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Lectures - James Charlesworth and Lee McDonald - HOW THE BIBLE CAME INTO BEING

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Lectures - James Charlesworth and Lee McDonald - HOW THE BIBLE CAME INTO BEING

Lectures - James Charlesworth and Lee McDonald - HOW THE BIBLE CAME INTO BEING – March 4, 2017, 6:30 – 9:00 p.m.  

Charlesworth – “The Theological Value of the ‘Rejected Texts’ and Dead Sea Scrolls for Understanding Jesus”  

This lecture will challenge the assumption that the books of the so-called Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha are of no value or that they are “false” and “heretical.”  Such a jaundiced view fails to see their value, even if excluded from most Christian Bibles.  Some of these books were sacred for communities of faith and they shed important light on the theology and interpretation being explored and debated among Jews and Christians at the end of the Second Temple period.  This lecture will help us understand that these books are of great importance in our study of this world-changing period.

McDonald – “Why and When Was Scripture Written?  Looking at the New Testament Writings”

This lecture will explore the factors involved in the development of the biblical canon.  To appreciate this development with nuance, it is necessary to inquire into the motivations for the writing of the books that in time were recognized as authoritative and canonical, as well as the writing of the books that in time were not recognized by the majority as authoritative.  It is also important to consider when and how these decisions were made, with regard to both the Old Testament and the New Testament.

Given 6:30pm - 9pm on Saturday March 4, 2017 at The Lanier Theological Library Chapel in Houston, Texas. It is part of the Lanier Library Lecture Series. A series devoted to bringing world class lectures to benefit the community of all those who might be interested.

I am indebted to the generosity of the library to allow me to share these videos of theirs. Please support them by visiting their website for more information and resources:



Bio Info: James H. Charlesworth

James H. Charlesworth earned his Ph.D. at Duke Divinity School. Since 1984 he has served as the George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Princeton Theological Seminary. He has also taught at the Hebrew University and W. F. Albright Institute, both in Jerusalem, at Naples University in Italy, and at the Pontificia Universita Gregoriana in Rome. His major publications include The Odes of Solomon: The Syriac Texts, Jesus Within Judaism, The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament, The Bible and the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Jesus and Archaeology.

Professor Charlesworth is well known for his pioneering work in the ancient literature outside the Jewish and Christian canons of Scripture. He specializes in the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old and New Testaments, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Josephus, Jesus research, and the Gospel of John. He has published extensively in the areas of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Jesus and his world. He also participated in several archaeological excavations in Israel and is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and the Society of New Testament Studies. An ordained minister in The United Methodist Church, he serves as advisor to the denomination’s World Missionary Council and preaches and lectures globally.

Bio Info: Lee Martin McDonald

Lee Martin McDonald earned his Th.M at Harvard Divinity School and his Ph.D. at the University of Edinburgh. He is Emeritus President and Professor of New Testament Studies at Acadia Divinity College, and Dean of the Faculty of Theology, Acadia University in Nova Scotia (1999-2007). He taught New Testament at the North American Baptist Seminary in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He led several study tours in Greece, Turkey, Jordan, Egypt, and Israel, and served as Visiting Professor at both Princeton Theological Seminary and Chapman University. He also served as senior pastor in three American Baptist Churches and as a U.S. Army Reserve Chaplain. He has also served as Adjunct Professor of Biblical Studies at Arizona State University and Fuller Theological Seminary.

Dr. McDonald is well known for his work in the area of the formation of the Christian biblical canon of Scripture, an area in which he has published extensively. He served for six years as the President of the Institute for Biblical Research and is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and the Society of New Testament Studies. He is the author/editor of 20 books and over 100 articles and essays on New Testament subjects, including The Biblical Canon: Its Origin, Transmission, and Authority; The Canon Debate; Forgotten Scriptures; and Early Christianity and its Sacred Literature.

Both Lecturers (Q&A only) - James Charlesworth and Lee McDonald - HOW THE BIBLE CAME INTO BEING

Lectures - James Charlesworth and Lee McDonald - HOW THE BIBLE CAME INTO BEING – March 4, 2017, 6:30 – 9:00 p.m.

