes.

Set design by Meredith Seymour and provided by Grace Church of Sebring

Mics provided by Gabriel Colladay

Footage shot with Sony HVR-V1U in full HD thanks to the generosity of Naas and Marina le Roux of Kerugma Productions, Capetown, South Africa

Edited using Edius 6.0
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GCBI is a one year Bible program designed to give students the tools and knowledge required to understand the Bible and form a Biblical worldview, with the goal of following Jesus' last command to make disciples of all nations. For more information on how to get involved with the ministry, or to submit an application to become a student, visit One Year. One Book. One Goal. Make Disciples!

Grace Church of Sebring is a congregation in beautiful Sebring, FL, and a member of the Fellowship of Grace Brethren Churches. For more information, visit

Habakkuk, Zephaniah, and Haggai

The Between the Trees study on the books of Habakkuk, Zephaniah and Haggai

An overview of the Prophet Zephaniah

The prophet Zephaniah. Hope this overview helps you as you study.

Want a free Bible overview .pdf study tool ? - click here and I'll send it to your email -

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Teaching through the Psalms -
100 Awesome Things About God -
Full Sermons -
Full Bible Walkthrough -
What's God Teaching You? (interview series) -

Join us on these journeys :)

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Edited and Animated by Katie Beck and Austin Deneroy

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Instagram - @iamlandonmacdonald
Website -
Email - landonmacdonald1988@gmail.com
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One Hour. One Book: Zephaniah

GCBI is a one year Bible program designed to give students the tools and knowledge required to understand the Bible and form a Biblical worldview, with the goal of following Jesus' last command to make disciples of all nations. For more information on how to get involved with the ministry, or to submit an application to become a student, visit

One Year. One Book. One Goal. Make Disciples!

[BBST 392] The Prophet Micah - David Talley

BBST 392: Minor Prophets
The Prophet Micah
October 29, 2012

Lecture 22. The Restoration: 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra and Nehemiah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture continues the discussion of the psalms, and the genres and forms in which they appear, such as psalms of praise and thanksgiving, divine kingship, lament and petition, blessing and cursing, or wisdom. Another poetic book of the Bible is the Song of Songs, an erotic work the sexually explicit content of which has been piously reinterpreted over the centuries. The second half of the lecture turns to the period of the Restoration when the Judean exiles returned to what was now the province of Yehud under Cyrus, the Persian ruler. The books of 1 and 2 Chronicles refer to some of the events of this time as well as the books of Ezra and Nehemiah. Ezra and Nehemiah are said to renew the Mosaic covenant with the Torah at its center, and to institute a number of social and religious reforms (including a universal ban on intermarriage that will ultimately fail) in order to consolidate the struggling community.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Additional Forms and Genres in the Book of Psalms
10:30 - Chapter 2. Song of Songs
14:38 - Chapter 3. The Restoration and the Books of Chronicles I and II, Ezra and Nehemiah
30:10 - Chapter 4. Ezra's Dissolution of Foreign Marriages and Renewal of the Covenant
42:29 - Chapter 5. The Calamities as Cautionary Tales in the Books of Ezra and Nehemiah

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Dr. Gary Yates, Book of the Twelve [Minor Prophets], Lecture 24, Zephaniah

Biblical eLearning ( presents: Dr. Gary Yates on the Book of the Twelve [Minor Prophets]
This is the twenty-fourth of thirty lectures on the Book of the Twelve [Minor Prophets] by Dr. Gary Yates. Gary is the head of the Th. M. program at Liberty University. He has published numerous articles on Jeremiah: Jeremiah's Message of Judgment and Hope for God's Unfaithful 'Wife', Bibliotheca Sacra (2010); New Exodus and No Exodus in Jeremiah 26-45 Promise and Warning to the Exiles in Babylon, Tyndale Bulletin (2006) and Ishmael's Assassination of Gedaliah: Echoes of the Saul-David Story in Jeremiah 40:7-41:18, Westminster Theological Journal (2005). He is also
authoring a book on the Book of the Twelve (forthcoming).

Habbakuk to Hebrews

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