This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Monster BLACK HOLE | Full Documentary

x

Monster BLACK HOLE | Full Documentary

Monster Black Hole traces the life cycle of a black hole, from its violent beginnings in the early universe, to its growth to supermassive proportions at the center of a galaxy, and its death in deep time.

----

Space & Astronomy offers you full-length high quality documentaries, fully licensed and perfectly legal. Enjoy and don't forget to subscribe :)

----

Other channels you might be interested in:

criminals and crimefighters:

hazards and catastrophes:
x

Monster Black Holes - Space Documentary HD

A black hole is a mathematically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such a strong gravitational pull that no particle or electromagnetic radiation can escape from it. The theory of
general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.[2][3] The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event
horizon. Although crossing the event horizon has enormous effect on the fate of the object crossing it, it appears to have no locally detectable features. In many ways a black hole acts like
an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black
body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general
relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by
David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery
of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.Thanks for watching Please Like, Share, Comment and Subscribe.
x

Biggest Black Holes and Cosmic Monsters - Space Documentary 2015

Biggest Black Holes and Cosmic Monsters - Space Documentary 2015
Astronomers have identified a mammoth black hole weighing as much as 12 billion suns.


It's not the biggest black hole ever found, but it's astonishingly young. The giant appears to have swelled to its enormous size only 875 million years after the big bang, when the universe was just 6 percent of its current age. That's a surprise, astronomers report Wednesday in the journal Nature, because giant black holes are thought to grow relatively slowly by vacuuming up gas and even stars that venture too close.

How do you build such a big black hole in such a short time? asks Xue-Bing Wu of China's Peking University, lead author of the study.
x

Monster Black Hole - How the Universe Works (S04E03)

How the Universe Works - Monster Black Hole (Season 4/Episode 3).
Black holes are the least understood places in the universe, where the rules of physics collapse. We go inside the super-massive black hole in the center of the Milky Way.

Archived for educational purposes only. No copyright infringement intended. All rights belong to Discovery.

#HowTheUniverseWorks #MonsterBlackHole #Documentary #Discovery #BlackHole #Universe
x

Monster Black Holes - New NOVA Space Documentary 2015 HD

A black hole is a mathematically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such a strong gravitational pull that no particle or electromagnetic radiation can escape from it. The theory of
general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.[2][3] The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event
horizon. Although crossing the event horizon has enormous effect on the fate of the object crossing it, it appears to have no locally detectable features. In many ways a black hole acts like
an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black
body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general
relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by
David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery
of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle. After a black hole has formed, it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its
surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses (M☉) may form. There is general consensus that supermassive black
holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as visible light. Matter falling
onto a black hole can form an accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe. If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbit can be used
to determine its mass and location. Such observations can be used to exclude possible alternatives (such as neutron stars). In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole
candidates in binary systems, and established that the radio source known as Sgr A*, at the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million M☉.


Watch more:
*** *** *** *** *** ***
**************************************************

Thanks for Watching
Please Like and Subscribe to watch more videos

BBC Space Documentary Monster Black Holes and Time Science Documentary 2014 HD

BBC Space Documentary Monster Black Holes and Time Science Documentary 2014 HD

Monster Black Holes - New BBC Documentary 2015 HD

A black hole is a mathematically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such a strong gravitational pull that no particle or electromagnetic radiation can escape from it. The theory of
general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.[2][3] The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event
horizon. Although crossing the event horizon has enormous effect on the fate of the object crossing it, it appears to have no locally detectable features. In many ways a black hole acts like
an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black
body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general
relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by
David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery
of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle. After a black hole has formed, it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its
surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses (M☉) may form. There is general consensus that supermassive black
holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as visible light. Matter falling
onto a black hole can form an accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe. If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbit can be used
to determine its mass and location. Such observations can be used to exclude possible alternatives (such as neutron stars). In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole
candidates in binary systems, and established that the radio source known as Sgr A*, at the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million M☉.


