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Micro-Biology: Crash Course History of Science #24

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Micro-Biology: Crash Course History of Science #24

It's all about the SUPER TINY in this episode of Crash Course: History of Science. In it, Hank Green talks about germ theory, John Snow (the other one), pasteurization, and why following our senses isn't always the worst idea.

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Mark Brouwer, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Satya Ridhima Parvathaneni, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Ian Dundore
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Genetics - Lost and Found: Crash Course History of Science #25

Sometimes trail blazers of science aren't famous like Darwin or Pasteur. Sometimes they're humble Abbots, just growing peas in the back of their Abbey. This is the story of Gregor Mendel and how his work was done, lost, then found again.

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Thermodynamics: Crash Course History of Science #26

It's time to heat things up! LITERALLY! It's time for Hank to talk about the history of Thermodynamics!!! It's messy and there are a lot of people who came up with some ideas that worked and other that didn't and then some ideas that should have come first actually were figured out second.

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Mark Brouwer, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Satya Ridhima Parvathaneni, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Ian Dundore
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The Mind/Brain: Crash Course History of Science #30

Scientists in the nineteenth century discovered a lot about life and matter. But exactly what kind of stuff is the human brain? That one was—and is—tricky.

The brain sciences—with experiments and therapies tied to biological theories of the body—emerged in the nineteenth century and came into their own in the early twentieth.

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Biology Before Darwin: Crash Course History of Science #19

You’ve probably heard of Charles Darwin, but before we get to him, you really need to understand how different people, throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, tried to answer the same question: “what is life?”


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Mark Brouwer, Erika & Alexa Saur Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters
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Crash Course Microbiology

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#microbiology #crashcourse

Microbiology, along with mathematics, chemistry, and physics, is one of the fundamental branches of basic sciences. The knowledge and detailed study of microorganisms and their functions can establish its use in a variety of applications, from medical, food and environmental, agricultural and industrial field.

Introduction to the Microbial World

It's time to learn about microorganisms! These are all the tiny little critters in the water, and the air, and in the ground, and inside you. We didn't even know they were there until a few hundred years ago, but once we started to learn about them, we started to figure out a lot of things about disease. Namely, that lots of diseases are caused by certain varieties of microorganisms, which we call pathogens. In this series we will set up some basic concepts in microbiology, and then we will go through a long list of pathogens, one by one, to learn about what diseases they cause, how they do it, and the methods we've developed to combat them!

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Air Travel and The Space Race: Crash Course History of Science #37

Like the Industrial or the Einsteinian Revolution, the Space Race is a trope, or way of organizing historical events into a story that makes sense. In this story, the two great powers that emerged after World War Two—the United States and Soviet Union—competed to send communications satellites, dogs, and people into outer space…

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Eric Prestemon, Sam Buck, Mark Brouwer, Bob Doye, Jennifer Killen, Naman Goel, Patrick Wiener II, Nathan Catchings, Efrain R. Pedroza, Brandon Westmoreland, dorsey, Indika Siriwardena, James Hughes, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Satya Ridhima Parvathaneni, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Jirat, Ian Dundore
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Cathedrals and Universities: Crash Course History of Science #11

Until roughly 1100, there were relatively few places of knowledge-making. Monasteries and abbeys had special rooms called scriptoria where monks copied manuscripts by hand. But the biggest places where knowledge was made were the Gothic cathedrals. Then Universities came along, too. This is the story of those two institutions!


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Mark Brouwer, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Steve Marshall
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The Scientific Revolution: Crash Course History of Science #12

So, what exactly is a scientific revolution? And are they more than just moments in time Historians use to mark the beginning and ending of things through time? In this episode we'll look into some ideas and people named Nick and how they fit into science and the search to understand ourselves and our place in the universe.


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Mark Brouwer, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Steve Marshall
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Electricity: Crash Course History of Science #27

The study of electricity goes all the way back to antiquity. But, by the time electricity started to become more well known, a few familiar names started to appear. Edison, Galvani, and a few others really changed the way the world worked.

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Biomaterials: Crash Course Engineering #24

We’ve talked about different materials engineers use to build things in the world, but there’s a special category of materials they turn to when building things to go inside our bodies. In this episode we’ll explore the world biomaterials like titanium and their coatings, the special chemistry of polyurethane, and the cross-linked structure of hydrogels. We’ll also look at the importance of safety & research, as well as the enormous future potential of biomaterials.

Crash Course Engineering is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios:

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Sam Buck, Mark Brouwer, James Hughes, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Satya Ridhima Parvathaneni, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Ian Dundore
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Genetics and The Modern Synthesis: Crash Course History of Science #35

Remember how Darwin and Mendel lived around the same time, but everyone forgot about Mendel until 1900, and even then biologists saw Darwinism and Mendelism as two competing grand theories about how life works?

