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Milky Way build black hole or black hole build Milky Way

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Milky Way build black hole or black hole build Milky Way

Same program in 720p😎🤔

1:---- Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 1
2:----Did black hole build Milky Way Part 2||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 2:-
3:----Did black hole build Milky Way Part 3||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 3
4:----Did black hole build Milky Way Part 4||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 4


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#Milkeyway #Blackhole #planets #Howtheuniverseworksinhindi #GRAVITY #SPACE #UNIVERSE #physicist #relativity #quantummechanics #science #quantumtheory #space #spacetime #quantumgravity #quantumphysics #entangle #cosmology #universe #space #solarsystem #planet

Did a Black Hole Create the Milky Way?

To discover what created the Milky Way, scientists have to look back 13.6 billion years to the moments just after the Big Bang. | For more How the Universe Works, visit

Catch all new episodes of HOW THE UNIVERSE WORKS Wednesdays at 9/8c on Science Channel!

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Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1llक्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया llभाग 1

Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1llक्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया llभाग 2:-

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SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE (🕳) PART 1 IN HINDI

1:= Supermassive black hole part 2:=

2:=Supermassive black hole 3:=


3:=Supermassive black hole part 4:=

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Did black hole build Milky Way Part 4 ||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 4

1:--Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 1

2:-- Did black hole build Milky Way Part 2||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 2:-

3:--Did black hole build Milky Way Part 3||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 3:-

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How the Milky Way Got Its Stars

Do black holes create stars? There’s direct evidence that the ravenous appetite of a black hole sparks stars into life. | For more How the Universe Works, visit

Catch all new episodes of HOW THE UNIVERSE WORKS Wednesdays at 9/8c on Science Channel!

Subscribe to Science Channel! |

Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every day. |

Download the TestTube app! |
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Did black hole build Milky Way Part 3 ||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 3

1:- Did black hole build Milky Way Part 2||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 2:-

2:- Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 1

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What If All The Black Holes In The Universe Collided?

What If All The Black Holes In The Universe Collided?
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Black Holes… These monstrous and seemingly voids of black space suck in everything that gets too close to them; space dust, asteroids, planets, and even entire stars. The nearest one is 1,600 light-years from us. And in the region of the Universe visible from the Earth, there are perhaps 100 billion galaxies. Each one has around 100 million stellar-mass black holes in the center, ready to devour anything that gets close enough to its event horizon. But what would happen if all the black holes in the universe collided? Keep watching to find out.

There are so many black holes in the universe that it is impossible to count them, and there are even more we have not discovered.
If all of the known black holes were to collide together, it would be the end of the universe as we know it. Some of these stellar giants would be so massive that they would easily swallow smaller ones, and become even larger. And if these black holes were like ours and the ones inside the Andromeda galaxy, then you could imagine the incredible cosmic cataclysm if they all collided at once, perhaps creating a black hole so massive that it would suck in the entire universe. Entire stars would be stripped and sucked inside, planets ripped apart, collisions of planets and stars, those star collisions possibly creating more black holes. It would be a chain of cosmic destruction.

How to take a picture of a black hole | Katie Bouman

At the heart of the Milky Way, there's a supermassive black hole that feeds off a spinning disk of hot gas, sucking up anything that ventures too close -- even light. We can't see it, but its event horizon casts a shadow, and an image of that shadow could help answer some important questions about the universe. Scientists used to think that making such an image would require a telescope the size of Earth -- until Katie Bouman and a team of astronomers came up with a clever alternative. Bouman explains how we can take a picture of the ultimate dark using the Event Horizon Telescope.

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How to Build the Universe

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Scientific notes:
Stellar mass black holes vs. supermassive black holes
* Stellar mass black holes form from the collapse of massive stars at the ends of their lives, so they have roughly the same mass as a star. Supermassive black holes are physically identical to their smaller counterparts, except they are 10 thousand to a billion times the size of the sun. However, their formation is more of a mystery. They may form from the merging of smaller black holes.


Supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies
* Almost every large galaxy has a supermassive black hole at its center, but researchers are not yet sure ( why that’s the case, how they originate, and what their role is in the creation and evolution of galaxies.

Why are stars different colors?
* The color of a star depends on its temperature ( The hotter a star, the higher energy its light will be. Higher energy/temperature corresponds with the blue end of the visible spectrum and lower energy/temperature corresponds with the red end.

How does dark matter make stars spin faster?
* In the 1960s, astronomers Vera Rubin and Kent Ford noticed that stars at the edges of galaxies were moving just as fast as stars at the center, which surprised them: it appeared that the force of gravity causing stars to orbit the center of the galaxy was not weakening over distance. Their observation implied that something else, distributed throughout the galaxy, was exerting a gravitation pull. We now know that that “something else,” now named dark matter, accounts for about 85% of the matter in the universe. (It existence was inferred in the 1930s, when the astronomer Fritz Zwicky( noticed that galaxies in clusters were moving faster than they should.)

