This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Lecture 23. Visions of the End: Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature

x

Lecture 23. Visions of the End: Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The Book of Ruth, in which a foreign woman enters the community of Israel and becomes great-grandmother to none other than King David, expresses a view of gentiles entirely opposed to that of Ezra and Nehemiah. Other prophets of the Restoration period are discussed, including Third Isaiah who also envisions other nations joining Israel in the worship of Yahweh. This period also sees the rise of apocalyptic literature in works like Zechariah, Joel and Daniel. Written during a period of persecution in the 2nd c. BCE the book of Daniel contains many features and themes of apocalyptic literature, including an eschatology according to which God dramatically intervenes in human history, destroying the wicked (understood as other nations) and saving the righteous (understood as Israel).

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Ruth
11:58 - Chapter 2. The Last Prophetic Books
23:05 - Chapter 3. Features of Apocalyptic Literature
29:11 - Chapter 4. Apocalyptic Passages in Post-Exilic Books
35:21 - Chapter 5. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 1-6
42:36 - Chapter 6. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 7-12

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

23. Visions of the End: Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature

Overview

The Book of Ruth, in which a foreign woman enters the community of Israel and becomes great-grandmother to none other than King David, expresses a view of gentiles entirely opposed to that of Ezra and Nehemiah. Other prophets of the Restoration period are discussed, including Third Isaiah who also envisions other nations joining Israel in the worship of Yahweh. This period also sees the rise of apocalyptic literature in works like Zechariah, Joel and Daniel. Written during a period of persecution in the 2nd c. BCE the book of Daniel contains many features and themes of apocalyptic literature, including an eschatology according to which God dramatically intervenes in human history, destroying the wicked (understood as other nations) and saving the righteous (understood as Israel).

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Isaiah 56-66
(2) Introduction to Joel (JSB pp. 1166-7), Joel 1-4
(3) Introduction to Daniel (JSB pp. 1640-42), Daniel 1-12
x

23. Apocalyptic and Resistance

Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152)

The Apocalypse, or the Revelation of John, shares many of the traits found in apocalyptic literature: it operates in dualisms--earthly events contrasted with heavenly ones, present time with the imminent future, and it calls for cultural and political resistance. Its structure is like a spiral, presenting cycle after cycle of building tension and reprieve, so that the reader who experiences the text also experiences crisis and then catharsis. Politically, Revelation equates Rome with Babylon and the empire as the domain of Satan.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Revelation of John and the Genre of Apocalyptic
12:49 - Chapter 2. The Structure of Revelation
28:00 - Chapter 3. Crisis, Catharsis, and Politics in Revelation
42:02 - Chapter 4. The Social Context of Revelation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

Lecture 23 - Apocalyptic and Resistance

Overview

The Apocalypse, or the Revelation of John, shares many of the traits found in apocalyptic literature: it operates in dualisms--earthly events contrasted with heavenly ones, present time with the imminent future, and it calls for cultural and political resistance. Its structure is like a spiral, presenting cycle after cycle of building tension and reprieve, so that the reader who experiences the text also experiences crisis and then catharsis. Politically, Revelation equates Rome with Babylon and the empire as the domain of Satan.

Resources

Handout: Spiral Outline of Revelation [PDF] -

Assignment

Ehrman, Bart D. The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, pp. 469-486

Bible: Revelation
x

How to Read Apocalyptic Literature

Apocalyptic literature is a challenging genre.

In the Bible, we find this genre in the Book of Revelation and in the second half of Daniel.

There’s also a lot of apocalyptic literature outside the Bible. It was a very popular genre during the Second Temple period (from 530 BC to 70 AD), and so we have a lot of examples of the purpose, form, and style of apocalyptic literature to inform our understanding of how it functions in Scripture.

Since it’s such a different style of writing than the gospels, epistles, or historical and theological writings we find elsewhere in the Bible, it’s important that we approach apocalyptic literature with a different perspective.

LEARN MORE:

+ 5 tips for reading apocalyptic literature -
+ Online course on the book of Revelation -
+ Online course on the book of Daniel -

APOCALYPTIC PROPHECY - Messages in the Holy Scriptures (Apocalypse #7)

What are the Apocalyptic Messages found in the Holy Bible?
Who are some of the biblical prophets that preceded and contributed to the development of Apocalyptic writing?
What were the pre-Apocalyptic themes they wrote of?

