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Lecture 23. Visions of the End: Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature

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Lecture 23. Visions of the End: Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The Book of Ruth, in which a foreign woman enters the community of Israel and becomes great-grandmother to none other than King David, expresses a view of gentiles entirely opposed to that of Ezra and Nehemiah. Other prophets of the Restoration period are discussed, including Third Isaiah who also envisions other nations joining Israel in the worship of Yahweh. This period also sees the rise of apocalyptic literature in works like Zechariah, Joel and Daniel. Written during a period of persecution in the 2nd c. BCE the book of Daniel contains many features and themes of apocalyptic literature, including an eschatology according to which God dramatically intervenes in human history, destroying the wicked (understood as other nations) and saving the righteous (understood as Israel).

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Ruth
11:58 - Chapter 2. The Last Prophetic Books
23:05 - Chapter 3. Features of Apocalyptic Literature
29:11 - Chapter 4. Apocalyptic Passages in Post-Exilic Books
35:21 - Chapter 5. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 1-6
42:36 - Chapter 6. The Book of Daniel, Chapters 7-12

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

23. Visions of the End: Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature

Overview

The Book of Ruth, in which a foreign woman enters the community of Israel and becomes great-grandmother to none other than King David, expresses a view of gentiles entirely opposed to that of Ezra and Nehemiah. Other prophets of the Restoration period are discussed, including Third Isaiah who also envisions other nations joining Israel in the worship of Yahweh. This period also sees the rise of apocalyptic literature in works like Zechariah, Joel and Daniel. Written during a period of persecution in the 2nd c. BCE the book of Daniel contains many features and themes of apocalyptic literature, including an eschatology according to which God dramatically intervenes in human history, destroying the wicked (understood as other nations) and saving the righteous (understood as Israel).

Assignment

Bible:
(1) Isaiah 56-66
(2) Introduction to Joel (JSB pp. 1166-7), Joel 1-4
(3) Introduction to Daniel (JSB pp. 1640-42), Daniel 1-12
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23. Apocalyptic and Resistance

Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152)

The Apocalypse, or the Revelation of John, shares many of the traits found in apocalyptic literature: it operates in dualisms--earthly events contrasted with heavenly ones, present time with the imminent future, and it calls for cultural and political resistance. Its structure is like a spiral, presenting cycle after cycle of building tension and reprieve, so that the reader who experiences the text also experiences crisis and then catharsis. Politically, Revelation equates Rome with Babylon and the empire as the domain of Satan.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Revelation of John and the Genre of Apocalyptic
12:49 - Chapter 2. The Structure of Revelation
28:00 - Chapter 3. Crisis, Catharsis, and Politics in Revelation
42:02 - Chapter 4. The Social Context of Revelation

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

Biblical Literature Lecture 11 Apocalyptic Literature Eschatology

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How to Read Apocalyptic Literature

Apocalyptic literature is a challenging genre.

In the Bible, we find this genre in the Book of Revelation and in the second half of Daniel.

There’s also a lot of apocalyptic literature outside the Bible. It was a very popular genre during the Second Temple period (from 530 BC to 70 AD), and so we have a lot of examples of the purpose, form, and style of apocalyptic literature to inform our understanding of how it functions in Scripture.

Since it’s such a different style of writing than the gospels, epistles, or historical and theological writings we find elsewhere in the Bible, it’s important that we approach apocalyptic literature with a different perspective.

LEARN MORE:

+ 5 tips for reading apocalyptic literature -
+ Online course on the book of Revelation -
+ Online course on the book of Daniel -

The Nature of Apocalyptic Literature

How is apocalyptic literature similar to and different from typical biblical prophecy?
Dr. J. Scott Redd

Well, apocalyptic literature is similar to biblical prophecy in the sense that it does tell something about the future. It anticipates God's work in the world and the surety, or the confidence that God's people can have, that he will continue to be involved in the goings-ons of their life, and the life of the world around them. But when you compare apocalyptic literature to, for instance, to typical biblical prophecy, you find that there are also some very significant differences. Biblical prophecy is typically involved in the genre of prayers or speeches, for instance. Biblical prophecy is often prayers to God, lamenting for sin, repenting for sin, or prayers of praise, or prayers of thanksgiving to the Lord. So, they often show up in a sort of poetic style and involve the vivid and metaphorical imagery that we find in poetry. Sometimes, biblical prophecy is also taken up in speeches, speeches to God's people, either declaring the threat of judgment, or declaring a hope in blessing and salvation in the future. Again, like all biblical prophecies, the most significant aspect of the prophecy is that it's calling God's people to faithfulness and repentance. However, when we turn to apocalyptic literature, we find a very different mode of communication. We see the prophet, instead, taken up in the Spirit often, into sort of a spiritual realm where they watch a drama played out before them. Now, like biblical prophecy, the drama involves concerns about the future, sometimes the near future and sometimes the very distant future. But as the prophet watches this drama played out, he reports to us on what he sees. In apocalyptic visions, the prophet will often have an angelic tour guide who is explaining to him the events that he sees around him. The prophet can ask questions to the angel, and the angel will often respond or give other kinds of clarification to what the prophet is seeing in front of him. Now, the drama that is played out in a visionary apocalypse is one which is very figurative; it's very vivid in its imagery, but it tends to draw large lines and broad strokes about future events. They're always involving cosmic conflict, battle between light and darkness, battle between God and his enemies. And we see these great broad strokes being drawn out throughout the apocalyptic vision, often using very vivid and very exciting imagery. So, you see the apocalyptic genre is really a vision report, reporting on a drama that's played out in the future of great cosmic conflict between God and his enemies. Biblical prophecy, on the other hand, typically involves poetry, things like prayers and speeches. And yet, both call God's people to be both comforted and consoled by the promise of God's deliverance and his reign in the future, but also to be called back to faithfulness by the opportunity of participating in God's kingdom, and the desire to be on the side of the divine King who has the victory.