1st Lecture Charlesworth – “The Theological Value of the ‘Rejected Texts’ and Dead Sea Scrolls for Understanding Jesus”

This lecture will challenge the assumption that the books of the so-called Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha are of no value or that they are “false” and “heretical.” Such a jaundiced view fails to see their value, even if excluded from most Christian Bibles. Some of these books were sacred for communities of faith and they shed important light on the theology and interpretation being explored and debated among Jews and Christians at the end of the Second Temple period. This lecture will help us understand that these books are of great importance in our study of this world-changing period.

2nd Lecture McDonald – “Why and When Was Scripture Written? Looking at the New Testament Writings”

This lecture will explore the factors involved in the development of the biblical canon. To appreciate this development with nuance, it is necessary to inquire into the motivations for the writing of the books that in time were recognized as authoritative and canonical, as well as the writing of the books that in time were not recognized by the majority as authoritative. It is also important to consider when and how these decisions were made, with regard to both the Old Testament and the New Testament.

Given 6:30pm - 9pm on Saturday March 4, 2017 at The Lanier Theological Library Chapel in Houston, Texas. It is part of the Lanier Library Lecture Series. A series devoted to bringing world class lectures to benefit the community of all those who might be interested.

I am indebted to the generosity of the library to allow me to share these videos of theirs. Please support them by visiting their website for more information and resources:



Bio Info: James H. Charlesworth

James H. Charlesworth earned his Ph.D. at Duke Divinity School. Since 1984 he has served as the George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Princeton Theological Seminary. He has also taught at the Hebrew University and W. F. Albright Institute, both in Jerusalem, at Naples University in Italy, and at the Pontificia Universita Gregoriana in Rome. His major publications include The Odes of Solomon: The Syriac Texts, Jesus Within Judaism, The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament, The Bible and the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Jesus and Archaeology.

Professor Charlesworth is well known for his pioneering work in the ancient literature outside the Jewish and Christian canons of Scripture. He specializes in the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old and New Testaments, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Josephus, Jesus research, and the Gospel of John. He has published extensively in the areas of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Jesus and his world. He also participated in several archaeological excavations in Israel and is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and the Society of New Testament Studies. An ordained minister in The United Methodist Church, he serves as advisor to the denomination’s World Missionary Council and preaches and lectures globally.

Bio Info: Lee Martin McDonald

Lee Martin McDonald earned his Th.M at Harvard Divinity School and his Ph.D. at the University of Edinburgh. He is Emeritus President and Professor of New Testament Studies at Acadia Divinity College, and Dean of the Faculty of Theology, Acadia University in Nova Scotia (1999-2007). He taught New Testament at the North American Baptist Seminary in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He led several study tours in Greece, Turkey, Jordan, Egypt, and Israel, and served as Visiting Professor at both Princeton Theological Seminary and Chapman University. He also served as senior pastor in three American Baptist Churches and as a U.S. Army Reserve Chaplain. He has also served as Adjunct Professor of Biblical Studies at Arizona State University and Fuller Theological Seminary.

Dr. McDonald is well known for his work in the area of the formation of the Christian biblical canon of Scripture, an area in which he has published extensively. He served for six years as the President of the Institute for Biblical Research and is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and the Society of New Testament Studies. He is the author/editor of 20 books and over 100 articles and essays on New Testament subjects, including The Biblical Canon: Its Origin, Transmission, and Authority; The Canon Debate; Forgotten Scriptures; and Early Christianity and its Sacred Literature.
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2nd Lecture (only) - Lee McDonald - HOW THE BIBLE CAME INTO BEING

Lectures - James Charlesworth and Lee McDonald - HOW THE BIBLE CAME INTO BEING – March 4, 2017, 6:30 – 9:00 p.m.  

2nd Lecture McDonald – “Why and When Was Scripture Written?  Looking at the New Testament Writings”

This lecture will explore the factors involved in the development of the biblical canon.  To appreciate this development with nuance, it is necessary to inquire into the motivations for the writing of the books that in time were recognized as authoritative and canonical, as well as the writing of the books that in time were not recognized by the majority as authoritative.  It is also important to consider when and how these decisions were made, with regard to both the Old Testament and the New Testament.

