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Lecture 4. Doublets and Contradictions, Seams and Sources

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Lecture 4. Doublets and Contradictions, Seams and Sources

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture continues the discussion on Genesis, including the familiar accounts of Cain and Abel, the Flood and Noahide covenant. The story of Cain and Abel expresses the notion of the God-endowed sanctity of human life and a universal moral law governing the world. Examination of the contradictions and doublets in the flood story leads to a discussion of the complex composition and authorship of the Pentateuch. These features as well as anachronisms challenge traditional religious convictions of Moses as the author of the first five books of the Bible.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Taming of Enkidu in The Epic of Gilgamesh
05:44 - The Story of Enkidu as Parallel to the Second Story of Creation in Genesis
21:29 - Major Themes in the Story of Cain and Abel
24:02 - Comparing Mesopotamian, Semitic and Israelite Flood Stories
35:32 - Contradictions and Doublets in the Flood Story in Genesis 6-9
42:42 - Implications of the Repetitions and Contradictions throughout the Bible

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

04. Doublets and Contradictions, Seams and Sources: Genesis 5-11 and the Historical-Critical Method

Overview

This lecture continues the discussion on Genesis, including the familiar accounts of Cain and Abel, the Flood and Noahide covenant. The story of Cain and Abel expresses the notion of the God-endowed sanctity of human life and a universal moral law governing the world. Examination of the contradictions and doublets in the flood story leads to a discussion of the complex composition and authorship of the Pentateuch. These features as well as anachronisms challenge traditional religious convictions of Moses as the author of the first five books of the Bible.

Assignment

Bible: Introduction to the Torah, (JSB pp. 1-7); Gen 5-11

Habel, Norman. Literary Criticism of the Old Testament. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1971. pp. 1-42

For Section Discussion:
(1) Gen 1-3
(2) Boyarin, Daniel. Behold Israel According to the Flesh and Different Eves. In Carnal Israel. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993. pp. 31-46, 77-106
(3) Pagels, Elaine. Adam, Eve and the Serpent. New York: Random House, 1988. pp. 57-77
(4) Trible, Phyllis. Depatriarchalizing in Biblical Interpretation. In JAAR 41. pp. 30-48
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Lecture 3. The Hebrew Bible in Its Ancient Near Eastern Setting: Genesis 1-4 in Context

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In the first of a series of lectures on the book of Genesis, the basic elements of biblical monotheism are compared with Ancient Near Eastern texts to show a non-mythological, non-theogonic conception of the deity, a new conception of the purpose and meaning of human life, nature, magic and myth, sin and evil, ethics (including the universal moral law) and history. The two creation stories are explored and the work of Nahum Sarna is introduced.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Creation Story in Enuma Elish
12:44 - Chapter 2. The Creation Stories in Genesis
28:30 - Chapter 3. Creation as God Imposing Order on the World
38:17 - Allusion to and Resonances of Ancient Near Eastern Themes

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Pentateuch 2/6/15

Pentateuch Lecture
Capt. Xavier Montenegro
2/6/2015
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Lecture 2. The Hebrew Bible in Its Ancient Near Eastern Setting: Biblical Religion in Context

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

In this lecture, the Hebrew Bible is understood against the background of Ancient Near Eastern culture. Drawing from and critiquing the work of Yehezkel Kaufmann, the lecture compares the religion of the Hebrew Bible with the cultures of the Ancient Near East. Two models of development are discussed: an evolutionary model of development in which the Hebrew Bible is continuous with Ancient Near Eastern culture and a revolutionary model of development in which the Israelite religion is radically discontinuous with Ancient Near Eastern culture. At stake in this debate is whether the religion of the Hebrew Bible is really the religion of ancient Israel.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Bible as a Product of Religious and Cultural Revolution
08:16 - Chapter 2. Kaufman's Characterization of Pagan Religion
22:16 - Chapter 3. Kaufman's Characterization of One Sovereign God
35:13 - Chapter 4. Continuity or Radical Break?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Bible Contradictions

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Christine Hayes Lecture at CNS: "The 'Truth' About Torah"

Profession Christine Hayes came to Congregation Neveh Shalom to give two lectures as part of Rabbi Joshua Stampfer's Bible class.