Watch more:
*** *** *** *** *** ***
**************************************************

Thanks for Watching
Please Like and Subscribe to watch more videos

Monster Black Hole With Mass of 40,000,000,000 Suns

I have a NEW channel ► Meet, Arnold! -

If you like this video - put Thumb Up button (please) and
Subscribe to Ridddle channel. We will make this universe smarter together!
Okay, okay. I got to go..... See You Soooooooooooooooon dudes ;)

Black Holes National Geographic Documentary HD

Black Holes National Geographic Documentary HD
Documentaries Documentary HD BBC National Geography History Animal Planet
Subscribe US

The Largest Black Holes in the Universe

For more 4K space, and more great History and Science than you'll ever watch, check out our sister network...

Our Milky Way may harbor millions of black holes... the ultra dense remnants of dead stars. But now, in the universe far beyond our galaxy, there's evidence of something far more ominous. A breed of black holes that has reached incomprehensible size and destructive power. Just how large, and violent, and strange can they get?

A new era in astronomy has revealed a universe long hidden to us. High-tech instruments sent into space have been tuned to sense high-energy forms of light -- x-rays and gamma rays -- that are invisible to our eyes and do not penetrate our atmosphere. On the ground, precision telescopes are equipped with technologies that allow them to cancel out the blurring effects of the atmosphere. They are peering into the far reaches of the universe, and into distant caldrons of light and energy. In some distant galaxies, astronomers are now finding evidence that space and time are being shattered by eruptions so vast they boggle the mind.

We are just beginning to understand the impact these outbursts have had on the universe: On the shapes of galaxies, the spread of elements that make up stars and planets, and ultimately the very existence of Earth. The discovery of what causes these eruptions has led to a new understanding of cosmic history. Back in 1995, the Hubble space telescope was enlisted to begin filling in the details of that history. Astronomers selected tiny regions in the sky, between the stars. For days at a time, they focused Hubble's gaze on remote regions of the universe.

These hubble Deep Field images offered incredibly clear views of the cosmos in its infancy. What drew astronomers' attention were the tiniest galaxies, covering only a few pixels on Hubble's detector. Most of them do not have the grand spiral or elliptical shapes of large galaxies we see close to us today.

Instead, they are irregular, scrappy collections of stars. The Hubble Deep Field confirmed a long-standing idea that the universe must have evolved in a series of building blocks, with small galaxies gradually merging and assembling into larger ones.

ABOUT US
Here at SpaceRip, we value the exploration of the unknown. We surpass boundaries for the sake of uncovering the mysteries of the cosmos and what they may tell us about our origin and our future. With our videos, we hope to educate our viewers on how we fit into the universe, and more so how we can do our part to better it.

We have partnered with MagellanTV with the goal of providing our viewers with insight regarding our uncertain future on Earth and beyond. Equipped with knowledge, we hope to inspire people to enact change and pave the way for a better tomorrow.
x

What's Inside A Black Hole? | Unveiled

What's Inside A Black Hole?
Subscribe:

Black holes are mysterious and bizarre objects in the universe that really have no explanation. In fact, we hardly know anything about what lies inside of a black hole. We know and understand what we see on the outside of a black hole, but we have no way of going inside one to take a look at what is really happening. Even if we sent a probe inside a black hole, it would not survive the journey, and there would be no way that the probe could transmit a signal outside once it had been sucked inside. This is because a black hole is the product of mass being squeezed together so densely, and so tightly, that it creates a gravitational pull that is so strong, that not even light can escape its grasp.

Supermassive black holes with masses millions to billions of times that of the sun are thought to lurk at the hearts of all galaxies in the universe. You may notice that when you see a photo of a spiral galaxy, such as the Milky Way, in the center of the galaxy is a giant mass of light, which many people would think looks like a massive sun.

But this is not light coming from the black hole itself. Remember, that light cannot escape the heavy gravitational pull. Instead, the light we see comes from the magnetic fields near a spinning black hole that propel electrons outward in a jet along the rotation axis. The electrons produce bright radio waves. Quasars are believed to produce their energy from massive black holes in the center of the galaxies in which the quasars are located. Because quasars are so bright, they drown out the light from all the other stars in the same galaxy.

You’re probably asking, ‘well, what’s a quasar?’ A Quasar is the short name for ‘quasi-stellar object’ and is a very highly energetic object surrounding an actively feeding Supermassive Black Hole. In more basic terms, the Supermassive Black Hole in the middle of a galaxy feeds intermittently. As it feeds, gas swirls around it at incredible speeds and forms an insanely bright hot orbiting disk. And if the black hole is swallowing a large amount of material, this feeding is accompanied by gigantic jets of gas. These are called Quasar. They are essentially fueled by the Black Holes they orbit.

