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Lecture 19. Literary Prophecy: Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah)

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Lecture 19. Literary Prophecy: Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The destruction of Jerusalem challenged the faith of the nation. What was the meaning of this event and how could such tremendous evil and suffering be reconciled with the nature of God himself? Professor Hayes shows how Israel's prophets attempted to answer this question, turning the nation's defeat and despair into an occasion for renewing faith in Israel's God. The lecture continues with an in-depth study of the book of Ezekiel. Ezekiel's denunciations of Jerusalem are among the most lurid and violent in the Bible and he concludes that destruction is the only possible remedy. Ezekiel's visions include God's withdrawal from Jerusalem to be with his people in exile, and his ultimate return. Ezekiel's use of dramatic prophetic signs, his rejection of collective divine punishment and assertion of individual responsibility are discussed. The last part of the lecture turns to Second Isaiah and the famous servant songs that find a universal significance in Israel's suffering.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure and Tone of the Book of Ezekiel
09:53 - Chapter 2. Ezekiel's Denunciations of Jerusalem and Rejection of Collective Punishment
17:54 - Chapter 3. The Sometimes Contradictory Nature of the Biblical Text
21:39 - Chapter 4. Ezekiel's Interpretation of the Final Destruction of Jerusalem
31:58 - Chapter 5.Major Themes in Second Isaiah
38:00 - Chapter 6. Second Isaiah's Servant Songs

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

19. Literary Prophecy: Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah)

Overview

The destruction of Jerusalem challenged the faith of the nation. What was the meaning of this event and how could such tremendous evil and suffering be reconciled with the nature of God himself? Professor Hayes shows how Israel's prophets attempted to answer this question, turning the nation's defeat and despair into an occasion for renewing faith in Israel's God. The lecture continues with an in-depth study of the book of Ezekiel. Ezekiel's denunciations of Jerusalem are among the most lurid and violent in the Bible and he concludes that destruction is the only possible remedy. Ezekiel's visions include God's withdrawal from Jerusalem to be with his people in exile, and his ultimate return. Ezekiel's use of dramatic prophetic signs, his rejection of collective divine punishment and assertion of individual responsibility are discussed. The last part of the lecture turns to Second Isaiah and the famous servant songs that find a universal significance in Israel's suffering.

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Jeremiah (JSB pp 917-920), Jeremiah 1-8, 18-21, 23, 25-45, 52
(2) Introduction to Ezekiel (JSB pp 1042-45), Ezekiel 1-5:4, 8-11, 16-18, 23, 28, 33, 36-37, 40, 47
(3) Isaiah 40-42, 49-55
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Lecture 18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure of the Book of Micah
05:26 - Chapter 2. Common Paradoxes in Prophetic Writings
10:40 - Chapter 3. The Book of Zephaniah
14:37 - Chapter 4. The Book of Nahum
19:46 - Chapter 5. The Book of Habakkuk
24:52 - Chapter 6. Structure and Features of the Book of Jeremiah
39:11 - Chapter 7. Unique Features of Jeremiah's Message of Consolation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

3454 Prophecy: Jeremiah, Isaiah, Ezekiel And The Prophets Preach The Same Message...

3454 SM101815 Prophecy: Jeremiah, Isaiah, Ezekiel And The Prophets Preach The Same Message- Jeremiah's Account Of Judah's (Southern Israel) Destruction- Jeremiah Is Set Free

Contact us at jimbrown@graceandtruth.net for free Dvds and visit our website at graceandtruth.net
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Ezekiel Jeremiah & Daniel

Lecture 17. Literary Prophecy: Hosea and Isaiah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The lecture focuses on the eighth-century northern prophet Hosea, a linguistically difficult book set against the backdrop of the expansionist Assyrian Empire. Hosea's marriage symbolizes Israel's relationship with God and serves to remind Israel of God's forbearance and Israel's obligations and pledge to loyalty under the covenant at Sinai. The second half of the lecture shifts to Isaiah and his emphasis on the Davidic Covenant, rather than the Mosaic one, a key distinction between him and Hosea. Themes in Isaiah include the salvation of a remnant, Israel's election to a mission and an eschatology that centers around a messiah (anointed) king of the house of David.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Historical Background for and Major Themes of the Book of Hosea
13:29 - Chapter 2. Doom and Hope as Two Conceptions of Covenant
18:00 - Chapter 3. Historical Background for and Structure of the Book of Isaiah
25:55 - Chapter 4. Emphasis on the Davidic Covenant
36:47 - Chapter 5. Major Themes in the Book of Isaiah