In this lecture - The 'Truth About Torah - Professor Hayes asks, When and why did some ancient Jews begin to think of the Torah as conveying a single unchanging divine “truth” and when and why did other ancient Jews resist this new way of thinking? What was at stake in the truth wars of early Judaism and what lessons can be drawn for our own time?

Professor Christine Hayes of Yale University is the leading biblical scholar of our time. Her most recent book, What’s Divine about Divine Law?, received the 2015 National Jewish book Award and the 2016 Jordan Schnitzer Award from the Association of Judaic Studies.

Lecture 5. Critical Approaches to the Bible: Introduction to Genesis 12-50

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces the modern critical study of the Bible, including source theories and Wellhausen's Documentary Hypothesis, as well as form criticism and tradition criticism. The main characteristics of each biblical source (J, E, P, and D) according to classic source theory are explained. This lecture also raises the question of the historical accuracy of the Bible and the relation of archaeology to the biblical record.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Wellhausen's Documentary Hypothesis and Characteristics of Biblical Sources
16:05 - Chapter 2. The Purpose of Literary, Source and Historical Criticism
27:15 - Chapter 3. The Generations of the Patriarchs and Matriarchs
34:42 - Chapter 4. Critical Methodology Used in Biblical Scholarship

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

The Epic of Gilgamesh, Lecture by Andrew George

Andrew George, Professor of Babylonian, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London

The Epic of Gilgamesh is a 4,000-year-old Mesopotamian poem about a hero who embarks on an arduous quest to find the secret of immortality. Preserved on clay tablets in cuneiform script, it is generally considered to be the earliest great work of literature to survive from the ancient world. In this illustrated lecture, Andrew George, author of a prize-winning translation of the Epic of Gilgamesh, explores four themes related to this Babylonian masterpiece: the archaeology of the poem’s recovery, the reconstruction of its text, the story it tells, and its messages about life and death.

Presented in collaboration with the Departments of Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations and Comparative Literature, with the support of the Provostial Fund for the Arts and Humanities, Harvard University

Twisted: Myths and Truths of the Bible week 1

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2. From Stories to Canon

Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152)

The Christian faith is based upon a canon of texts considered to be holy scripture. How did this canon come to be? Different factors, such as competing schools of doctrine, growing consensus, and the invention of the codex, helped shape the canon of the New Testament. Reasons for inclusion in or exclusion from the canon included apostolic authority, general acceptance, and theological appropriateness for proto-orthodox Christianity.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Canon vs. Scripture
16:17 - Chapter 2. The Forming of Canons
27:04 - Chapter 3. The Invention of the Codex
32:50 - Chapter 4. A Slowly Developing (and Incomplete) Consensus
42:02 - Chapter 5. The Reasons for Canonical Inclusion and Exclusion

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Spring 2009.

review of evans.wmv

A video review of G.R. Evans' 'The Roots of the Reformation: Tradition, Emergence and Rupture.
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Seams YouTube video

Contradictions in the OT explained pt II

Contradictions in the OT explained pt II

Old Testament New Testament Contradictions ZenannM Reply

Video response to ZenannM regarding Old (Original) Testament and NewTestamess contradictions
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Lecture 21. Biblical Poetry: Psalms and Song of Songs

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

After a detailed explanation of the requirements for the paper assignment, Professor Hayes turns to the Writings - the third section of the Bible - and considers a recent approach to the study of the Bible, called canonical criticism. The books in this section of the Bible explore various questions associated with suffering and evil. An example is the book of Ecclesiastes which constitutes a second attack on the optimism and piety of conventional religious thinking. The lecture concludes with a discussion of a number of Psalms, their genre, purpose, and language.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Remarks for Final Paper
08:37 - Chapter 2. The Problem of Dating; Canonical Criticism
13:18 - Chapter 3. The Book of Ecclesiastes
25:52 - Chapter 4. Introduction to the Book of Psalms
34:40 - Chapter 5. Themes and Formal Characteristics in the Book of Psalms