Monster Black Holes | Documentary 2015

Monster Black Holes | Documentary 2015

Travel to the edge of space and beyond to discover nature's ultimate abyss—black holes. Explore where they are found, how they begin, and how it may be possible to harness and use the power they produce. In Monster Black Holes, scientists steadily piece together the complex dynamics of a black hole's birth and also examine the growth of a select few black holes to super massive proportions that dominate the centers of galaxies. As a monster black hole swallows everything in its path, it generates energy that shapes the universe around it in powerful ways.

Journey into the heart of a black hole and explore what happens to matter when it comes too close, and whether our Milky Way galaxy will one day come to an end when the black hole at the galaxy's center explodes.
Not available for shipment outside of the U.S.

Astronomers have identified a mammoth black hole weighing as much as 12 billion suns.

It's not the biggest black hole ever found, but it's astonishingly young. The giant appears to have swelled to its enormous size only 875 million years after the big bang, when the universe was just 6 percent of its current age. That's a surprise, astronomers report Wednesday in the journal Nature, because giant black holes are thought to grow relatively slowly by vacuuming up gas and even stars that venture too close.

How do you build such a big black hole in such a short time? asks Xue-Bing Wu of China's Peking University, lead author of the study.

Bright Beast
Wu and his colleagues didn't see the black hole directly, since by definition it has such powerful gravity that nothing, including light, can escape from it. Instead, using telescopes in China, Hawaii, Arizona, and Chile, the team spotted a quasar, a powerful object lit by a brilliant glow of gas that heats up as it tries to squeeze itself into the black hole itself.

This is the biggest monster we've ever detected in terms of luminosity, says Avi Loeb, chair of the Harvard astronomy department, who was not involved in the research. It's about 40,000 times as bright as the entire Milky Way, Loeb says.

All major galaxies, including the Milky Way, have massive black holes at their cores, but not all of these are surrounded by superheated gas. The ones that are are known as quasars. And here, too, the newly discovered object, known as SDSS J010013.021280225.8, is extreme.

Like all quasars, the new object looks like an ordinary star. It's just a pinpoint of light, even through the most powerful telescopes. Only when astronomers analyzed the light in detail did they realize how fast it's moving away from Earth, and thus how far away it is (in an expanding universe, the most distant objects fly apart from each other the fastest). That told them how long the light from the quasar has been en route to Earth: about 12 billion years.

The quasar's extraordinary brightness tells the astronomers just how powerfully gas is being heated, which in turn tells them how astonishingly massive the underlying black hole is. We've seen other quasars from this period, says Wu, but none of them has a mass of more than three billion times that of the sun.

How to Build a Black Hole
Theorists believe the relatively modest giant formed when the first stars in the universe burned through their nuclear fuel and collapsed to form black holes, perhaps a hundred million years after the big bang. Those first stars were probably giants themselves, weighing in at a hundred times the mass of the sun. At that time, says Loeb, galaxies were up to a thousand times denser than they are today, so their tightly packed cores would have provided a lot of gas to feed the black holes, allowing them to swell.

But that scenario doesn't work for the newly discovered black hole: It's just too huge. It must have been accreting gas at close to the maximum rate for most of its existence, writes Bram Venemans of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany, in an accompanying commentary in Nature. That's considered implausible because the blast of light from a brilliant quasar tends to drive off nearby gas that would otherwise fall in.

Another idea is that two or more galaxies merged together early on, their black holes coalescing into one. That would only work, though, if both black holes had the same mass. Otherwise, says Loeb, the imbalance would throw the new, single black hole aside.

Loeb offers another idea, however. It's possible that at least some of the first stars had not a hundred solar masses, or even a thousand, but as much as a million suns packed into one. There's no fundamental limit on the maximum mass a star can reach, he says.

The only problem with the jump-start scenario is that astronomers don't know for sure that million-solar-mass stars ever existed. We've never seen one, Loeb admits. But with the James Webb Space Telescope, he says, which is scheduled to go into orbit in 2018, we just might.