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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70 Weeks of Daniel

70 Weeks of Daniel

Dr. Gary Yates, Jeremiah, Lecture 1, Jeremiah as Prophet

Biblical eLearning ( presents: Dr. Gary Yates on Jeremiah
This is the first of thirty lectures on the Book of Jeremiah by Dr. Gary Yates. Gary is the head of the Th. M. program at Liberty University. He has published numerous articles on Jeremiah: Jeremiah's Message of Judgment and Hope for God's Unfaithful 'Wife', Bibliotheca Sacra (2010); New Exodus and No Exodus in Jeremiah 26-45 Promise and Warning to the Exiles in Babylon, Tyndale Bulletin (2006) and Ishmael's Assassination of Gedaliah: Echoes of the Saul-David Story in Jeremiah 40:7-41:18, Westminster Theological Journal (2005). He is also
authoring a book on the Book of the Twelve (forthcoming).

Book of Jeremiah - Overview | Steve Gregg

| This is an introductory look at Jeremiah and the background of the book presented by Steve Gregg at The New Great Commission School in 2012.

You can listen to the entire series on Jeremiah via MP3 audio at Theos.org/media

Lecture - Tremper Longman III - God is a Warrior: Coming to Terms with Divine Violence in the OT

Lecture by Tremper Longman III “God is a Warrior: Coming to Terms with Divine Violence in the Old Testament”

Especially since 9/11 Christians in the West have been sensitive to descriptions of God acting violently toward his human creatures. Many contemporary Christians find the stories of Noah’s flood, the conquest of Jericho, and other similar accounts of divine violence disturbing. God’s command to “completely annihilate” (herem) the Canaanites troubles many. Reactions to these descriptions have led many scholars today (Enns and Siebert in particular) to provide other explanations or to suggest that the picture of God we get in the Old Testament is out of keeping with the ethics of Jesus. They, therefore, conclude that the God of the text is not the same as the real God. Over against these viewpoints, this lecture will show how the Bible, Old and New Testaments, provide a coherent picture of God’s fight against evil from the Fall until the Consummation.

Given on Saturday, September 16, 2017, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. at The Lanier Theological Library Chapel in Houston, Texas.

It is part of the Lanier Library Lecture Series. A series devoted to bringing world class lectures to benefit the community of all those who might be interested.

I am indebted to the generosity of the library to allow me to share these videos of theirs. Please support them by visiting their website for more information and resources:



Bio info

Tremper Longman III is Distinguished Professor of Biblical Studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California. He earned a B.A. in Religion at Ohio Wesleyan University, M.Div. from Westminster Theological Seminary and a Ph.D. in Ancient Near Eastern Studies from Yale University. Prior to joining Westmont in 1998, Longman taught for 18 years at Westminster in Philadelphia.

Tremper has authored or co-authored over thirty books and written numerous articles. His books have been translated into 17 languages. A number of these works are interdisciplinary. His Literary Approaches to Biblical Interpretation (Zondervan, 1987), Complete Literary Guide to the Bible (contributor and co-editor with Leland Ryken; Zondervan, 1993) and numerous articles approach the study of the Bible through literary criticism.

He also co-authors books with the psychologist Dan Allender including Bold Love (NavPress, 1991), Cry of the Soul (NavPress, 1994), Intimate Allies (Tyndale House Publishers, 1995), Bold Purpose (Tyndale House Publishers, 1997), The Intimate Mystery - Marriage Series (InterVarsity Press, 2005), Breaking the Idols of Your Heart: How to Navigate the Temptations of Life (IVP, 2007) and God Loves Sex: An Honest Discussion of Sexual Desire and Holiness (Baker, 2014).