Fr. Bill discusses a portion of two of the Biblical Prophets, Ezekiel and Isaiah, to illustrate early themes and symbolism of apocalyptic and eschatological writings.

-------------------------------------

Find Fr. Bill’s Book, “I Saw the World End: An Introduction to the Bible’s Apocalyptic Literature”:
at Paulist Press –
at Barnes & Noble –
at Amazon –
--------------------------
Whisper Films, Burbank, CA
x

Apocalyptic Literature

Apocalyptic Literature

7 Daniel Apocalyptic Section

Dan Lewis lectures on the Apocalyptic sections of Daniel.

HOW DOES THE BOOK OF DANIEL "PREDICT" HISTORY? (Apocalypse #9)

Daniel's Visions, received during the Babylonian Exile, offer glimpses into the coming history of the Jewish People.

Fr. Bill discusses how the Book of Daniel conveys the foresight of the Prophet Daniel into his people impending destiny in the face of the history of the region at that time.

------------------------
Find Fr. Bill’s Book, “I Saw the World End: An Introduction to the Bible’s Apocalyptic Literature”:
at Paulist Press –
at Barnes & Noble –
at Amazon –
--------------------------
Whisper Films, Burbank, CA

Characteristics of Apocalyptic Literature

What are some distinctive characteristics of apocalyptic literature?
Dr. William Edgar

Apocalyptic literature shows up in many places in the ancient world, and of course, it is in the Bible as well. And you can always recognize it because it's not linear, it's not straight history; it's laden with images. Not that these images are unrelated to history. They often are used to predict what the future is going to be, a statue with different parts in the book of Daniel, which predicts succeeding empires. Or the book of the Revelation is replete with such apocalyptic imagery, the four horsemen, for example, or the bowls pouring out judgment. And in addition to these darker things, the bright things, such as the New Jerusalem descending out of heaven. So, apocalyptic literature is characterized by a sort of mosaic way of appearing. And you're glad the whole Bible isn't apocalyptic, because we'd have trouble understanding it probably. We'd spend most of our time interpreting it. So, we have other parts of the Bible, which are more linear, and they work together in a perfect harmony. I think one of the reasons for that is that God is not just teaching us, either points of doctrine, or elements of history in an isolated fashion, but he's presenting his self, his person, his covenant presence, and we relate to that as entire people. Images are important parts of who we are as we respond, as are words, and as is linear history. So, apocalyptic literature, in the context of the whole, is quite wonderful.

Learn more at
x

Destination: Daniel 7-12 | Skip Heitzig

Episode 38 of 65 in our series The Bible from 30,000 Feet - 2007 with Skip Heitzig.
Watch the complete series:

MESSAGE SUMMARY:

Our thirty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through the second part of Daniel. As we look at chapters 7-12, we will see the four prophetic visions of Daniel, and observe how his faith in God's fulfillment of prophecies led him to fervent prayer for the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Daniel 9-12.

To support this ministry and help us continue to reach people all around the world click here:

Apocalypse starts within a year and a half? 2 visions🙏

What ever comes to you on this feel free to write it in the commemts. I didn't want to give any extra opinion on this. I just wanted to share what I heard and didn't want to add anything to it. A year and a half from may 23 2018 is November 23 2019[ coincidently a day before my 23 birthday). Within a time and a half🙏 stock now if you feel lead too. Ask God about this🙏
x

DANIEL'S VISIONS OF WAR - The Hellenistic Era (Apocalypse #18)

The Last Apocalyptic Vision in the Book of Daniel is the longest and most detailed, but also the most thinly veiled of Daniel's Visions.

Fr. Bill wraps of his review of the Book of Daniel with a discussion of Daniel's Vision of the Hellenistic Wars, with a brief tough-up on the Apocryphal stories of Susanna and of Bel and the Dragon.

NEXT VIDEO COMING IN THREE WEEKS!!!