The Most Dangerous Supermassive Giant Black Hole in the Universe Documentary HD 1080p

Subscribe to New Documentary: s://.com/channel/UCQyI . On our channel a lot of interesting documentaries on such themes: to destroy the Land, kill the Earth, .

Universe - How The Super Black Hole Was Created | Discovery Documentary 1080p.

Blow Your Mind - Extraterrestrial Alien Life In The Universe Space Documentary LIKE -------------SHARE------------COMMENT Subscribe us on Youtube .

Full Documentary Films: SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES Space Exploration Documentary. A super massive black hole is thought to form from the joining of .

Supermassive Black Hole | How The Universe Works

Ever wanted to learn more about supermassive black holes, find out every last details about these huge celestial bodies here.
Subscribe to Discovery UK for more great clips:


Follow Discovery UK on Twitter:

Black Holes

Subscribe to Naked Science -

Every other Wednesday we present a new video, so join us to see the truth laid bare...

Somewhere in our galaxy, at some time in the future, a spacecraft from Earth will encounter the most dangerous object in the Universe. A stunning visual journey into black holes, their structure and their creation.

A black hole is a geometrically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such strong gravitational effects that nothing, including particles and electromagnetic radiation such as light, can escape from inside it. The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.
x

The Most Dangerous Supermassive Giant Black Hole in the Universe Documentary HD 1080p

Subscribe to New Documentary:
s://..com/channel/UCQyI
...
On our channel a lot of interesting documentaries on such themes: to destroy the Land, kill the Earth, end of Earth, the death Land, death Land, doomsday, Armageddon, Apocalypse, space, about space, star, stars, universe, galaxy, big Bang the big Bang theory, constellation, planet, solar system, satellite, UFO, aliens, Earth, planet Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Venus, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, mercury, astronaut, rocket, meteor, comet, astronomy, matter, quasar, telescope, meteor, Infinity, planets, Sun, Hubble, asteroid, documentary, black hole, quasar, national geographic documentary, full documentary, discovery documentary, history documentary, bbc documentary, national geographic, the universe, discovery channel, stephen hawking, brian greene, Neil deGrasse Tyson,
Please Like this documentary;)

Black Holes 101 | National Geographic

At the center of our galaxy, a supermassive black hole churns. Learn about the types of black holes, how they form, and how scientists discovered these invisible, yet extraordinary objects in our universe.
➡ Subscribe:

#NationalGeographic #BlackHoles #Educational

About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

Get More National Geographic:
Official Site:
Facebook:
Twitter:
Instagram:

Read more at Black Holes 101


Black Holes 101 | National Geographic


National Geographic

BLACK HOLES - Full Documentary - Penetrating the Mystery of Singularities

A black hole is a place in space where gravity pulls so much that even light can not get out. The gravity is so strong because matter has been squeezed into a tiny space. This can happen when a star is dying. Because no light can get out, people can't see black holes. They are invisible. Space telescopes with special tools can help find black holes. The special tools can see how stars that are very close to black holes act differently than other stars.

How Big Are Black Holes?

Black holes can be big or small. Scientists think the smallest black holes are as small as just one atom. These black holes are very tiny but have the mass of a large mountain. Mass is the amount of matter, or stuff, in an object.

Another kind of black hole is called stellar. Its mass can be up to 20 times more than the mass of the sun. There may be many, many stellar mass black holes in Earth's galaxy. Earth's galaxy is called the Milky Way.

The largest black holes are called supermassive. These black holes have masses that are more than 1 million suns together. Scientists have found proof that every large galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its center. The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy is called Sagittarius A. It has a mass equal to about 4 million suns and would fit inside a very large ball that could hold a few million Earths.


How Do Black Holes Form?
Scientists think the smallest black holes formed when the universe began.

Stellar black holes are made when the center of a very big star falls in upon itself, or collapses. When this happens, it causes a supernova. A supernova is an exploding star that blasts part of the star into space.

Scientists think supermassive black holes were made at the same time as the galaxy they are in.


If Black Holes Are Black, How Do Scientists Know They Are There?
A black hole can not be seen because strong gravity pulls all of the light into the middle of the black hole. But scientists can see how the strong gravity affects the stars and gas around the black hole. Scientists can study stars to find out if they are flying around, or orbiting, a black hole.