Learn more at
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Revelation -- "Apocalyptic Literature"

Seattle Pacific Seminary professor Dr. Rob Wall discusses the book of Revelation as apocalyptic literature.

"APOCALYPSE" OF DANIEL - The Book of Daniel (Apocalypse #8)

Part 8 of Fr. Bill's series on Apocalypse begins his analysis of the Apocalyptic Writing of the Old Testament known as THE BOOK OF THE PROPHET DANIEL.

What is it?
How is it composed?
What does its structure consist of?
What is its content in the stories it tells and the visions it conveys?

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Find Fr. Bill’s Book, “I Saw the World End: An Introduction to the Bible’s Apocalyptic Literature”:
at Paulist Press –
at Barnes & Noble –
at Amazon –

Hermeneutics 7: Prophetic and Apocalyptic Literature

In this session Pastor Ryan Habbena discusses interpreting prophetic and apocalyptic Scripture. The millennial views are also discussed.
You can download the handouts and find links to the articles that are referenced here:

“Apocalyptic Literature” – Johannine Literature, Video 38

In this video, Rev. Dr. Jayme Mathias illuminates the genre of apocalyptic literature!
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Daniel and Apocalyptic Literature Welcome Video

Course orientation video

HOW DOES THE BOOK OF DANIEL "PREDICT" HISTORY? (Apocalypse #9)

Daniel's Visions, received during the Babylonian Exile, offer glimpses into the coming history of the Jewish People.

Fr. Bill discusses how the Book of Daniel conveys the foresight of the Prophet Daniel into his people impending destiny in the face of the history of the region at that time.

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Find Fr. Bill’s Book, “I Saw the World End: An Introduction to the Bible’s Apocalyptic Literature”:
at Paulist Press –
at Barnes & Noble –
at Amazon –
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Whisper Films, Burbank, CA
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Revelation 1 - Background and apocalyptic literature (HQ)

All rights to Open Yale and Professor Dale Martin

DANIEL'S VISIONS OF WAR - The Hellenistic Era (Apocalypse #18)

The Last Apocalyptic Vision in the Book of Daniel is the longest and most detailed, but also the most thinly veiled of Daniel's Visions.

Fr. Bill wraps of his review of the Book of Daniel with a discussion of Daniel's Vision of the Hellenistic Wars, with a brief tough-up on the Apocryphal stories of Susanna and of Bel and the Dragon.

NEXT VIDEO COMING IN THREE WEEKS!!!

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Find Fr. Bill’s Book, “I Saw the World End: An Introduction to the Bible’s Apocalyptic Literature”:
at Paulist Press –
at Barnes & Noble –
at Amazon –
--------------------------
Whisper Films, Burbank, CA

Four Visions of Daniel's Prophecies

This study begins to examine the visions Daniel has about future kingdoms and relates them to actual historical facts.

Download Lesson Notes, PowerPoints, Audio, Video:


More about Mike Mazzalongo the Bible Teacher:


Daniel/Revelation for Beginners:


Book Available:


Order this Series on USB Stick:


Available on Amazon Prime:


Available as iTunes Podcast:


Available as Google Play Podcast:


Available as Stitcher Podcast:
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Jewish Apocalyptic Literature

Apocalyptic Literature

Apocalyptic Literature

Lecture 23 - Apocalyptic and Resistance

Overview

The Apocalypse, or the Revelation of John, shares many of the traits found in apocalyptic literature: it operates in dualisms--earthly events contrasted with heavenly ones, present time with the imminent future, and it calls for cultural and political resistance. Its structure is like a spiral, presenting cycle after cycle of building tension and reprieve, so that the reader who experiences the text also experiences crisis and then catharsis. Politically, Revelation equates Rome with Babylon and the empire as the domain of Satan.

Resources

Handout: Spiral Outline of Revelation [PDF] -

Assignment

Ehrman, Bart D. The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, pp. 469-486

Bible: Revelation

Lecture 24. Alternative Visions: Esther, Ruth, and Jonah

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, two final books of the Bible are examined and their attitudes towards foreign nations compared. In contrast to Daniel's reliance on divine intervention to punish the wicked, the book of Esther focuses on human initiative in defeating the enemies of Israel. Finally, the book of Jonah--in which the wicked Assyrians repent and are spared divine punishment--expresses the view that God is compassionate and concerned with all creation. Professor Hayes concludes the course with remarks regarding the dynamic and complex messages presented in the Hebrew Bible.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Book of Esther
09:29 - Chapter 2. The Book of Jonah
20:32 - Chapter 3. Concluding Remarks about the Dynamic and Complex Messages in the Hebrew Bible

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 15. Hebrew Prophecy: The Non-Literary Prophets

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture concludes the discussion of the Deuteronomistic historian's efforts to show that idolatry and associated sins lead to God's wrath and periods of trouble. The remainder of the lecture is an introduction to the phenomenon of Israelite prophecy which included ecstatic prophecy and prophetic guilds. The non-literary prophets of the historical books of the Bible and their various roles (as God's zealot; as conscience of the king) are examined.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Concluding Remarks about the Deuteronomistic Historian
08:33 - Chapter 2. Introduction to the Phenomenon of Israelite Prophecy
21:25 - Chapter 3. Roles Played by Prophets: Yes Men Versus True Prophets
28:20 - Chapter 4. Roles Played by Prophets: God's Zealots, Kingmakers, King-Breakers and Miracle Workers
43:01 - Chapter 5. Roles Played by Prophets: Conscience of the King

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

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