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Milky Way build black hole or black hole build Milky Way

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Milky Way build black hole or black hole build Milky Way

Same program in 720p😎🤔

1:---- Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 1
2:----Did black hole build Milky Way Part 2||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 2:-
3:----Did black hole build Milky Way Part 3||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 3
4:----Did black hole build Milky Way Part 4||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 4


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#Milkeyway #Blackhole #planets #Howtheuniverseworksinhindi #GRAVITY #SPACE #UNIVERSE #physicist #relativity #quantummechanics #science #quantumtheory #space #spacetime #quantumgravity #quantumphysics #entangle #cosmology #universe #space #solarsystem #planet

Did a Black Hole Create the Milky Way?

To discover what created the Milky Way, scientists have to look back 13.6 billion years to the moments just after the Big Bang. | For more How the Universe Works, visit

Catch all new episodes of HOW THE UNIVERSE WORKS Wednesdays at 9/8c on Science Channel!

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Did black hole build Milky Way Part 4 ||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 4

1:--Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 1

2:-- Did black hole build Milky Way Part 2||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 2:-

3:--Did black hole build Milky Way Part 3||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 3:-

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Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1llक्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया llभाग 1

Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1llक्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया llभाग 2:-

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How the Universe Works Season 3 Episode 7 | Did A Black Hole Build The Milky Way

Did black hole build Milky Way Part 3 ||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 3

1:- Did black hole build Milky Way Part 2||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 2:-

2:- Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 1

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Classroom Aid - Our Place in the Milky Way xx



In this segment of our “How far away is it” video book, we cover the structure of the Milky Way galaxy.

We start with a high-level description of the three main components: the galactic center with its black hole, the galactic disk with its spiral arms, and the galactic halo stretching far out in all directions using the European Space Agency spacecraft Gaia’s findings. We also show how full images of the Milky Way can be created from within the galaxy.

Using the full power of the Hubble, Spitzer, and Chandra space telescopes, we take a deep dive into the center of our galaxy with its central bulge. We detail the evidence for the existence of a supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*, at the very center of the galaxy’s core. We cover and illustrate the work done by the UCLA Galactic Centre Group in conjunction with the new Keck observatory on top of the Mauna Kea volcano in Hawaii, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany and more recently and the European Southern Observatory with its array of Very Large Telescopes in Chile. This includes a look at how close the star S2 approached Sgr A* and what that black hole might look like. In addition, we cover stellar interferometry with ducks on a pond to see how these measurements were done.

Next, we go a level deeper into the nature of a Black Hole singularity. We cover the Schwarzschild radius, event horizon, accretion disk, gravitational lensing, and gamma-ray jets. We then actually build Sgr A*. In addition to the supermassive black hole, we take a look at a solar mass black hole.
We then cover the structure of the galactic disk including: the bar core, the two 3 Parsec arms, Scutum-Centaurus, Perseus, Sagittarius with its Orion Spur, Norma and the Outer Arm. We review the locations of various celestial objects we’ve seen in previous Milky Way segments, to show how close to us they are. We also cover the disk’s rotation and the Sun’s orbit. We look at our solar system’s Ecliptic Plane with respect to the galactic plane. And we cover the galaxy’s dust clouds and how we see them with radio astronomy. We also cover the galaxy’s rotation curve and its connection with dark matter.
Next, we cover the galactic halo. We start with Shapley’s globular cluster map that first showed that we were not at the center of the galaxy. We cover the size of the halo, the inner and outer halos orbital motion, and the newly discovered galaxy within our galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus. We end with recent discoveries of massive amounts of Hydrogen in the halo and this findings impact on the Dark Matter debate. And we end with a calculation of the entire Milky Way’s mass.
We end our galaxy coverage by illustrating how far one would have to go to take a picture that would include what we see in our illustrations. We conclude the chapter with another look at the distance ladder that took us across the galaxy.

How many black holes are in the Milky Way?

Astronomers have detected 12 black holes around the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy.

What is a black hole and how do we detect them? Astronomer, Dhara Patel tells us more.

-------------------------------------------------------

The Royal Observatory is part of Royal Museums Greenwich which also incorporates the National Maritime Museum, Cutty Sark and the Queen's House, sharing stories from the sea to the stars.


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How to Build a Black Hole | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios

Let’s build a black hole!

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Help translate our videos!

Black holes have mystified physicists for decades, but with the help of quantum mechanics, we are beginning to make serious progress in understanding these strange objects. This week on Space Time, Matt dives deeper into the physical process of creating a black hole, and what that can tell us about how black holes behave.

For a primer/refresher, be sure to check out our previous video on Black Holes:


Also, check out our friends over at The Good Stuff. They made a video about a man attempting to build an Alcubierre Drive in his garage!

______________________

Further Reading:

Pauli Exclusion Principle


Heisenburg Uncertainty Principle


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Comments:

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Did black hole build Milky Way Part 2 ||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 2

Did black hole build Milky Way Part 1 ||क्या ब्लैक होल ने आकाश गंगा को बनाया ।भाग 1


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SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE (🕳) PART 1 IN HINDI

1:= Supermassive black hole part 2:=

2:=Supermassive black hole 3:=


3:=Supermassive black hole part 4:=

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What If a Black Hole Entered Our Solar System?