1st Lecture Charlesworth – “The Theological Value of the ‘Rejected Texts’ and Dead Sea Scrolls for Understanding Jesus”  

This lecture will challenge the assumption that the books of the so-called Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha are of no value or that they are “false” and “heretical.”  Such a jaundiced view fails to see their value, even if excluded from most Christian Bibles.  Some of these books were sacred for communities of faith and they shed important light on the theology and interpretation being explored and debated among Jews and Christians at the end of the Second Temple period.  This lecture will help us understand that these books are of great importance in our study of this world-changing period.

Given 6:30pm - 9pm on Saturday March 4, 2017 at The Lanier Theological Library Chapel in Houston, Texas. It is part of the Lanier Library Lecture Series. A series devoted to bringing world class lectures to benefit the community of all those who might be interested.

I am indebted to the generosity of the library to allow me to share these videos of theirs. Please support them by visiting their website for more information and resources:




Bio Info: Lee Martin McDonald

Lee Martin McDonald earned his Th.M at Harvard Divinity School and his Ph.D. at the University of Edinburgh. He is Emeritus President and Professor of New Testament Studies at Acadia Divinity College, and Dean of the Faculty of Theology, Acadia University in Nova Scotia (1999-2007). He taught New Testament at the North American Baptist Seminary in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He led several study tours in Greece, Turkey, Jordan, Egypt, and Israel, and served as Visiting Professor at both Princeton Theological Seminary and Chapman University. He also served as senior pastor in three American Baptist Churches and as a U.S. Army Reserve Chaplain. He has also served as Adjunct Professor of Biblical Studies at Arizona State University and Fuller Theological Seminary.

Dr. McDonald is well known for his work in the area of the formation of the Christian biblical canon of Scripture, an area in which he has published extensively. He served for six years as the President of the Institute for Biblical Research and is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and the Society of New Testament Studies. He is the author/editor of 20 books and over 100 articles and essays on New Testament subjects, including The Biblical Canon: Its Origin, Transmission, and Authority; The Canon Debate; Forgotten Scriptures; and Early Christianity and its Sacred Literature.


Bio Info: James H. Charlesworth

James H. Charlesworth earned his Ph.D. at Duke Divinity School. Since 1984 he has served as the George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Princeton Theological Seminary. He has also taught at the Hebrew University and W. F. Albright Institute, both in Jerusalem, at Naples University in Italy, and at the Pontificia Universita Gregoriana in Rome. His major publications include The Odes of Solomon: The Syriac Texts, Jesus Within Judaism, The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament, The Bible and the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Jesus and Archaeology.

Professor Charlesworth is well known for his pioneering work in the ancient literature outside the Jewish and Christian canons of Scripture. He specializes in the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old and New Testaments, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Josephus, Jesus research, and the Gospel of John. He has published extensively in the areas of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Jesus and his world. He also participated in several archaeological excavations in Israel and is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and the Society of New Testament Studies. An ordained minister in The United Methodist Church, he serves as advisor to the denomination’s World Missionary Council and preaches and lectures globally.

1st Lecture (only) - James Charlesworth - HOW THE BIBLE CAME INTO BEING

Lectures - James Charlesworth and Lee McDonald - HOW THE BIBLE CAME INTO BEING – March 4, 2017, 6:30 – 9:00 p.m.  

1st Lecture Charlesworth – “The Theological Value of the ‘Rejected Texts’ and Dead Sea Scrolls for Understanding Jesus”  

This lecture will challenge the assumption that the books of the so-called Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha are of no value or that they are “false” and “heretical.”  Such a jaundiced view fails to see their value, even if excluded from most Christian Bibles.  Some of these books were sacred for communities of faith and they shed important light on the theology and interpretation being explored and debated among Jews and Christians at the end of the Second Temple period.  This lecture will help us understand that these books are of great importance in our study of this world-changing period.

2nd Lecture McDonald – “Why and When Was Scripture Written?  Looking at the New Testament Writings”

This lecture will explore the factors involved in the development of the biblical canon.  To appreciate this development with nuance, it is necessary to inquire into the motivations for the writing of the books that in time were recognized as authoritative and canonical, as well as the writing of the books that in time were not recognized by the majority as authoritative.  It is also important to consider when and how these decisions were made, with regard to both the Old Testament and the New Testament.