When a black hole and a star are close together, high-energy light is made. This kind of light can not be seen with human eyes. Scientists use satellites and telescopes in space to see the high-energy light.


Could a Black Hole Destroy Earth?
Black holes do not go around in space eating stars, moons and planets. Earth will not fall into a black hole because no black hole is close enough to the solar system for Earth to do that.

Even if a black hole the same mass as the sun were to take the place of the sun, Earth still would not fall in. The black hole would have the same gravity as the sun. Earth and the other planets would orbit the black hole as they orbit the sun now.

The sun will never turn into a black hole. The sun is not a big enough star to make a black hole.


How Is NASA Studying Black Holes?
NASA is using satellites and telescopes that are traveling in space to learn more about black holes. These spacecraft help scientists answer questions about the universe.

A Black Hole That Broke the Science

This year, on April 10th, scientists were finally able to do the unthinkable: they allowed humanity to look straight into the abyss of a super-massive black hole and take a photo like a tourist attraction! But even after these accomplishments, we still don’t know much about black holes at all, since one of them has challenged the whole scientific community with new impossible feats.

In the middle of July 2019, black holes puzzled astronomers once again. New observations were made possible, thanks to the famed Hubble telescope, by a team of European scientists. Their study showed that a relatively small black hole contradicts all our expectations by almost completely mimicking its much bigger siblings.

Other videos you might like:
A Mysterious Object Punched a Hole in the Milky Way, Scientists Are Confused
13 Scariest Theories That'll Make Your Blood Run Cold
The Alien Signals Mystery Might Have Been Solved

TIMESTAMPS:
What is a black hole? 1:01
How do any object can become a black hole ???? 1:31
Why black holes are called black 3:02
Why the NGC 3147’s black hole is so unique 4:26

#blackholes #universe #brightside

SUMMARY:
- What is a black hole? It’s the tiniest and heaviest object possible in the universe. It can swallow entire stars with ease and is absolutely invisible to the human eye.
- Every black hole was once a shining star, just like the others you see in the night sky.
- The core, and center of mass, of this black hole is called a singularity. The mass of this thing can be from hundreds of millions of the Sun’s mass, to hundreds of billions!
- In fact, the density is the most exciting thing about black holes. You see, it turns out that any object can become a tiny black hole if compressed enough.
- The surrounding space near the singularity is the notorious event horizon. This is exactly why black holes are called black, though it’s not entirely true.
- Accretion disks consist mostly of superheated gas and space dust, and the speed of their movement increases the closer they get to the event horizon.
- The supermassive black hole at the core of IC 1101 suits its huge galaxy well. This terrifying monster is heavier than about 40 billion masses of the Sun.
- The Milky Way is just 100,000 light-years across – sounds like nothing when compared to the supposed 6 million light-years of IC 1101’s diameter.
- The most notable black hole in the Milky Way is in the Sagittarius constellation, right in the middle of the spiral of stars that our galaxy’s basically made of.
- And then we have spiral galaxy NGC 3147, 130 million light-years away from us. This galaxy is small, and not dense enough to constantly feed something as big and powerful as a supermassive black hole.
- It’s expected that black holes, in a position this unfortunate, can’t have furious swirling accretion disks around them.
- But as they say, there’s no negative result in scientific research. Sometimes unexpected findings can teach us a lot more than pure success.
- For now, no one knows how this starving black hole can support this disk.

Music by Epidemic Sound

Subscribe to Bright Side :
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Our Social Media:
Facebook:
Instagram:
5-Minute Crafts Youtube:

Stock materials (photos, footages and other):




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
For more videos and articles visit:

New BBC Documentary Full HD - Monster Black Holes National Geographic

National Geographic Documentary | Black Holes & Monsters of Universe | Science Documentary Full HD Black holes of stellar .

New BBC Documentary Full HD - Monster Black Holes National Geographic Travel to the edge of space and beyond to discover .

Somewhere, not farm from Earth, a star dies. It explodes in a violent supernova and leaves behind the strangest phenomenta in the Cosmos - a black hole.

National Geographic Documentary | Lake Monster of the North Full HD | Science Documentaries A lake monster (or, in Scotland, .

Menu