------------------------------------

Find Fr. Bill’s Book, “I Saw the World End: An Introduction to the Bible’s Apocalyptic Literature”:
at Paulist Press –
at Barnes & Noble –
at Amazon –
--------------------------
Whisper Films, Burbank, CA

"APOCALYPSE" OF DANIEL - The Book of Daniel (Apocalypse #8)

Part 8 of Fr. Bill's series on Apocalypse begins his analysis of the Apocalyptic Writing of the Old Testament known as THE BOOK OF THE PROPHET DANIEL.

What is it?
How is it composed?
What does its structure consist of?
What is its content in the stories it tells and the visions it conveys?

-------------------------------

Find Fr. Bill’s Book, “I Saw the World End: An Introduction to the Bible’s Apocalyptic Literature”:
at Paulist Press –
at Barnes & Noble –
at Amazon –

Ahistorical Apocalypse

23 11 = part 245 of series

Next: 23-12:

playlist 11

List of uploads within playlist:

Main channel:

Difficulties in the restoration community prompted post-exilic prophets to take new approaches to Yehud's troubles.

Earlier, classical prophets had promised a glorious, restored remnant, but post-exilic times were difficult. Attempting to encourage the disillusioned populace, post-exilic prophets shifted the promised glory to an undefined end time, an eschaton.

Some eschatologies take the form of an apocalypse -- most post-date the Hebrew Bible.

Features of apocalyptic writings include
- pseudonymous attribution to important figures of the past
- delivery by heavenly messenger in a vision or a dream
- message is symbolic, often bizarre, chronological, and coded
- predict a series of catastrophes
- morally dualistic, dividing humankind into two mutually exclusive groups; a few righteous individual, and the wicked majority.
- God depicted as an enthroned king.
- mythological motifs and imagery, especially the motif of a battle between God and primordial, chaotic elements.
- judgment of the individual dead, followed by everlasting life or punishment.

Apocalyptic writings within the Hebrew Bible include Second Zechariah, the Book of Joel, and, of course, the Book of Daniel. Daniel telescopes over one century into a short period, and muddles historical details, indicating that it was written at least three centuries later than it claims.

The Bibles Buried Secrets website:

including:
Who Wrote the Flood Story?

Writers of the Bible:

Archeological Evidence and Timeline:


This is part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here:



Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism).




Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT:













The audio for the lecture series is available through Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
x

Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

10. Reading Apocalyptic Literature | How to Read the Bible


Apocalyptic literature is found throughout the Bible in both the Old Testament and New Testament. While apocalyptic literature may seem cryptic at times, the purpose of of the writer was not to cover up the message, but to make it clear. Join Steven Lloyd as he presents specific examples of this type of literature and gives tools to the Bible student on how to better examine it.

Lecture 24. Alternative Visions: Esther, Ruth, and Jonah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, two final books of the Bible are examined and their attitudes towards foreign nations compared. In contrast to Daniel's reliance on divine intervention to punish the wicked, the book of Esther focuses on human initiative in defeating the enemies of Israel. Finally, the book of Jonah--in which the wicked Assyrians repent and are spared divine punishment--expresses the view that God is compassionate and concerned with all creation. Professor Hayes concludes the course with remarks regarding the dynamic and complex messages presented in the Hebrew Bible.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Esther
09:29 - Chapter 2. The Book of Jonah
20:32 - Chapter 3. Concluding Remarks about the Dynamic and Complex Messages in the Hebrew Bible

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Daniel 9-12 - The Bible from 30,000 Feet - Skip Heitzig - Flight DAN02

Midway through the book of Daniel, the focus shifts from the historic to the prophetic. Daniel's four prophetic visions reveal the stunning accuracy of biblical prophecy, as well as Daniel's uncompromising faith in God's fulfillment. From the rise and fall of human kingdoms to the Messiah and the day of judgment, Daniel's visions drove him to his knees in fervent prayer for the people of Israel.

This teaching is from our series The Bible from 30,000 Feet - 2018 with Skip Heitzig from Calvary Church.

End-time Prophecy: Time is Short! (The Book of Daniel, Chapter 11)

- End-time Prophecy: Time is Short! (The Book of Daniel, Chapter 11)

Visit the Official WLC Channel:

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu