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Lecture 18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

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Lecture 18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure of the Book of Micah
05:26 - Chapter 2. Common Paradoxes in Prophetic Writings
10:40 - Chapter 3. The Book of Zephaniah
14:37 - Chapter 4. The Book of Nahum
19:46 - Chapter 5. The Book of Habakkuk
24:52 - Chapter 6. Structure and Features of the Book of Jeremiah
39:11 - Chapter 7. Unique Features of Jeremiah's Message of Consolation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Lecture 19. Literary Prophecy: Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The destruction of Jerusalem challenged the faith of the nation. What was the meaning of this event and how could such tremendous evil and suffering be reconciled with the nature of God himself? Professor Hayes shows how Israel's prophets attempted to answer this question, turning the nation's defeat and despair into an occasion for renewing faith in Israel's God. The lecture continues with an in-depth study of the book of Ezekiel. Ezekiel's denunciations of Jerusalem are among the most lurid and violent in the Bible and he concludes that destruction is the only possible remedy. Ezekiel's visions include God's withdrawal from Jerusalem to be with his people in exile, and his ultimate return. Ezekiel's use of dramatic prophetic signs, his rejection of collective divine punishment and assertion of individual responsibility are discussed. The last part of the lecture turns to Second Isaiah and the famous servant songs that find a universal significance in Israel's suffering.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure and Tone of the Book of Ezekiel
09:53 - Chapter 2. Ezekiel's Denunciations of Jerusalem and Rejection of Collective Punishment
17:54 - Chapter 3. The Sometimes Contradictory Nature of the Biblical Text
21:39 - Chapter 4. Ezekiel's Interpretation of the Final Destruction of Jerusalem
31:58 - Chapter 5.Major Themes in Second Isaiah
38:00 - Chapter 6. Second Isaiah's Servant Songs

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Lecture 17. Literary Prophecy: Hosea and Isaiah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The lecture focuses on the eighth-century northern prophet Hosea, a linguistically difficult book set against the backdrop of the expansionist Assyrian Empire. Hosea's marriage symbolizes Israel's relationship with God and serves to remind Israel of God's forbearance and Israel's obligations and pledge to loyalty under the covenant at Sinai. The second half of the lecture shifts to Isaiah and his emphasis on the Davidic Covenant, rather than the Mosaic one, a key distinction between him and Hosea. Themes in Isaiah include the salvation of a remnant, Israel's election to a mission and an eschatology that centers around a messiah (anointed) king of the house of David.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Historical Background for and Major Themes of the Book of Hosea
13:29 - Chapter 2. Doom and Hope as Two Conceptions of Covenant
18:00 - Chapter 3. Historical Background for and Structure of the Book of Isaiah
25:55 - Chapter 4. Emphasis on the Davidic Covenant
36:47 - Chapter 5. Major Themes in the Book of Isaiah

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Lecture 24. Alternative Visions: Esther, Ruth, and Jonah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, two final books of the Bible are examined and their attitudes towards foreign nations compared. In contrast to Daniel's reliance on divine intervention to punish the wicked, the book of Esther focuses on human initiative in defeating the enemies of Israel. Finally, the book of Jonah--in which the wicked Assyrians repent and are spared divine punishment--expresses the view that God is compassionate and concerned with all creation. Professor Hayes concludes the course with remarks regarding the dynamic and complex messages presented in the Hebrew Bible.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Esther
09:29 - Chapter 2. The Book of Jonah
20:32 - Chapter 3. Concluding Remarks about the Dynamic and Complex Messages in the Hebrew Bible

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Lecture 14. The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The tension between covenant theology, emphasizing the conditional Mosaic convenant from Mt. Sinai, and royal theology emphasizing the unconditional covenant with David in his palace on Mt. Zion, is traced. Following Solomon's death, the united kingdom separated into a northern and a southern kingdom (named Israel and Judah respectively), the former falling to the Assyrians in 722 and the latter to the Babylonians in 586. Analysis of the Deuteronomistic School's response to these historical crises and subsequent exile to Babylonia is evidenced through redaction criticism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Uncompromising Honesty of the Story of David
10:29 - Chapter 2. Tensions in Kings I and II
31:21 - Chapter 3. The Separation of the Kingdom Following Solomon's Death
42:10 - Chapter 4. Historiosophy of the Deuteronomistic School

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Minor Prophets Micah

The Gospel Broadcasting Network is a non-profit organization that is fully-funded and supported by the churches of Christ. Find out more about us on

Pre-Exilic Prophets: Micah, Pt. 1 (GCBI 106.09)

GCBI is a one year Bible program designed to give students the tools and knowledge required to understand the Bible and form a Biblical worldview, with the goal of following Jesus' last command to make disciples of all nations. For more information on how to get involved with the ministry, or to submit an application to become a student, visit

One Year. One Book. One Goal. Make Disciples!