Well, in this episode of Crash Course History of Science, we're going to bring everything together into a new Modern Biology!


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Eric Prestemon, Sam Buck, Mark Brouwer, Bob Doye, Jennifer Killen, Naman Goel, Patrick Wiener II, Nathan Catchings, Efrain R. Pedroza, Brandon Westmoreland, dorsey, Indika Siriwardena, James Hughes, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Satya Ridhima Parvathaneni, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Jirat, Ian Dundore
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The Limits of History: Crash Course History of Science #46

It's the final episode of our History of Science series and we thought it would be good to talk a little about some of the people we couldn't get to and some of the reasons we need to talk about diversity in scientists. Thanks for the journey, everyone!

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Old & Odd: Archaea, Bacteria & Protists - CrashCourse Biology #35

Hank veers away from human anatomy to teach us about the (mostly) single-celled organisms that make up two of the three taxonomic domains of life, and one of the four kingdoms: Archaea, Bacteria, and Protists. They are by far the most abundant organisms on Earth, and are our oldest, oddest relatives.

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Table of Contents
1) Archaea 03:23
a) Methanogens 04:02
b) Extremophiles 04:24

2) Bacteria 05:24:2
3) Gram Positive 06:50
a) Proteobacteria 07:15
b) Cyanobacteria 07:30
c) Spirochetes 07:42
d) Chlamydias 07:52

4) Protists 08:12
a) Protozoa 09:03
b) Algae 09:54
c) Slime Molds 11:13

crash course, biology, archaea, bacteria, protists, unicellular, life, origin, evolution, evolve, eukaryotic, prokaryotic, nucleus, cell membrane, cytoplasm, ribosome, DNA, chromosome, plasmid, extremophile, methanogen, hydrothermal vent, halophile, parasitic, antibiotic, immune system, horizontal gene transfer, diverse, gram staining, gram positive, proteobacteria, cyanobacteria, spirochete, chlamydia, protozoa, algae, dog vomit, slime mold, heterotrophic, flagella, cilia, amoeba, photosynthesis, diatom, sailor's eyeball, bubble algae, seaweed, green, red, brown Support CrashCourse on Patreon:
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Micro Biology Crash Course History of Science #24 1

Kochi postulaadid ja tema tähtsus ajaloos.

This video is a clip taken from another video that you see here:
All copyrights belong to CrashCourse channel.

Cinema, Radio, and Television: Crash Course History of Science #29

Radio, Cinema, and Television have been staples in news coverage, entertainment, and education for almost 100 years. But... where did they all come from? Who started what and when and why? In this episode, Hank Green talks to us about their birth and a dead elephant.

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Mark Brouwer, Kenneth F Penttinen, Trevin Beattie, Satya Ridhima Parvathaneni, Erika & Alexa Saur, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Ian Dundore
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interactive microbiology video

learn about the basics of microbes

HISTORY OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY

The medical microbiology had its origin in the year 1888 when the
Pasteur Institute in Paris (France) was established. Robert Koch
became the Director of the Institute For Infective Diseases. Both Louis
Pasteur and Robert Koch infused the spirit and interest to gain knowledge in
medical microbiology to the countrymen of America and Europe. The
medical microbiology deals with the aspects of infection, the causative agents
of infection and the diseases due to infection. Following the establishment of
Germ Theory of Diseases by Pasteur, innumerable infectious diseases that
haunt the human population were discovered. For most of these infectious
diseases, the drugs and vaccines have been found.
Pasteur, Koch, Lister :
Medical Microbiology involves the study of micro organisms that
colonize or infect human beings; the mechanism by which they cause
diseases; the body’s response to infection and specific antimicrobial
prevention and treatment.

The contribution of Louis pasteur (1822 - 1895) in France in the
field of microbiology lead to a greater understanding of human ailments and
animal diseases. Much of Pasteur’s work involved the growth of bacteria
and yeasts in liquid cultures. He developed methods of sterilization and of
pasteurization. Pasteur (1857) observed different kind of microbes
associated with different kinds of fermentation. e.g. Spheres of variable size
(yeast cells) within alcohol fermentation and smaller rods (Lactobacilli) with
lactic fermentation. This finding led Pasteur to state that specific microbe
may cause specific disease in man.
His crowning achievements were Pasteurisation of milk, the
development of techniques to reduce the virulence of infectious organism,
without eliminating their capacity to produce immunity. In this way he
developed vaccines, for the control of “cholera” “anthrax” and “rabies” in
man.


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Pioneers in Microbiology

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