Size of the universe
* The universe is only 13.8 billion years old, but has a radius of about 46 billion light-years. If nothing can travel faster than the speed of light, how can that be? The expansion of the universe, driven by dark energy, is causing distances between objects to grow. Note that it is not moving those objects apart; rather, it is increasing the amount of space between them.

Cosmic webs
* Galaxies are not distributed randomly ( in space; instead, clusters of galaxies form web-like patterns. These webs consist of filaments, where dark matter and ordinary (baryonic) matter are concentrated, and voids, where galaxies are scarce. Researchers believe that these large-scale structures grew out of minor fluctuations in density at the beginning of the universe.

Composition of the early universe
* Moments after the Big Bang, the universe formed the nuclei for what would be come the universe’s hydrogen and helium atoms, with one helium nucleus for every 10 or 11 hydrogen ( When the first stars formed, there were no heavier elements — those elements formed inside stars.

String Theory Landscape
* The String Theory Landscape is a theory that the universe we live in is one of many universes. It attempts to explain how certain constants of nature seem “fine-tuned” for life, which contradicts the anthropic principle, or the notion that we humans hold a special place in the universe.

Disintegration of the universe
* In the future Degenerate Era of the universe, as space-time expands and stars burn up, all of the matter in stars will be consumed by black holes. But even black holes are not forever. Stephen Hawking theorized that black holes will slowly radiate away their mass in what is now called Hawking radiation until they too dissipate away.
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MEDIA CREDITS:
Music provided by APM
Sound effects: Freesound.org
Additional Animations:
- Galaxy within Universe: Edgeworx;
- Stars at center of Milky Way - NASA/NCSA University of Illinois Visualization by Frank Summers, Space Telescope Science Institute, Simulation by Martin White and Lars Hernquist, Harvard University

From the producers of PBS NOVA
© WGBH Educational Foundation
Funding provided by FQXi
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What If The Largest Blackhole Passed Between Milky Way and Andromeda?

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In this video, we will talk about effects of a huge blackhole passing between two galaxies.

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How to Build a Black Hole | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios

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Help translate our videos!

Black holes have mystified physicists for decades, but with the help of quantum mechanics, we are beginning to make serious progress in understanding these strange objects. This week on Space Time, Matt dives deeper into the physical process of creating a black hole, and what that can tell us about how black holes behave.

For a primer/refresher, be sure to check out our previous video on Black Holes:


Also, check out our friends over at The Good Stuff. They made a video about a man attempting to build an Alcubierre Drive in his garage!

______________________

Further Reading:

Pauli Exclusion Principle


Heisenburg Uncertainty Principle


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Comments:

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An Intermediate Mass Black Hole Found in the Milky Way. 100,000 Times the Mass of the Sun

Astronomers have been searching for mid-weight black holes, and now they’ve found one, right here in the Milky Way.

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Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com
Karla Thompson - @karlaii /
Chad Weber - weber.chad@gmail.com
Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001

I can’t believe my luck. Just last week as we were putting up our newest video about how smaller black holes combine into more and more massive black holes, leading up to supermassive black holes, astronomers announced one of the most important discoveries in black hole research in the last few years.

So, as I sometimes do, I’ve stopped the explainer video train to report on a very important piece of space news. And actually cover a topic that I’ve had in my queue for a while: the search for intermediate mass black holes.

Half news, half explainer. Enjoy.

Astronomers from Japan announced last week that they had discovered a black hole with 100,000 times the mass of the Sun, near the center of the Milky Way. This is one of the best observations ever made of a mysterious class of objects known as “intermediate mass black holes”, thought to be the building blocks of the much larger supermassive black holes we’ve come to know and love at the centers of galaxies.

The team used two radio telescopes, the Nobeyama 45-m Radio Telescope near Nagano, and the ASTE Telescope in Chile. They observed a giant cloud of gas 15 light-years across, located just 200 light-years away from Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way.

Gas clouds are common out there in the Universe, but what makes this one, unusual is how gas is zipping around within the cloud at vastly different speeds. Only something with a massive amount of gravity could hold it together like this.

They searched for pulsars and other compact objects that could hold it together, but their calculations indicated that only an object with 100,000 times the mass of the Sun could account for the behavior of the gas in the cloud.

We know there are stellar mass black holes. They form when stars with many times the mass of our Sun run out of fuel and die in a supernova explosion, leaving behind a black hole with a few times the mass of the Sun.

And we know there are supermassive black holes, with millions or even billions of times the mass of the Sun. When they’re actively feeding, they can blast out beams of radiation that outshine their entire galaxy.

But the missing link is how these supermassive black holes could have formed. You’d expect to see mergers across the Universe, with stellar mass black holes coming together into intermediate mass black holes, these merging together, and eventually leading up to supermassive black holes.

Although stellar and supermassive black holes have been found, it’s this in-between stage that has been elusive so far.

In fact, finding an object with 100,000 times the mass of the Sun, this close to the Milky Way’s supermassive black hole is actually twice the luck. If it’s this close to the heart of the Milky Way, it could be in the process of merging, building up the mass of Sagittarius A*, which would go from 4.1 million times the mass of the Sun to… 4.2 million times the mass of the Sun at some point in the distant future.