Given 6:30pm - 9pm on Saturday March 4, 2017 at The Lanier Theological Library Chapel in Houston, Texas. It is part of the Lanier Library Lecture Series. A series devoted to bringing world class lectures to benefit the community of all those who might be interested.

I am indebted to the generosity of the library to allow me to share these videos of theirs. Please support them by visiting their website for more information and resources:



Bio Info: James H. Charlesworth

James H. Charlesworth earned his Ph.D. at Duke Divinity School. Since 1984 he has served as the George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Princeton Theological Seminary. He has also taught at the Hebrew University and W. F. Albright Institute, both in Jerusalem, at Naples University in Italy, and at the Pontificia Universita Gregoriana in Rome. His major publications include The Odes of Solomon: The Syriac Texts, Jesus Within Judaism, The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament, The Bible and the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Jesus and Archaeology.

Professor Charlesworth is well known for his pioneering work in the ancient literature outside the Jewish and Christian canons of Scripture. He specializes in the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old and New Testaments, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Josephus, Jesus research, and the Gospel of John. He has published extensively in the areas of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Jesus and his world. He also participated in several archaeological excavations in Israel and is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and the Society of New Testament Studies. An ordained minister in The United Methodist Church, he serves as advisor to the denomination’s World Missionary Council and preaches and lectures globally.

Bio Info: Lee Martin McDonald

Lee Martin McDonald earned his Th.M at Harvard Divinity School and his Ph.D. at the University of Edinburgh. He is Emeritus President and Professor of New Testament Studies at Acadia Divinity College, and Dean of the Faculty of Theology, Acadia University in Nova Scotia (1999-2007). He taught New Testament at the North American Baptist Seminary in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He led several study tours in Greece, Turkey, Jordan, Egypt, and Israel, and served as Visiting Professor at both Princeton Theological Seminary and Chapman University. He also served as senior pastor in three American Baptist Churches and as a U.S. Army Reserve Chaplain. He has also served as Adjunct Professor of Biblical Studies at Arizona State University and Fuller Theological Seminary.

Dr. McDonald is well known for his work in the area of the formation of the Christian biblical canon of Scripture, an area in which he has published extensively. He served for six years as the President of the Institute for Biblical Research and is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and the Society of New Testament Studies. He is the author/editor of 20 books and over 100 articles and essays on New Testament subjects, including The Biblical Canon: Its Origin, Transmission, and Authority; The Canon Debate; Forgotten Scriptures; and Early Christianity and its Sacred Literature.
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In Search of Christian Origins by James Charlesworth

An excerpt from the DVD lecture series In Search of Christian Origins by James Charlesworth, produced by the Biblical Archaeology Society.
For more information, please visit:
For more on Biblical Archaeology, see BAS at

Taught by the engaging and dynamic James H. Charlesworth of Princeton Theological Seminary, these ten thought-provoking lectures, created especially for readers of Biblical Archaeology Review, focus on two key questions for the study of Early Christianity:
How did the Palestinian Jesus Movement develop within the vibrant but highly factionalized world of Second Temple Judaism?
And how did this once obscure and insignificant sect evolve into a movement that was able to not only expand far beyond its Jewish roots, but also become the dominant religion of the Roman Empire under Constantine the Great?
In Search of Christian Origins presents a thorough overview of the history of Early Christianity from its beginnings as an obscure Jewish sect in first-century C.E. Israel-Palestine to its dramatic ascension as the religion of the Roman Empire in the fourth century.
THE LECTURES:
- The Jewish Context of Jesus
- The Many Faces of Second Temple Judaism
- Jesus and the Dead Sea Scrolls
- Jesus and His Judaism
- Jesus' Death and Resurrection
- Paul and the Reinterpretation of Jesus' Message
- Jewish Factionalism and the Early Gospels
- The Emergence of Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism
- The Quest for Orthodoxy: The Gnostic Challenge
- The Quest for Orthodoxy: The Final Debates

BONUS LECTURE:
- Ancient Treasures from the World of Jesus

Supplementary Course Materials in PDF format on CD This supplementary PDF has the required text for the course, lists of suggested readings, informative summaries and key questions, plus maps, timelines and a glossary.