Eight planets, hundreds of moons, hundreds of thousands of asteroids, and billions of comets orbiting our Sun make up our Solar System. And not once has a single black hole disturbed our planetary routine.

But what if it did? Would this uninvited guest swallow up everything on its way through the Solar System? Or would it just slightly disrupt it?

Transcript and sources:

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If you enjoy What If, make sure to check out our other channel Underknown:

Produced by Underknown in Toronto, What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure — grounded in scientific theory — through time, space and chance, as we ask what if some of the most fundamental aspects of our existence were different.

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Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it, we go nowhere. — Carl Sagan
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Classroom Aid - Black Hole Sagittarius A*



In this segment of our “How far away is it” video book, we cover the structure of the Milky Way galaxy.

We start with a high-level description of the three main components: the galactic center with its black hole, the galactic disk with its spiral arms, and the galactic halo stretching far out in all directions using the European Space Agency spacecraft Gaia’s findings. We also show how full images of the Milky Way can be created from within the galaxy.

Using the full power of the Hubble, Spitzer, and Chandra space telescopes, we take a deep dive into the center of our galaxy with its central bulge. We detail the evidence for the existence of a supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*, at the very center of the galaxy’s core. We cover and illustrate the work done by the UCLA Galactic Centre Group in conjunction with the new Keck observatory on top of the Mauna Kea volcano in Hawaii, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany and more recently and the European Southern Observatory with its array of Very Large Telescopes in Chile. This includes a look at how close the star S2 approached Sgr A* and what that black hole might look like. In addition, we cover stellar interferometry with ducks on a pond to see how these measurements were done.

Next, we go a level deeper into the nature of a Black Hole singularity. We cover the Schwarzschild radius, event horizon, accretion disk, gravitational lensing, and gamma-ray jets. We then actually build Sgr A*. In addition to the supermassive black hole, we take a look at a solar mass black hole.
We then cover the structure of the galactic disk including: the bar core, the two 3 Parsec arms, Scutum-Centaurus, Perseus, Sagittarius with its Orion Spur, Norma and the Outer Arm. We review the locations of various celestial objects we’ve seen in previous Milky Way segments, to show how close to us they are. We also cover the disk’s rotation and the Sun’s orbit. We look at our solar system’s Ecliptic Plane with respect to the galactic plane. And we cover the galaxy’s dust clouds and how we see them with radio astronomy. We also cover the galaxy’s rotation curve and its connection with dark matter.
Next, we cover the galactic halo. We start with Shapley’s globular cluster map that first showed that we were not at the center of the galaxy. We cover the size of the halo, the inner and outer halos orbital motion, and the newly discovered galaxy within our galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus. We end with recent discoveries of massive amounts of Hydrogen in the halo and this findings impact on the Dark Matter debate. And we end with a calculation of the entire Milky Way’s mass.
We end our galaxy coverage by illustrating how far one would have to go to take a picture that would include what we see in our illustrations. We conclude the chapter with another look at the distance ladder that took us across the galaxy.

@00:00 Beethoven, Ludwig van: Symphony No.9 in D minor Op.125, 'Choral' : III Adagio molto e cantabile; Daniel Barenboim & Staatskapelle Berlin; from the album “Beethoven : Symphonies Nos 1 - 9 & Overtures” 2004

@24:47 Tchaikovsky, Pyotr Ilyich: Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64; Bernard Haitink, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam, 2012

Darkmatter enigma part 4

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1:= Darkmatter enigma part 1:=

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SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE (🕳) PART 3 IN HINDI

1= Supermassive black hole part 1:=

2= Supermassive black hole part 2:=

3:=Supermassive black hole part 4:=

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Milky Way Black Hole Jets Confirmed; Fastest Brown Dwarfs Seen; Golden Age of Astronomy: SFN #120

Don't forget to check out the live ISON Hangout from Goddard and SDO, watch ISON pass around the Sun live:


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SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BLACK (🕳) PART 2 IN HINDI

1:- supermassive black hole part 1

2:= Supermassive black hole part 3:=

3:= Supermassive black hole part 4 :=
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Black Hole Rips And Whips Galactic Gas Cloud | Video

25,000 light years from Earth, at the center of our Milky Way Galaxy, a super-massive black hole has so distorted space-time that a cloud of gas, ripped from nearby stars, has stretched and accelerated to more than 1% the speed of light.

What Is A Quasar?

In this short video explainer, Universe Today publisher Fraser Cain investigates the most powerful objects in the Universe: quasars. In just the last few decades, our understanding of quasars has developed in leaps and bounds.

We now know what they are. And so will you.



--------------


I love it when scientists discover something unusual in nature.

They have no idea what it is, and then over decades of research, evidence builds, and scientists grow to understand what's going on..

My favorite example? Quasars.