The news is reporting that this is the first time intermediate black holes have been found, but that’s not exactly true, it’s just that this is the best direct observation ever made.

SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BLACK (🕳) PART 2 IN HINDI

1:- supermassive black hole part 1

2:= Supermassive black hole part 3:=

3:= Supermassive black hole part 4 :=
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What If the Smallest Black Hole Entered the Solar System?

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In this video, we will talk about a hypothetical scenario of the smallest blackhole entering our solar system.

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Did black hole build Milky Way Part 2 ||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 2

Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1 ||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 1


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First Image of a Black Hole!

The Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration observed the supermassive black hole at the center of M87, finding the dark central shadow in accordance with General Relativity, further demonstrating the power of this 100 year-old theory.

To understand more about why the shadows look the way they do, check out:

I will continue updating this description with more links.

Event Horizon Telescope collaboration:

Animations and simulations with English text:
L. R. Weih & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


Video of observation of M87 courtesy of:
C. M. Fromm, Y. Mizuno & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


Video of observation of SgrA* courtesy of
C. M. Fromm, Y. Mizuno & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)
Z. Younsi (University College London)


Video of telescopes in the array 2017:
C. M. Fromm & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


Animations and simulations (no text):
L. R. Weih & L. Rezzolla (Goethe University Frankfurt)


Special thanks to Patreon supporters:
Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Ron Neal, Stan Presolski, Terrance Shepherd, Penward Rhyme

Scale animation by Maria Raykova

How many black holes are in the Milky Way?

Astronomers have detected 12 black holes around the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy.

What is a black hole and how do we detect them? Astronomer, Dhara Patel tells us more.

-------------------------------------------------------

The Royal Observatory is part of Royal Museums Greenwich which also incorporates the National Maritime Museum, Cutty Sark and the Queen's House, sharing stories from the sea to the stars.


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Classroom Aid - Black Hole Sagittarius A*



In this segment of our “How far away is it” video book, we cover the structure of the Milky Way galaxy.

We start with a high-level description of the three main components: the galactic center with its black hole, the galactic disk with its spiral arms, and the galactic halo stretching far out in all directions using the European Space Agency spacecraft Gaia’s findings. We also show how full images of the Milky Way can be created from within the galaxy.

Using the full power of the Hubble, Spitzer, and Chandra space telescopes, we take a deep dive into the center of our galaxy with its central bulge. We detail the evidence for the existence of a supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*, at the very center of the galaxy’s core. We cover and illustrate the work done by the UCLA Galactic Centre Group in conjunction with the new Keck observatory on top of the Mauna Kea volcano in Hawaii, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany and more recently and the European Southern Observatory with its array of Very Large Telescopes in Chile. This includes a look at how close the star S2 approached Sgr A* and what that black hole might look like. In addition, we cover stellar interferometry with ducks on a pond to see how these measurements were done.

Next, we go a level deeper into the nature of a Black Hole singularity. We cover the Schwarzschild radius, event horizon, accretion disk, gravitational lensing, and gamma-ray jets. We then actually build Sgr A*. In addition to the supermassive black hole, we take a look at a solar mass black hole.
We then cover the structure of the galactic disk including: the bar core, the two 3 Parsec arms, Scutum-Centaurus, Perseus, Sagittarius with its Orion Spur, Norma and the Outer Arm. We review the locations of various celestial objects we’ve seen in previous Milky Way segments, to show how close to us they are. We also cover the disk’s rotation and the Sun’s orbit. We look at our solar system’s Ecliptic Plane with respect to the galactic plane. And we cover the galaxy’s dust clouds and how we see them with radio astronomy. We also cover the galaxy’s rotation curve and its connection with dark matter.
Next, we cover the galactic halo. We start with Shapley’s globular cluster map that first showed that we were not at the center of the galaxy. We cover the size of the halo, the inner and outer halos orbital motion, and the newly discovered galaxy within our galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus. We end with recent discoveries of massive amounts of Hydrogen in the halo and this findings impact on the Dark Matter debate. And we end with a calculation of the entire Milky Way’s mass.
We end our galaxy coverage by illustrating how far one would have to go to take a picture that would include what we see in our illustrations. We conclude the chapter with another look at the distance ladder that took us across the galaxy.

@00:00 Beethoven, Ludwig van: Symphony No.9 in D minor Op.125, 'Choral' : III Adagio molto e cantabile; Daniel Barenboim & Staatskapelle Berlin; from the album “Beethoven : Symphonies Nos 1 - 9 & Overtures” 2004

@24:47 Tchaikovsky, Pyotr Ilyich: Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64; Bernard Haitink, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam, 2012

SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE (🕳) PART 3 IN HINDI

1= Supermassive black hole part 1:=

2= Supermassive black hole part 2:=

3:=Supermassive black hole part 4:=

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2:= black hole build milkey way or milkey way build black hole:=
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