Seminar - Writing and Scribal Techniques in Early Israel

This Seminar was held Friday November 2, 2012 in connection with the Lecture given by Dr Alan Millard - on 11/03/12 at the Lanier Theological Library in Houston, TX
Topic: Did Moses know the alphabet? Was there writing in ancient Israel?

Lecture with Dr. Alan Millard (lecture only)


Lecture with Dr. Alan Millard (Responses only)


Lecture with Dr. Alan Millard (QA only)


Seminar contributors:

Dr James Hoffmeier, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Egyptian Influence on Hebrew Scribal Practice

Bill Schniedewind, Kershaw Chair of Ancient Eastern Mediterranean Studies UCLA,
Writing and King Solomon's Administration

Ron Tappy, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary,
Abracadabra: A Writer's Tenth-Century Toolkit

Dr Alan Millard, University of Liverpool, Respondent

Dr Emanuel Tov, Hebrew University, Writing at Qumran

Mark Lanier, Lawyer & Library Founder. Parting Words and Dismissal

For more infomation on the Lanier Theological Library:
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Welcome to Israel Bible Center

CSI: Canon of Scripture - Lecture 3 - "The New Testament"

Interview with James H. Charlesworth

James H. Charlesworth is the editor of The Tomb of Jesus and His Family? Exploring Ancient Jewish Tombs Near Jerusalem's Walls


In 1980 archaeologists unearthed a tomb near Jerusalem that contained a family's ossuaries inscribed with somefamiliar New Testament names, including Mary, Joseph, and Jesus. In 2007 the Discovery Channel produced and broadcast a documentary called The Lost Tomb of Jesus, raisinginterest — and controversy — among the public and specialists alike. Could this actually be the tomb of Jesus and his family?

In January 2008 an international congress of scholars met in Jersualem to discuss this question. This volume presents their findings. Covering the archaeological facts about this discovery, Jewish burial customs during the late Second Temple period, first-century inscriptions, the Talpiot tomb, the James ossuary, the Holy Sepulcher, Hazon Gabriel, and beliefs about burial and the afterlife within Second Temple Judaism, these essays offer expert perspectives on a much-publicized topic.

James H. Charlesworth is George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature and director of the Dead Sea Scrolls Project at Princeton Theological Seminary. He has authored or edited over sixty books.

Video credits:
Interviewer: Rachel Bomberger
Filmed and edited by Ahna Ziegler

Introducing "The Story of Jesus in History and Faith" -- Lee Martin McDonald

Lee Martin McDonald describes his new book, The Story of Jesus in History and Faith (Baker Academic, 2013). Find out more at
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Hayward (special edition) 2006 lecture 5: Lee McDonald

A special edition of the Hayward Lectures: Apr 1, 2006
Exploring the Origins of the Bible
Lecture 5: Dr. Lee M. McDonald

Church History Literacy - Chapter 2: 1 Clement

Biblical Literacy Class recorded 01-11-2015. More info on Biblical Literacy Class: For Resources handouts etc:

Mark Lanier teacher. Champion Forest Baptist Church. Church History the subject.
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James H. Charlesworth on "Jesus' Last Passover Devotion and Worship in the Temple that Jesus Knew"

James H. Charlesworth on Jesus' Last Passover Devotion and Worship in the Temple that Jesus Knew at the conference Passion & Passover: Jesus & Temple, which took place on March 30, 2015, at BYU in Provo, Utah.

See here for more information:

Panel discussion and audience questions following James H. Charlesworth

Panel discussion and audience questions following James H. Charlesworth at the conference Passion & Passover: Jesus & Temple, which took place on March 30, 2015, at BYU in Provo, Utah.

See here for more information:

Israel and Jordan, August to September, 2015 (with Dr. James Charlesworth)

Israel and Jordan, August to September, 2015 (with Dr. James Charlesworth)
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Introduction to The New Testament, Lecture 3

Provided by Emmaus Bible College, Australia, this is a series of lectures overviewing the New Testament

Lecture - Lanier Theological Library presents: Michael Card - Four Portraits of Jesus

Lecture by Michael Card “Four Portraits of Jesus” given October 29, 2016 at the Lanier Theological Library in Houston, TX.