Lecture 12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the study of Deuteronomy and traces the contribution of the Deuteronomistic School: a historiosophy according to which Israel's fortunes are dependent upon and an indicator of her fidelity to the covenant. The books of the Former Prophets are introduced with attention to their historical and geographical context. The book of Joshua's account of Israel's conquest of Canaan is contrasted with scholarly accounts of Israel's emergence in Canaan and formation as a nation state.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Deuteronomy: A Capstone to the Pentateuchal Narrative
06:05 - Chapter 2. Source Theory and the Pentateuch
13:26 - Chapter 3. Introduction to the Former Prophets
21:54 - Chapter 4. Geographical Setting and Its Historical Implications
27:39 - Chapter 5. Structure of Joshua
34:29 - Chapter 6. Three Scholarly Models for the Emergence of the Nation State of Israel

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Micah the Prophet

Overview of the OT minor prophet Micah.
(PowerPoint background and other features created by Pastor Ken Merrihew, Senior Pastor of Calvary Chapel Oklahoma City and used with permission.)
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18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

Overview

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Micah (JSB pp. 1205-6), Micah 1-7
(2) Introduction to Nahum (JSB pp. 1219-20), Nahum 1-3
(3) Introduction to Habbakuk (JSB pp. 1226-7), Habbakuk 1-3
(4) Introduction to Zephaniah (JSB pp. 1234-5), Zephaniah 1-3

Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah

Lecture on the minor prophets of the Old Testament. Class lecture for Lakeside Institute of Theology.

One Hour. One Book: Zephaniah

GCBI is a one year Bible program designed to give students the tools and knowledge required to understand the Bible and form a Biblical worldview, with the goal of following Jesus' last command to make disciples of all nations. For more information on how to get involved with the ministry, or to submit an application to become a student, visit

One Year. One Book. One Goal. Make Disciples!

The Books of Nahum, Zephaniah, and Habakkuk

Discussions on the Old Testament
The Books of Nahum, Zephaniah, and Habakkuk
Originally aired: 2/27/2006
Nahum 1-Zeph. 3

OT Survey - Nahum, Habakkuk & Zephaniah

Pastor Steve Looper
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e-Bible (Lesson 31) Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah

Join Fred and Valerie Paine as they highlight 3 more books from the Minor Prophets: Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah. A common theme of these books includes the principle of Sowing and Reaping - if you plant seeds of disobedience, you will harvest an evil crop. If you sow seeds of obedience to God, you will harvest a good crop. The just shall live be faith - what is faith? Listen to the lesson to learn the answer.

Dr. Gary Yates, Book of the Twelve [Minor Prophets], Lecture 24, Zephaniah

Biblical eLearning ( presents: Dr. Gary Yates on the Book of the Twelve [Minor Prophets]
This is the twenty-fourth of thirty lectures on the Book of the Twelve [Minor Prophets] by Dr. Gary Yates. Gary is the head of the Th. M. program at Liberty University. He has published numerous articles on Jeremiah: Jeremiah's Message of Judgment and Hope for God's Unfaithful 'Wife', Bibliotheca Sacra (2010); New Exodus and No Exodus in Jeremiah 26-45 Promise and Warning to the Exiles in Babylon, Tyndale Bulletin (2006) and Ishmael's Assassination of Gedaliah: Echoes of the Saul-David Story in Jeremiah 40:7-41:18, Westminster Theological Journal (2005). He is also
authoring a book on the Book of the Twelve (forthcoming).

Habbakuk

If you would like to talk to someone about this message, don’t hesitate to contact us on 07 3802 1426 or drop by and visit out contact us page. Above all we pray that this message helps you with your walk with God.

11.19, 2016.Remnant Day/Core Msg: Book of Micah

Rev. Kwang Su Ryu, Immanuel Church in Korea,

Dr. Gary Yates, Book of the Twelve [Minor Prophets, Lecture 21, Micah Restoration

Biblical eLearning ( presents: Dr. Gary Yates on the Book of the Twelve [Minor Prophets]
This is the twenty-first of thirty lectures on the Book of the Twelve [Minor Prophets] by Dr. Gary Yates. Gary is the head of the Th. M. program at Liberty University. He has published numerous articles on Jeremiah: Jeremiah's Message of Judgment and Hope for God's Unfaithful 'Wife', Bibliotheca Sacra (2010); New Exodus and No Exodus in Jeremiah 26-45 Promise and Warning to the Exiles in Babylon, Tyndale Bulletin (2006) and Ishmael's Assassination of Gedaliah: Echoes of the Saul-David Story in Jeremiah 40:7-41:18, Westminster Theological Journal (2005). He is also
authoring a book on the Book of the Twelve (forthcoming).

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