Longman’s interest in history and historiography is expressed in A Biblical History of Israel (co-authored with Iain Provan and Phil Long, 2nd edition, Westminster John Knox, 2015). He has also written commentaries on Song of Songs (Eerdmans), Ecclesiastes (Eerdmans), Daniel (Zondervan), Nahum Baker), Jeremiah and Lamentations (Hendrickson), Proverbs, Job (Baker), Psalms (IVP), and Genesis (Zondervan). With InterVarsity Press, he has also written these five books: How to Read Psalms, How to Read Proverbs, How to Read Genesis, How to Read Exodus, and How to Read Job.

His new book in 2017 is The Fear of the Lord is Wisdom: A Theological Introduction to Wisdom in Israel. He also co-edited and wrote articles for The Dictionary of the Old Testament: Wisdom, Poetry and Writings (IVP). In addition, he is one of the main translators of the popular New Living Translation and has served as a consultant on other popular translations of the Bible including the Message, the New Century Version, and the Holman Standard Bible.

Tremper is married to Alice, and they have three sons and four granddaughters.
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Lecture 16. Literary Prophecy: Amos

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the literary prophets of both the northern and southern kingdoms. The prophetic books are anthologies of oracles the sequence of which is often determined by literary rather than chronological considerations. This lecture studies the literary features and major themes of classical Israelite prophecy as evidenced in particular in the book of the eighth-century northern prophet Amos. The prophets denounced moral decay and false piety as directly responsible for the social injustice that outrages God. While the Deuteronomist blames the nation's misfortunes on acts of idolatry, the prophets stress that the nation will be punished for everyday incidents of immorality. The literary prophets counterbalance their warnings with messages of great hope and consolation.

00:00 - Chapter 1. An Introduction to the Literary Prophets
05:32 - Chapter 2. Structure of and Literary Features in the Book of Amos
22:29 - Chapter 3. Major Themes in the Book of Amos
33:51 - Chapter 4. Differences between Deuteronomistic and Prophetic Interpretations of Israel's History

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 20. Responses to Suffering and Evil: Lamentations and Wisdom Literature

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture begins with the Book of Lamentations, a short book of dirges that laments the destruction of Jerusalem and moves on to introduce the third and final section of the Hebrew Bible - the Ketuvim, or Writings. This section of the Bible contains three books that exemplify the ancient Near Eastern literary genre of Wisdom -- Proverbs, Job and Ecclesiastes. Proverbs reinforces the Deuteronomistic idea of divine retributive justice according to which the good prosper and the evil are punished. The conventional assumption of a moral world order is attacked in the Book of Job. The book explores whether people will sustain virtue when suffering and afflicted, and brings charges of negligence and mismanagement against God for failing to punish the wicked and allowing the righteous to suffer.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Lamentations
08:31 - Chapter 2. An Introduction to Wisdom Books in the Ketuvim
13:19 - Chapter 3. The Book of Proverbs
19:48 - Chapter 4. Structure of and Literary Components in The Book of Job
25:40 - Chapter 5. Prose Prologue in the Book of Job
30:36 - Chapter 6. Poetic Speech Cycles in the Book of Job
45:26 - Chapter 7. God's Response in the Book of Job

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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WHY EXILE?

This video is about My Movie

18. Literary Prophecy: Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum and Habbakuk

Overview

Micah, eighth-century southern prophet and contemporary of Isaiah, is discussed. Structurally, the book of Micah alternates three prophecies of doom and destruction and three prophecies of hope and restoration. Micah attacks the doctrine of the inviolability of Zion and employs the literary form of a covenant lawsuit (or riv) in his denunciation of the nation. Several short prophetic books are also discussed: Zephaniah; the Book of Nahum, depicting the downfall of Assyria and distinguished for its vivid poetic style; and the book of Habbakuk, which contains philosophical musings on God's behavior. The final part of the lecture turns to the lengthy book of Jeremiah. A prophet at the time of the destruction and exile, Jeremiah predicted an end to the exile after 70 years and a new covenant that would be inscribed on the hearts of the nation.