It is part of the Lanier Library Lecture Series. A series devoted to bringing world class lectures to benefit the community of all those who might be interested.

I am indebted to the generosity of the library to allow me to share these videos of theirs. Please support them by visiting their website for more information and resources:



Lecture by Michael Card “Four Portraits of Jesus”

The New Testament begins with the four Gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. Each was written by a different author to a different readership initially, but now we can read all four and compare them carefully. This lecture examines the nuances between the four as each gives a portrait of Jesus. Each portrait relates to the uniqueness of the author and the life situation to which it was written. This lecture shows that these portraits are part of the perfection of the Scriptures.

Bio info:

In a career that spans 30 years, Michael Card has recorded over 33 albums, authored or co-authored over 25 books, hosted a radio program, and written for a wide range of magazines. While he has penned such favorites as “El Shaddai,” “Love Crucified Arose,” and “Emmanuel,” he never imagined selling more than 4 million albums or writing over 19 #1 hits. The popularity of his work seemed a stark contrast to his goal in life, simply and quietly to teach the Bible.

Although music provided him the opportunity to share insight gained through extensive research, writing songs alone limited what he felt called to share. Card would frequently agonize over having to condense the vast depth and richness of Scripture into a three minute song. And so he fell, quite naturally, into the field of book writing where he has garnered numerous awards.

“Thomas Merton said, ‘The least of learning is done in the classroom,’ and he is so right,” says Card. “The bulk of what I’ve learned whether academically, musically, or personally is through interacting with people, which is why I think community is so important to our growth as Christians.”

In everything he does, Card seeks to encourage his audience to join in his own journey to know and be known by God by asking questions and entering into meaningful discussion with one another. Card’s vision is to edify the body of Christ around the world by sharing experiences and resources in the context of community in the various mediums he uses today. Whether it’s through his writings, concerts, or teaching, the core of what binds these seemingly diverse endeavors together is biblical community. It is at the heart of everything Michael Card does.

Michael is a graduate of Western Kentucky University, where he earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Biblical Studies. Michael has also received honorary PhD’s in music and Christian education from Whitfield Seminary and Philadelphia Biblical University.

Michael lives in Franklin, Tennessee, where, with a group of close friends, he pursues racial reconciliation and neighborhood renewal.

He and his wife, Susan, have four children

Introducing "The World of the New Testament" -- Lee Martin McDonald

Lee Martin McDonald describes the new book he has coedited with Joel B. Green, The World of the New Testament: Cultural, Social, and Historical Contexts (Baker Academic, 2013). Find out more at

Seminar - Historical and Archaeological Evidence for the Jewish Diaspora After 722 B.C.

Seminar - Historical and Archaeological Evidence for the Jewish Diaspora After 722 B.C.

The Lanier Theological Library is inviting scholars and patrons to a free seminar on Friday, January 16, 2015 from 2:00 – 5:00 p.m., in our chapel. This seminar precedes and ties in well with the library's lecture on the next day by Rabbi Benjamin Scolnic, “The Book of Daniel and the Nature of Biblical Truth.”

This 3-hour session features the six presenters and presentations below.

K. Lawson Younger (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School)
“Israelites and Judahites in Assyria and Babylon in Cuneiform Sources”

James K. Hoffmeier (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School)
“Judeans in Egypt after the Fall of Jerusalem in 586 B.C.”

Richard Hawes (Archaeology Forum, Tyndale House Cambridge)
“Did Edom Annex Parts of Southern Judah Following the Fall of Jerusalem in 567/8 B.C.”

Benjamin Scolnic (Southern Connecticut State University)
“The Book of Daniel and Modern Theories about the Persecution that led to the Story of Hanukkah”

Gary Rendsburg (Rutgers University)
“Septuagint, Synagogue, and Symbiosis: The Jews of Hellenistic Egypt”

Thomas W. Davis (Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary)
“Jews in Cyprus in Hellenistic Times”

James Charlesworth

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