Astronomers first knew they had a mystery on their hands in the nineteen-sixties (1960s) when they turned the first radio telescopes to the sky.

They detected the radio waves streaming off the Sun, the Milky Way and a few stars, but they also turned up bizarre objects they couldn't explain.

These objects were small and incredibly bright.

They named them quasi-stellar-objects or quasars, and then began to argue about what might be causing them.

The first was found to be moving away at more than a third the speed of light.

But was it really?

Maybe we were seeing the distortion of gravity from a black hole, or could it be the white hole end of a wormhole.

And If it was that fast, then it was really, really far... 4 billion light years away.

And it generating as much energy as an entire galaxy with a hundred billion stars.

What could do this?

Here's where Astronomers got creative.

Maybe quasars weren't really that bright, and it was our understanding of the size and expansion of the Universe that was wrong.

Or maybe we were seeing the results of a civilization, who had harnessed all stars in their galaxy into some kind of energy source.

Then in the 1980s, astronomers started to agree on the active galaxy theory as the source of quasars.

That, in fact, several different kinds of objects: quasars, blazars and radio galaxies were all the same thing, just seen from different angles.

And that some mechanism was causing galaxies to blast out jets of radiation from their cores.

But what was that mechanism?

We now know that all galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centers; some billions of times the mass of the Sun.

When material gets too close, it forms an accretion disk around the black hole.

It heats up to millions of degrees, blasting out an enormous amount of radiation.

The magnetic environment around the black hole forms twin jets of material which flow out into space for millions of light-years.

This is an AGN, an active galactic nucleus.

When the jets are perpendicular to our view, we see a radio galaxy. If they're at an angle, we see a quasar.

And when we're staring right down the barrel of the jet, that's a blazar.

It's the same object, seen from three different perspectives.

Supermassive black holes aren't always feeding.

If a black hole runs out of food, the jets run out of power and shut down.

Right up until something else gets too close, and the whole system starts up again.

The Milky Way has a supermassive black hole at its center, and it's all out of food.

It doesn't have an active galactic nucleus, and so, we don't appear as a quasar to some distant galaxy.

We may have in the past, and may again in the future.

In 10 billion years or so, when the Milky way collides with Andromeda, our supermassive black hole may roar to life as a quasar, consuming all this new material.

Supermassive Black Holes or Their Galaxies? Which Came First?

It’s a mystery that’s puzzled astronomers for years. Which came first, supermassive black holes or the galaxies that surround them?

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Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain / frasercain@gmail.com
Karla Thompson - @karlaii /
Chad Weber - weber.chad@gmail.com
Chloe Cain - Instagram: @chloegwen2001

Every time astronomers look farther out in the Universe, they discover new mysteries. These mysteries require all new tools and techniques to understand. These mysteries lead to more mysteries. What I’m saying is that it’s mystery turtles all the way down.

One of the most fascinating is the discovery of quasars, understanding what they are, and the unveiling of an even deeper mystery, where do they come from?

As always, I’m getting ahead of myself, so first, let’s go back and talk about the discovery of quasars.

Back in the 1950s, astronomers scanned the skies using radio telescopes, and found a class of bizarre objects in the distant Universe. They were very bright, and incredibly far away; hundreds of millions or even billion of light-years away. The first ones were discovered in the radio spectrum, but over time, astronomers found even more blazing in the visible spectrum.

The astronomer Hong-Yee Chiu coined the term “quasar”, which stood for quasi-stellar object. They were like stars, shining from a single point source, but they clearly weren’t stars, blazing with more radiation than an entire galaxy.

Over the decades, astronomers puzzled out the nature of quasars, learning that they were actually black holes, actively feeding and blasting out radiation, visible billions of light-years away.

But they weren’t the stellar mass black holes, which were known to be from the death of giant stars. These were supermassive black holes, with millions or even billions of times the mass of the Sun.

As far back as the 1970s, astronomers considered the possibility that there might be these supermassive black holes at the heart of many other galaxies, even the Milky Way.

In 1974, astronomers discovered a radio source at the center of the Milky Way emitting radiation. It was titled Sagittarius A*, with an asterisk that stands for “exciting”, well, in the “excited atoms” perspective.

This would match the emissions of a supermassive black hole that wasn’t actively feeding on material. Our own galaxy could have been a quasar in the past, or in the future, but right now, the black hole was mostly silent, apart from this subtle radiation.

Astronomers needed to be certain, so they performed a detailed survey of the very center of the Milky Way in the infrared spectrum, which allowed them to see through the gas and dust that obscures the core in visible light.

They discovered a group of stars orbiting Sagittarius A-star, like comets orbiting the Sun. Only a black hole with millions of times the mass of the Sun could provide the kind of gravitational anchor to whip these stars around in such bizarre orbits.

Further surveys found a supermassive black hole at the heart of the Andromeda Galaxy, in fact, it appears as if these monsters are at the center of almost every galaxy in the Universe.

But how did they form? Where did they come from? Did the galaxy form first, and cause the black hole to form at the middle, or did the black hole form, and build up a galaxy around them?

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