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Introduction to Micah (JSB pp. 1205-6), Micah 1-7
(2) Introduction to Nahum (JSB pp. 1219-20), Nahum 1-3
(3) Introduction to Habbakuk (JSB pp. 1226-7), Habbakuk 1-3
(4) Introduction to Zephaniah (JSB pp. 1234-5), Zephaniah 1-3

Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.
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Lecture 1: Exposition of Ezekiel - Dr. Ralph Alexander

The Master's Seminary -

Dr. Gary Yates, Jeremiah, Lecture 2, Misunderstanding the Prophets

Biblical eLearning ( presents: Dr. Gary Yates on Jeremiah
This is the second of thirty lectures on the Book of Jeremiah by Dr. Gary Yates. Gary is the head of the Th. M. program at Liberty University. He has published numerous articles on Jeremiah: Jeremiah's Message of Judgment and Hope for God's Unfaithful 'Wife', Bibliotheca Sacra (2010); New Exodus and No Exodus in Jeremiah 26-45 Promise and Warning to the Exiles in Babylon, Tyndale Bulletin (2006) and Ishmael's Assassination of Gedaliah: Echoes of the Saul-David Story in Jeremiah 40:7-41:18, Westminster Theological Journal (2005). He is also
authoring a book on the Book of the Twelve (forthcoming).

Lecture 23. Visions of the End: Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The Book of Ruth, in which a foreign woman enters the community of Israel and becomes great-grandmother to none other than King David, expresses a view of gentiles entirely opposed to that of Ezra and Nehemiah. Other prophets of the Restoration period are discussed, including Third Isaiah who also envisions other nations joining Israel in the worship of Yahweh. This period also sees the rise of apocalyptic literature in works like Zechariah, Joel and Daniel. Written during a period of persecution in the 2nd c. BCE the book of Daniel contains many features and themes of apocalyptic literature, including an eschatology according to which God dramatically intervenes in human history, destroying the wicked (understood as other nations) and saving the righteous (understood as Israel).

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Ruth
11:58 - Chapter 2. The Last Prophetic Books
23:05 - Chapter 3. Features of Apocalyptic Literature
29:11 - Chapter 4. Apocalyptic Passages in Post-Exilic Books
35:21 - Chapter 5. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 1-6
42:36 - Chapter 6. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 7-12

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Dr. Leslie Allen, Ezekiel, Lecture 1, Ezekiel among the Prophets

Biblical eLearning ( presents:
Dr. Leslie Allen has a Ph. D. in Hebrew from London University and an MA in Classics and Oriental Studies from Cambridge University. He has written books on Psalms (NICOT), Jeremiah (OT Library), 1-2 Chronicles; Prophets: Language, Image and Structure in the Prophetic Writings (JSOT Sup) and two volumes on Ezekiel for the Word Biblical Commentary series.

Hosea and Isaiah | Literary Prophecy | Educational Documentary Films

Hosea and Isaiah | Literary Prophecy | Educational Documentary Films

The Book of Hosea is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. According to the traditional order of most Hebrew Bibles, it is the first of the twelve Minor Prophets. Hosea (הושֵעַ) prophesied during a dark and melancholic era of Israels history, the period of the Northern Kingdoms decline and fall in the 8th century BC. The apostasy of the people was rampant, having turned away from God in order to serve both the calves of Jeroboam[1] and Baal, a Canaanite god.

The Book of Isaiah (Hebrew: ספר ישעיהו‎, IPA: [sɛ.fɛr jə.ʃaʕ.ˈjɑː.hu]) is the first of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible and the first of the Major Prophets in English Bibles.[1] The book is identified by a superscription as the works of the 8th-century BCE prophet Isaiah ben Amoz, but there is ample evidence that much of it was composed during the Babylonian captivity and later.[2] Bernhard Duhm originated the view, held as a consensus through most of the 20th century, that the book comprises three separate collections of oracles:[3][4] Proto-Isaiah (chapters 1–39), containing the words of Isaiah; Deutero-Isaiah (chapters 40–55), the work of an anonymous 6th-century author writing during the Exile; and Trito-Isaiah (chapters 56–66), composed after the return from Exile.[5] While virtually no one today attributes the entire book, or even most of it, to one person,[3] the books essential unity has become a focus in current research. Isaiah 1–33 promises judgment and restoration for Judah, Jerusalem and the nations, and chapters 34–66 presume that judgment has been pronounced and restoration follows soon.[6] It can thus be read as an extended meditation on the destiny of Jerusalem into and after the Exile.

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