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 19. Literary Prophecy: Perspectives on the Exile (Jeremiah, Ezekiel and 2nd Isaiah)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The destruction of Jerusalem challenged the faith of the nation. What was the meaning of this event and how could such tremendous evil and suffering be reconciled with the nature of God himself? Professor Hayes shows how Israel's prophets attempted to answer this question, turning the nation's defeat and despair into an occasion for renewing faith in Israel's God. The lecture continues with an in-depth study of the book of Ezekiel. Ezekiel's denunciations of Jerusalem are among the most lurid and violent in the Bible and he concludes that destruction is the only possible remedy. Ezekiel's visions include God's withdrawal from Jerusalem to be with his people in exile, and his ultimate return. Ezekiel's use of dramatic prophetic signs, his rejection of collective divine punishment and assertion of individual responsibility are discussed. The last part of the lecture turns to Second Isaiah and the famous servant songs that find a universal significance in Israel's suffering.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Structure and Tone of the Book of Ezekiel
09:53 - Chapter 2. Ezekiel's Denunciations of Jerusalem and Rejection of Collective Punishment
17:54 - Chapter 3. The Sometimes Contradictory Nature of the Biblical Text
21:39 - Chapter 4. Ezekiel's Interpretation of the Final Destruction of Jerusalem
31:58 - Chapter 5.Major Themes in Second Isaiah
38:00 - Chapter 6. Second Isaiah's Servant Songs

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 14. The Deuteronomistic History: Response to Catastrophe (1 and 2 Kings)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

The tension between covenant theology, emphasizing the conditional Mosaic convenant from Mt. Sinai, and royal theology emphasizing the unconditional covenant with David in his palace on Mt. Zion, is traced. Following Solomon's death, the united kingdom separated into a northern and a southern kingdom (named Israel and Judah respectively), the former falling to the Assyrians in 722 and the latter to the Babylonians in 586. Analysis of the Deuteronomistic School's response to these historical crises and subsequent exile to Babylonia is evidenced through redaction criticism.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Uncompromising Honesty of the Story of David
10:29 - Chapter 2. Tensions in Kings I and II
31:21 - Chapter 3. The Separation of the Kingdom Following Solomon's Death
42:10 - Chapter 4. Historiosophy of the Deuteronomistic School

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 10. Biblical Law: The Three Legal Corpora of JE (Exodus), P (Leviticus and Numbers) and D

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture introduces biblical law in a comparative approach that identifies similarities and differences between Israelite law and other Ancient Near Eastern legal traditions, such as the Code of Hammurabi. Distinctive features of Israelite law are explained as flowing from the claim of divine authorship.

00:00 - Chapter 1. The Initiation of God's Laws, Rules and Ordinances at Sinai
03:38 - Chapter 2. The Decalogues
11:42 - Chapter 3. Biblical Law in Comparison with Ancient Near East Legal Collections
29:58 - Chapter 4. Radical, Characteristic Features of Israelite Law
40:17 - Chapter 5. Reversing the Code: Sanctity of Human Life

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Lecture 8. Exodus: From Egypt to Sinai (Exodus 5-24, 32; Numbers)

Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (RLST 145) with Christine Hayes

This lecture traces the account of the Exodus (and the origin of the Passover festival as a historicization of older nature festivals) and Israel's liberation from bondage under Pharaoh. The story reaches its climax with the covenant concluded between God and Israel through Moses at Sinai. Drawing heavily on the work of Jon Levenson, the lecture examines Ancient Near Eastern parallels to the Sinaitic covenant and describes the divine-human relationship (an intersection of law and love) that the covenant seeks to express.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Passover as a Historicization of Earlier Ritual Practices
06:51 - Chapter 2. The Exodus as a Paradigm for Collective Salvation
19:59 - Chapter 3. The Mosaic Covenant between God and Israel at Sinai
39:15 - Chapter 4. Patience with the Israelites: Towards the Promised Land

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

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